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Wrong! Stretching Is NOT the Best Thing to Do before a Workout, Then What to Do Instead?

Wrong! Stretching Is NOT the Best Thing to Do before a Workout, Then What to Do Instead?

Old habits are hard to break.

This also seems to be the case when it comes to the old school static stretching that you used to do in your physical education class. Static stretching, like tugging on your arms and legs has been the default “warm up” activity for decades, promising to be the best way to warm up for a workout or athletic competition. However, stretching is not the best thing you can do before your workout. In fact, what you’re about to read may go against everything you’ve been taught about stretching before you workout.

The one thing you shouldn’t do at this time is the very thing that most people do: stretch. So why is stretching before a workout a bad idea? Here are 5 reasons.

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1. Stretching is not the same as a warm up.

This is probably the hugest misunderstanding when it comes to preparing yourself for a workout. It’s imperative that you understand that these two routines (stretching vs. warming up) have completely different identities.

2. Stretching does not prepare your body for exercise.

Stretching actually decreases your heart rate and doesn’t stimulate your nervous system to prepare for the high intensity workout you’re about to take on. A study published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research shows that stretching before you lift weights may leave you weaker and less coordinated during your workout.

3. Stretching alone, before a workout, might increase risk of injury.

According to research in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, stretching doesn’t prepare your muscles for eccentric loading (negative reps), which is when most strains are believed to occur.

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4. Stretching doesn’t prevent injury.

The idea that stretching prevents injury is almost a folk tale dating back to when Physical Education classes where introduced in school. It’s had a long life, but it’s time to put the idea to rest. Simply put, there isn’t any research to show that stretching alone helps prevent injury.

5. Stretching can make you sleepy.

Passive, static stretching has a calming effect that can make you sleepy—not exactly the mood you’re looking for before an intense workout.

So what should you do instead?

Perform a full body dynamic warm. Warming up will prepare all of your systems to ensure that you perform most efficiently in your workout. A good warm up should affect the heart, blood vessels, nervous system, muscles and tendons, along with the joints and ligaments. Additionally, a good warm up will sharpen your reaction time, enhance concentration, improve coordination and regulate your mental and emotional state. The warm up template below is a surefire way to ensure that your mind and body will be prepared to take on any workout.

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  • 5–10 minutes of aerobic activity (jog, bike, row)
  • 5 minutes of dynamic stretching and mobilitywod work (arm swings, leg swings, lunges, neck rolls, mountain climbers, foam rolling, voo doo flossing)
  • 5 minute mental prep

By using this template and performing a makeover on your warm up rather than just stretching, here is how you’ll improve your health mentally and physically:

  • The aerobic activity will prepare your cardiovascular system for exercise.
  • The dynamic stretching will not only prepare your joints and ligament for similar movements you’ll be doing in your workout, but it will also raise and maintain body temperature as you enter your workout. (static stretching can drop your temperature).
  • By practicing visualization and including mental prep in your warm up, you’ll not only be laser focused for your workout, but you’ll improve movement efficacy lowering your risk of injury.

Things to do before (and during) your workout to prevent injury bonus tips:

  • Eat some carbs.

    Glucose is fuel for your brain. If you don’t eat any carbs pre workout or have been on a low carb diet for a long time, your reaction time suffers. In an intense workout, this can lead to injury when you’re performing a complex movement like a box jump.

  • Train hard but train smart.

    Unless you’re an aspiring professional athlete or are already one, you need to listen to your body. Understand this before you enter your workout. Trying to break a personal record on your deadlift or 10k run is great, but if you do it at the expense of a herniated disk or stress fracture in your foot, it’s not worth much. You don’t get paid to do this; train hard, but train smart.

  • Intra-workout nutrition is important.

    During your workout, you want to minimize protein degradation, meaning you don’t want your body to resort to your lean body mass for fuel. When your workouts run for a long time, intra-workout nutrition becomes critical for you to preserve lean muscle mass. Intra-workout nutrition will also help you prevent injury as well. How? By making sure you avoid low blood glucose and avoiding depletion of glycogen (stored carbohydrate) with a intra-workout drink, you keep yourself away from leaving the door open for injury with the symptoms of low blood glucose like dizziness, shakiness, headache, blurred vision and weakness. None of these sound like they provide an optimal workout environment, right? A general prescription for intra workout drinks is to have 10–15g of carbohydrates and a blend of branch chain amino acids every 30 minutes.

