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When Healthy Eating Becomes A “Disorder”: 10 Ways To Diagnose Orthorexia

When Healthy Eating Becomes A “Disorder”: 10 Ways To Diagnose Orthorexia

As a recovering anorexic and bulimic, I catch myself constantly being overly cautious about what I eat and what I don’t. There are certain foods that still have the power to send me into an unconscious binge, while even certain amounts of other foods create an obsession to “fast” and eat healthier “from now on.”

According to an article written by Karin Kratina, Ph.D. of the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), (https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/orthorexia-nervosa), orthorexia by definition is “to be fixated on healthy eating.” Such an intense focus on anything indicates an unhealthy relationship with the object, and can throw every aspect of one’s life out of balance. One very strong indication of orthorexia is eating only certain foods that have been labeled healthy either by society’s standards or the standards of the people themselves. While there are many positive reasons behind eating “better” and more mindfully, orthorexics don’t allow themselves to eat any foods — healthy or otherwise — that aren’t on their “approved” list.

While orthorexia hasn’t yet been technically classified an eating disorder and diagnosing it can only be done by healthcare professionals, here are 10 characteristics people with orthorexia exhibit.

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1. They obsessively read food labels.

People with orthorexia will constantly be checking package labels for ingredients in foods they allow themselves to eat…or don’t. If canola oil, for example is something they won’t allow themselves to eat, any product with that specific type of oil — organic, raw or otherwise — will stay on the grocery store shelf.

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    2.  They lack focus and joy.

    Healthy eating becomes so much a priority for the orthorexic they often lose their zest for life and focus solely on food. Happiness is generally short-lived and usually comes only as a result of finding a new food or restaurant they can enjoy based on their food choices. Life literally revolves around nutrition for the orthorexic.

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    3. They become “unhealthy.”

    Because the people experiencing orthorexia are so limited in their food choices, they often miss out on the vitamins and nutrients necessary to sustain the health they are striving to achieve. Sleep is often affected when this happens, and along with sleep deprivation comes the body’s inability to properly recover or restore its much need physical and mental equilibrium.

    4.  They isolate themselves.

    Being in public, especially in situations where food will be served, tends to is often a struggle for people fixated on healthy eating. Most of the time orthorexics will become less and less social simply because the stress of having to hide their food issues or make excuses for “not being hungry” is exhausting and overwhelming. It is much easier and safer for a person with these tendencies to become homebodies in controlled environments.

    5.  They agonize over eating out.

    Finding a restaurant that serves foods on their “healthy” list is another major stressor for orthorexics. They will find two or three specific places which will modify or already have on the menu the ingredients they will allow themselves to eat. Many times orthorexics will be  for their “picky,” “diva” or “complicated” ordering, which makes the experience even more traumatic for the person suffering from the food disorder.

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      6.  They criticize other’s food choices. 

      Orthorexics will many times make themselves feel better about their “perfect” eating habits by criticizing other people’s less healthy choices. When they see someone eating food from off limit establishments such as fast food restaurants or ice cream shops, orthorexics tend to point out every detail that’s wrong with what the other person is eating. The way the food is cooked, the nutrition facts and the ingredients of each menu item are scrutinized and then explained in detail as to why they’re incredibly unhealthy choices.

      7.  They glorify their “healthy” lifestyle.

      People living with orthorexic tendencies will more often than not try to gain attention and acknowledgment for their adaptation to and perfecting of a “healthy” lifestyle. They feel as if because they are diligent with their healthy food choices which excludes everything deemed detrimental to a person’s optimal functioning, they are entitled to exalt the way they’re living.

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      8.  They exercise excessively.

      Exercising also becomes a fixation for people suffering from orthorexia. In order to maintain the healthiest lifestyle possible, food regulation is accompanied by the desire to “work off” anything extra they may have eaten that wasn’t in their meal plan. Looking the part of a healthy lifestyle, in the mind of orthorexics, by being physically attractive and “in-shape” is another indicator speaking to the mindset of the person striving to be the epitome of perfect health.

      9.  They thrive on perfectionism.  

      Ultimately the issues behind orthorexics’ thoughts and habits run them directly into the wall of perfectionism. These issues usually stem from the need to control every aspect of their own lives; however, since external influences are constantly varying, the perfectionist will do whatever is necessary to make flawless their food intake and exercise regimens.

      10. They run out of good foods.

      Inevitably orthorexics become so restrictive with even their “acceptable” healthy foods that they’re left with only a few choices and even more health problems, as suggested by Sarah Horne Grose in her article for The Cut (http://nymag.com/thecut/2014/07/10-ways-to-spot-an-orthorexic.html). This puts into motion the excruciating cycle becoming more healthy and more perfect, which spirals into less nutrition with more exercise and eventually leads to an even less joyful existence.

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        While each one of these symptoms of orthorexic may seem devastating and insurmountable, please know without any doubt there is help and healing available to everyone suffering from any form of eating disorder. There is absolutely nothing wrong with reaching out to a trusted friend, co-worker, classmate, teacher or even life coach or other professional for support and guidance. Life was not meant to be lived or problems solved alone, so asking for help in learning new habits and life skills is by far the greatest sign of strength and health possible. It’s never too late to start writing the next chapter of the greatest story ever told!

        More by this author

        When Healthy Eating Becomes A “Disorder”: 10 Ways To Diagnose Orthorexia 10 Ways To Let Go Of People Who You No Longer Need In Life 10 Benefits of Being Yourself That Could Change Your Life This is Why Money “Can” Buy Happiness…Maybe 3 Reasons You May Not Need A Religion

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        Last Updated on September 16, 2019

        How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

        How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

        You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

        We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

        The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

        Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

        1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

        Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

        For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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        • (1) Research
        • (2) Deciding the topic
        • (3) Creating the outline
        • (4) Drafting the content
        • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
        • (6) Revision
        • (7) etc.

        Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

        2. Change Your Environment

        Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

        One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

        3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

        Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

        Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

        My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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        Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

        4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

        If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

        Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

        I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

        5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

        I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

        Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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        As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

        6. Get a Buddy

        Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

        I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

        7. Tell Others About Your Goals

        This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

        For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

        8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

        What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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        9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

        If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

        Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

        10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

        Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

        Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

        11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

        At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

        Reality check:

        I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

        More About Procrastination

        Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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