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How You React to Crying Babies Will Determine Their Future

How You React to Crying Babies Will Determine Their Future

Scientific findings show how parents react to crying babies can have an important impact on their development. Infants with parents who respond quickly, consistently, and warmly when they cry have healthy emotional development later on. These studies have suggested that responsive and sensitive parents can protect children from developing stress coping mechanisms. One study looked at babies born with predisposed stress-related symptoms and their parents, and concluded that even though there were risk factors in the babies for stress, they were able to be relieved with affectionate caresses during early infancy.

Quick and consistent response to a crying baby, referred to sometimes as “sensitive parenting,” might also make the difference between success and failure at school. Researchers have concluded that infants with relatively insensitive parents end up with the worst behavioral problems. At a chemical level, affectionate touch and other nurturing behaviors appear to trigger the release of feel-good neurotransmitters like oxytocin. With the release of these hormones, there is a fast recovery from stressful events.

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As important as it is to respond warmly and quickly to a crying baby, it is also important to prevent the baby from being exposed to angry or fearful voices, negative body language, and being left alone in distress. Avoiding these stressful situations can also facilitate a baby’s learning and the development of positive social relationships. To better understand this concepts let us look at the physiological responses related to them:

1. Touch

Research studies have suggested that touch triggers the release of natural pain-killers and sedatives, thus counteracting the effects of stress. This is demonstrated in one study that looked that effect of a heel prick and signs of distress in infants. Once held naked against their mothers’ bare skin, the level of stress hormone levels was greatly reduced. Touch is vital, but more specifically the type of touch is also vital. For example, researchers have discovered that light touch in younger babies (two to six months old) can be irritating to them and so a firmer touch might be more preferred. The key is a gentle, slow, moderate pressure, a kind of infant massage. Touch is also more likely to soothe when it’s accompanied by other forms of affectionate contact.

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2. Body language

Babies begin to recognize facial expressions immediately after birth. A large body of research indicates that babies prefer to look at happy faces, and are upset by displays of negative emotion. One study looked at six-month-old babies and found that they can distinguish between happy and angry body language, alternatively affecting their emotional development later on.

3. Movement

As noted above, all factors are important when trying to respond appropriately to crying babies, and movement is equally vital. One study showed that babies experienced slower heart rates and reduced crying when they were held by an adult who was moving or rocking them from side to side.

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4. Cleanliness

One common factor that contributes to babies’ crying is comfort and cleanliness. Many times a diaper change can be stressful for a baby which presents with a dilemma. Should you change the diaper, or let the baby sleep through with a wet diaper? Some researchers have suggested that unless your baby has a skin infection, there is no need to wake up a sleeping baby for a diaper change.

5. Company

The World Health Organization recommends that infants under the age of six months sleep in the same room as their parents. This sleeping arrangement ensures that caregivers will be on hand if the baby is distressed or experiences a life-threatening event, and there may be other benefits too. Researchers speculate that having parents nearby at night may help babies regulate the stress response during the day.

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For more information on the research studies discussed above, click here.

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Last Updated on November 3, 2020

What Is FOMO (And How to Get Over It and Move on)

What Is FOMO (And How to Get Over It and Move on)

What is FOMO, exactly?

Are you unable to say “no” to a party invitation, even if you have work to do? Do you feel like an outsider if you don’t see the hottest Hollywood movie everyone is talking about? Do you feel that you have to buy the latest and hottest “making money online” information product because everyone else is doing so?

If you have been in these or similar situations before, you have just experienced FOMO. Social networking has exacerbated this problem and made it something we now have to actively combat.

In this article, we’ll look into what FOMO is and how to get over it.

What Is FOMO?

I learned about FOMO by reading a book Find Your Focus Zone by Lucy Jo Palladino. In that book, she described FOMO with an everyday example: Have you ever felt that you had to pick up the cell phone right away when it rings?

The longer the phone rings, the more and more you experience the fear of missing out (FOMO). You feel that there is something important you are about to miss if you don’t pick up the phone immediately.

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The most important element in FOMO is the word “fear,” It makes us to do things even when we necessarily don’t want to. It’s logic versus emotion: When a compelling option is presented to us, we feel like an outsider if we say “no” to that. We may even fear that we’ll miss the opportunity of a lifetime if we say “no.”

At the same time, we know that we probably shouldn’t say “yes” because we may be spreading ourselves too thin. Also, there are going to be plenty of other opportunities out there, so missing this one probably won’t make a difference after all.

Symptoms of FOMO

When you are a victim of the fear of missing out, you are going to experience at least one of the following:

Procrastinating — Being Unfocused and Stressed

It’s obvious that when the temptation to say “yes” to a request is too big, you accept yet another task or project.

In practice, you are spreading yourself too thin. Not only are you stressed out by too many activities in your life, but it increases the likelihood for procrastination. This is because you cannot keep up with your schedule and you start finding excuses for not doing something you promised.

Losing Money

Sometimes you don’t want to feel like being an outsider in a group by making different decisions than the rest of the people.

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For example, I have been in internet marketing circles for a couple of years, and every time there is a big product launch coming, there is a lot of buzz around it.

Since this “next shiny object” is probably going to make you rich and famous overnight, you don’t want to miss out. If you do, others are going to be rich and famous, not you.

Unfortunately, in many situations like these, nothing groundbreaking is going to happen after all (no fame, no money, just hard work). It is yet another product launch, which is going to waste your money if FOMO gets a hold on you.

Feeling Overwhelmed

Being overwhelmed is one of the symptoms of fear of missing out. When you are unable to say “no,” feeling overwhelmed is destined to happen at some point.

There is just too much going on at the same time, and you are unable to focus on anything properly.

How to Get Over FOMO

There are certain things you can do when you experience FOMO.[1]

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What Does FOMO Mean and How Do I Deal With It?

     

    1. Be Aware of It

    The first thing is to be aware of the feeling. Stop for a moment and acknowledge when you are having a feeling of FOMO.

    Understand that this is a natural (although undesirable) way of reacting in a certain situation. We all wish we could say “yes” all the time, but we’re only human.

    2. Be Honest With Yourself and Others

    Honesty is one of the best ways to deal with the situation.

    First, you have to be honest to yourself: If you say “yes,” you have to understand that you may be spreading yourself too thin.

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    Second, it is also important to be honest with others, too. They have to be aware that you may not be 100% committed to their requests if you have plenty of action going on at the same time.

    3. Make a Quick Decision Regarding the Situation

    One of the worst things you can do is be on the fence. As long as something is left undecided, it is using your brain capacity for nothing.

    That’s why it is imperative to say “no” to an opportunity as quickly as possible if you feel you are unable to commit to it 100%.

    When you say “no,” you may even regret your decision at first. On the other hand, if you are meant to experience the opportunity at all, it will come available to you at a later time.

    4. Change Your Perspective

    Lastly, one step in defeating the FOMO is to see if a situation or event supports your short or long term goals.If it doesn’t, it’s likely better for you to get off social media sites that can increase FOMO and say no. Instead, focus on everything you have to be grateful for in life at this moment. Try spending time with friends and family and improve the important relationships in your life. These are the things that you’ll really regret missing out on and what will ultimately improve your life satisfaction.

    The Bottom Line

    FOMO can lead you to distraction and can push you to do things you really don’t care about. However, there is a way to overcome the fear. Once you learn to handle it, you will feel better and will feel ready to take on more things that add genuine fulfillment to your life.

    More on the Fear of Missing Out

    Featured photo credit: Erik Lucatero via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] Very Well Mind: How to Deal With FOMO in Your Life

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