So when is the best time to stretch? (And yes, you should stretch!) There are two times when you should perform static stretching, which are right after your workout as a cool down or if you are doing a yoga session. A cool down consisting of stretching will slow down the physiological functions of your body enhancing your recovery after your workout. Performing your cool down outdoors or in a natural environment is great for allowing your mind and body to enter a calming recuperative state after an intense workout. By combining both a warm up and cool down to your workout sessions, you will improve your health and decrease the chance of injury.

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Featured photo credit: http://depositphotos.com/portfolio-1759606.html via depositphotos.com

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

Being in a hurry all the time drains your energy. Your work and routine life make you feel overwhelmed. Getting caught up in things beyond your control stresses you out…

If you’d like to stay calm and cool in stressful situations, put the following 8 steps into practice:

1. Breathe

The next time you’re faced with a stressful situation that makes you want to hurry, stop what you’re doing for one minute and perform the following steps:

  • Take five deep breaths in and out (your belly should come forward with each inhale).
  • Imagine all that stress leaving your body with each exhale.
  • Smile. Fake it if you have to. It’s pretty hard to stay grumpy with a goofy grin on your face.

Feel free to repeat the above steps every few hours at work or home if you need to.

2. Loosen up

After your breathing session, perform a quick body scan to identify any areas that are tight or tense. Clenched jaw? Rounded shoulders? Anything else that isn’t at ease?

Gently touch or massage any of your body parts that are under tension to encourage total relaxation. It might help to imagine you’re in a place that calms you: a beach, hot tub, or nature trail, for example.

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3. Chew slowly

Slow down at the dinner table if you want to learn to be patient and lose weight. Shoveling your food down as fast as you can is a surefire way to eat more than you need to (and find yourself with a bellyache).

Be a mindful eater who pays attention to the taste, texture, and aroma of every dish. Chew slowly while you try to guess all of the ingredients that were used to prepare your dish.

Chewing slowly will also reduce those dreadful late-night cravings that sneak up on you after work.

4. Let go

Cliche as it sounds, it’s very effective.

The thing that seems like the end of the world right now?

It’s not. Promise.

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Stressing and worrying about the situation you’re in won’t do any good because you’re already in it, so just let it go.

Letting go isn’t easy, so here’s a guide to help you:

21 Things To Do When You Find It Hard To Let Go

5. Enjoy the journey

Focusing on the end result can quickly become exhausting. Chasing a bold, audacious goal that’s going to require a lot of time and patience? Split it into several mini-goals so you’ll have several causes for celebration.

Stop focusing on the negative thoughts. Giving yourself consistent positive feedback will help you grow patience, stay encouraged, and find more joy in the process of achieving your goals.

6. Look at the big picture

The next time you find your stress level skyrocketing, take a deep breath, and ask yourself:

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Will this matter to me…

  • Next week?
  • Next month?
  • Next year?
  • In 10 years?

Hint: No, it won’t.

I bet most of the stuff that stresses you wouldn’t matter the next week, maybe not even the next day.

Stop agonizing over things you can’t control because you’re only hurting yourself.

7. Stop demanding perfection of yourself

You’re not perfect and that’s okay. Show me a person who claims to be perfect and I’ll show you a dirty liar.

Demanding perfection of yourself (or anybody else) will only stress you out because it just isn’t possible.

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8. Practice patience every day

Below are a few easy ways you can practice patience every day, increasing your ability to remain calm and cool in times of stress:

  • The next time you go to the grocery store, get in the longest line.
  • Instead of going through the drive-thru at your bank, go inside.
  • Take a long walk through a secluded park or trail.

Final thoughts

Staying calm in stressful situations is possible, all you need is some daily practice.

Taking deep breaths and eat mindfully are some simple ways to train your brain to be more patient. But changing the way you think of a situation and staying positive are most important in keeping cool whenever you feel overwhelmed and stressful.

Featured photo credit: Brooke Cagle via unsplash.com

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