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Five Foods You Hate as a Kid But Love as an Adult

Five Foods You Hate as a Kid But Love as an Adult

There’s no doubt about it–kids are picky eaters.

According to Kids Eat Right, kids “are born with an instinctive desire for sweet and salty foods, and an instinctive aversion to sour and bitter tastes,” which would explain why our food preferences consisted of powdered donuts and popsicles when we were young.

However, as we get older and our taste buds begin to diminish (sob!), our inclination toward sweet and salty foods expands to include the bitter, sour foods we avoided before.

In the article “FYI: Why Do Kids Hate Brussels Sprouts,” Popular Science explores this alternation over time as a result of adults realizing “even though something tastes bitter or sour, it won’t kill us, and we learn to enjoy it,” considering “sweetness typically indicates that something is safe to eat” for children.

But as age brings riskiness in our food choices (as well as in our personal choices), we begin to love the food we hated as children, thus becoming the people we never thought we’d be–adults.

Here’s a list of five foods you hate as a kid, but learn to love as an adult:

1. Avocado

Avocado_halved

    I cringe to think of all the times I pushed those slices of avocado to the side of my plate, wasting God’s miracle fruit every time my mom made Mexican food or tossed it in a salad. These days, avocado is an essential component of my daily diet. I feel incomplete without it in at least one of my meals, and for good reason. It’s not only delicious, but it’s one of the healthiest fruits out there.

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    However, in a study conducted by Mail Online, the website found avocado at the top the “food hate list” of children. In fact, experts found “out of 100 common foods, the avocado rated the lowest, being one of only 10 which scored minus marks.”

    “I suspect that avocado comes out as the most hated food more because of its unusual texture, rather than the taste,” said Dr. Wendy Doyle, of the British Dietetic Association.

    Though I understand the aversion (because let’s be real, we all went through it too), it’s a difficult pill to swallow now thinking of all those trashcans full of untouched avocado.

    But I guess that means more avocados for us, and an excuse to shamelessly trash-dig–at least for me.

    2. Brussels sprouts

    121116091239-brussels-sprouts-story-top

      As a kid, I thought they smelled and tasted like baby diapers. Each trip to the kitchen while my mom boiled them was shortly followed by a plug of the nose and dash for the upstairs. You think I’m kidding. I wish I was.

      Now as an adult, I love them. I can’t get enough of them. There are so many delicious ways to make Brussels sprouts, though my favorite way is to boil them (yes, I love and do the exact thing my mom did that I hated as a child).

      But while I’m obsessed with them now, I can see why I despised Brussels sprouts so much as a kid. In the blunt words of Popular Science, kids hate the vegetable “because Brussels sprouts are bitter, and kids generally don’t like bitter tastes.”

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      Though I’m “bitter” (sorry not sorry for the bad taste bud joke) I didn’t appreciate these scrumptious balls of Brussels earlier, I’m glad they’re one of my favorite veggies nowadays.

      After all, parents apparently shouldn’t bother pulling them off the produce shelf. It looks like there’s more for me anyway. I’d like to believe I’m doing families a favor.

      3. Dark chocolate

      dark-chocolate

        The name alone sends my taste buds into a frenzy, while the craving creates actual chaos. Chocolate has that effect on me, and I’m not the only one. It’s one of those foods you hate to love and love to love all at once.

        When I was growing up, I was lucky to find chocolate in my pantry. These days, my pantry is filled with it. But back then you wouldn’t have caught my hand in the dark chocolate chip cookie jar. It was all about the milk chocolate. Today, it’s all about the dark chocolate. I like the bitterness of the cocoa whereas before I compared the taste to tree bark.

        But I have to admit, I had to train myself to like dark chocolate. It’s essentially as healthy as tree bark, so making the switch was a move on my healthy-diet-minded part. Now though, I prefer it to its milk-based counterpart.

        According to the io9 article “The psychology of hating food (and how we learn to love it),” studies concluded “our food preferences are learned, though we have a predisposition to like certain tastes.” And for most adults, like myself, we’ve trained ourselves to cross over to the “dark side” (another shameless taste bud joke).

        But thank goodness I, and many others, did. I mean, why feel more guilty about eating the best thing to happen to this world when we could enjoy it semi-less-guilt-free?

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        You tell me, kids.

        4. Strong cheeses

        cheese-2

          Cheddar…was manageable as a child. Mozzarella string cheese, even better. But Gouda? Brie? Havarti? Yuck. Those were automatically placed in the “untouchable” section of my refrigerator.

          In looking back at my strict aversion to these strong cheeses, I can see why I loathed them as a kid. It all had to do with their smell.

          Wonderopolis expanded on this idea of how smell plays an important role in our taste bud development saying, “A food that has a strong smell might be unattractive to children who might otherwise not mind its taste alone.”

          Personally, I’ve always been a little more cautious toward cheese since I never really liked it when I was growing up. Nowadays, I’m picky about my cheese, but express a love for feta, ricotta, parmesan, and sharp cheddar that I never would have previously.

          When I was a kid though, the smell of these cheeses made me sick. I hated them simply because of their smell. Considering my sense of smell as an adult has become less sensitive, these cheeses have become more tolerable as well.

          So while kids may hate strong cheeses, it’s good to know it doesn’t necessarily have to do with their flavor. Now, to conquer blue cheese…though the smell of it still makes me sick.

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          5. Coffee/Tea

          coffee-tea-small-783561

            To be fair, coffee and tea are usually considered adult drinks. Most adults consume either drink each morning to caffeinate themselves for the long day ahead of them and believe me, the little boost of caffeine definitely helps (at least in my opinion).

            Growing up though, I rarely had the opportunity to drink coffee. My mom believed it to be unnecessary for children–understandably so, despite studies showing its health benefits.

            However, the times she did let me take a sip from her coffee mug were usually a regretful decision. The bitter taste, the strong scent, and the overall flavor were too overwhelming to even swallow. I’d often have to spit it out.

            But I’m biased. My mom made Folgers microwaveable coffee, without cream or sugar. Had the coffee been masked with heaps of sugar and half & half, I might have felt differently.

            Then again, after seeing this video I’m not so sure:
            http://www.rogersfamilyco.com/index.php/kids-hate-coffee-umm-yeah-really-funny-ways/

            Today, I have an addiction to the stuff. I drink coffee every morning, sometimes two cups if I know I’ll need it. And I love it. The only thing I don’t love about it is when I’ve taken my last sip.

            The most depressing thing is looking at the stained bottom of a coffee cup. It almost triggers nostalgia for the moment I first sat down with it.

            Almost.

            Featured photo credit: Kids Empowered/Kids Food Allergies Program via flickr.com

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            Last Updated on September 16, 2019

            How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

            How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

            You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

            We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

            The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

            Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

            1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

            Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

            For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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            • (1) Research
            • (2) Deciding the topic
            • (3) Creating the outline
            • (4) Drafting the content
            • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
            • (6) Revision
            • (7) etc.

            Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

            2. Change Your Environment

            Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

            One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

            3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

            Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

            Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

            My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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            Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

            4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

            If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

            Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

            I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

            5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

            I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

            Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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            As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

            6. Get a Buddy

            Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

            I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

            7. Tell Others About Your Goals

            This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

            For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

            8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

            What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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            9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

            If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

            Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

            10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

            Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

            Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

            11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

            At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

            Reality check:

            I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

            More About Procrastination

            Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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