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10 Delicious Recipes Made with Frozen Spinach

10 Delicious Recipes Made with Frozen Spinach

If you have a package of frozen spinach that’s been sitting at the back of your freezer for a while but you have no idea what to do with it, here are a few recipes that you can try out. By all means, feel free to experiment with them and customize them to suit your own leanings; these are just a few suggestions of how you can use the stuff.

Just as a note, ensure that the spinach is thawed out before you use it. Yes, that’s pretty much common sense, but it’s best to mention it anyway.

Smoothies

spinach smoothie

    For those of you who like to toss some greens into your smoothies, frozen spinach is pretty much ideal: you don’t have to worry about it wilting in your fridge, and you can even divide it into handy portions ahead of time so you can just defrost it and pop it into your blender when you’re making your favourite drink.

    If you’ve never added spinach to a smoothie before but would like to see what it’s like, try this combination: In your blender, combine 1 cup of chopped frozen mango, 1/2 a cup of frozen spinach, 1 teaspoon of grated fresh ginger, 1 tablespoon of fresh mint, and 1 cup of coconut milk. Puree that until it’s all blended well, and drink while still cold. This is a perfect smoothie for breakfast or as a refresher after a workout.

    Spinach Risotto

    spinach risotto

      Rather than cutting and pasting, let’s just send you to the original risotto recipe here. Once you’ve followed all the steps and your risotto is nearing completion, add 1 cup of drained, chopped frozen spinach and stir it in well until it’s warmed through and incorporated into the rest of the dish.

      Colcannon

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      colcannon

        This quintessential Irish dish is usually made with cabbage or kale, but it’s just as easy (and delicious) made with spinach instead.

        Peel 2 or 3 large russet potatoes and cut them into 1-inch cubes. Add them to a saucepan, cover with water, add a bit of salt, and simmer over medium heat until they’re fork-tender. While they’re simmering, drain a package of frozen spinach (about 2 cups’ worth), chop it very finely, and sautée it in 2 tablespoons of butter on medium heat for a minute or two. Add 1/3 to 1/2 a cup of milk, and keep simmering until the milk bubbles. Remove from heat, and set aside.

        Drain the cooked potatoes, pour them into a large bowl, and mash them thoroughly. Add the spinach mixture and combine thoroughly. Feel free to add a bit more milk and/or butter if you feel that they’re needed. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and eat while it’s warm. Leftovers can be made into patties and fried for breakfast the next morning.

        *Note: For a vegan version, use Earth Balance (or other vegan margarine) and soy milk instead of the dairy. 

        Vegetarian Crock Pot Lasagna

        lasagna

          Set this to cook in your crock pot before you leave the house to go run errands/take the kids to school, etc., and you’ll have an incredible dish waiting for you when you get home. We’re going to go for the quickest, easiest version available since few of us have much time to spare (or mental fortitude) first thing in the morning.

          Drain a package of frozen spinach and mix with a container of ricotta cheese. Season with salt and pepper ’til you’re happy with the taste. Take a jar of your favourite pasta sauce (store-bought or homemade) and spoon enough of it into the bottom of your crock pot to cover it well. Put down a double-layer of dry lasagna noodles, breaking them as needed to make them fit. Slather the noodles with a layer of the spinach/cheese mixture, and lay a single layer of dry noodles on top of that.

          Coat those in sauce, and top them with the vegetables of your choice: sliced mushrooms, eggplant, or zucchini all work really well in this. Top that with a bit more sauce, and add another layer of noodles. Guess what goes on top of that layer? More of the spinach and cheese mixture, topped with a final double-layer of noodles. Coat these with a thick layer of sauce, grate some mozzarella on top, and add some cracked pepper. Turn your crock pot on LOW and cook for 5-6 hours.

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          Artichoke and Spinach Dip

          artichoke and spinach dip

            Have there been any parties since 1950 in which this dip hasn’t been present? Probably not, and with good cause: it’s freaking amazing.

            Preheat your oven to 350F. Drain 1 can of artichoke hearts and either put them through a food processor until they’re finely chopped, or mince them by hand. Scoop that into a bowl and add 1 package of spinach (thawed, drained, and chopped finely), 1/2 a cup of sour cream or plain Greek yogurt, 2 tablespoons heavy cream, 1 cup of shredded mozzarella, and half a cup of parmesan cheese. If you like your dip garlicky, add 1/2 a teaspoon of raw, minced garlic. Blend all of these together, add salt/pepper to taste, and pour the mixture into a greased baking dish. Bake 20-25 minutes until it’s all bubbly and gorgeous, remove from the oven, and then hide somewhere with a bucket of tortilla chips or pita wedges so you can keep it all for yourself.

            Spanakopita

            Spanakopita

              It sounds like a fussy dish that requires a lot of work, but this Greek snack is actually super-easy to make. Cut phyllo pastry lengthwise into 2 or 3 long strips per sheet, and use a pastry brush or spatula to slather olive oil all over it. Drain a container of frozen spinach, chop it up finely, and mix it with a tablespoon of minced onions, and about half a cup of feta cheese. Season with salt and pepper, and adjust the onion/cheese if you think it needs a bit more.

              Place a heaping tablespoon of the spinach mixture in one corner of a phyllo sheet, and fold the bottom over to create a triangle. Keep folding back and forth in those triangle formations until you have a multi-layered triangular pocket of pastry with the spinach mix nestled happily in the centre.

              Stuffed Mushroom Caps

              stuffed mushroom cap

                If you’re ever at a loss for something to bring to a potluck party, just make a batch of these little guys and you’re set.

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                Preheat your oven to 350F. Take a dozen or so button mushrooms and pull the stems off. Wipe the tops clean with a dry cloth and then place them on a lightly greased baking sheet. Drain a package of frozen spinach, mince it very finely, and spoon it into a medium-sized bowl. Add in 1 cup of breadcrumbs, 1/4 cup of grated cheese (Fontina works amazingly well here), a pinch of thyme, and salt/pepper to taste. Beat an egg and add that to the bowl, then stir all ingredients until they’re well mixed.

                Fill each mushroom cap with this mixture, and then bake them for about 25 minutes until the mushrooms are tender and the filling is heated through. Crack pepper on top and serve warm.

                *Note: You can make an even simpler version of this by making a box of instant stuffing and adding the chopped spinach and a bit of cheese to it to use inside the caps.

                Spinach Omelette

                spinach omelette

                  This is one of those fabulous breakfast dishes that never goes out of style. To prep, just thaw a few tablespoons of frozen spinach, drain them well, and chop very finely. Mix this with 2-3 tablespoons of cheese, such as feta, chèvre, grated cheddar or gouda, or even brie. Season with salt and pepper.

                  For a single serving, crack 2 eggs into a bowl and beat well with a bit of salt and pepper. Feel free to add a dash of cayenne or Tabasco sauce if you like things spicy. Heat a small dab of butter in a non-stick pan (over medium heat), and stir it around with a spatula. When the butter begins to bubble, pour in the eggs and let them cook for a couple of minutes, pushing slightly on the edges with your spatula. When the edges of your omelet are firm and a light golden brown, sprinkle the spinach mixture on one side and use that spatula to fold the other side over to make a pocket.

                  Let this cook on low heat for a minute or so to allow the cheese to melt, and serve immediately.

                  Tomato, Spinach, and Tortellini Soup

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                  spinach soup

                    Soup one of the easiest dishes to make, and this one is perfect for a quick meal after work or school.

                    Sautee one small onion in a bit of olive oil until it turns translucent. Add about 6 cups of stock (vegetable or chicken—your choice), 2 chopped tomatoes, 1 cup of drained canned chick peas, and 1 cup of drained, chopped spinach. Simmer this on medium heat for about 5 minutes, and then add a couple of handfuls of fresh or frozen tortellini, and crank the heat up a bit. When it gets to a rolling boil, turn it down to low and simmer until the pasta is tender.

                    Season with salt and pepper, and feel free to adjust the flavours to suit your own tastes by adding things like a tablespoon of chopped fresh basil, or some grated Parmesan cheese. If you’re not feeling well, add some cayenne pepper or sriracha for a warming kick.

                    Creamed Spinach with Croutons

                    creamed spinach

                      Although the thought of creamed spinach might scare a few people off, this is actually a really lovely side dish that’s quick and simple to make, and is perfect for using up bread that might be going stale.

                      Take a few slices of bread, cut them into cubes, toss them with butter, salt, garlic powder, and a bit of pepper, and bake them at 350F until they’re golden. Set them aside. Drain and press 2 cups of frozen spinach, chop it finely, and then sautée it in butter with about a tablespoon of minced onion until the onion goes translucent. Add a pinch of nutmeg, a light splash of lemon juice, and a bit of salt/pepper. Remove from the heat, and stir in a few tablespoons of sour cream. If it seems a bit too thick, add milk a tablespoon at a time until it’s a consistency that you like. Serve with the croutons sprinkled on top as an accompaniment to grilled chicken, or roast beef.

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                      Catherine Winter

                      Catherine is a wordsmith covering lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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                      Last Updated on August 4, 2020

                      8 Benefits of a Minimalist Lifestyle That Get You to Live With Less

                      8 Benefits of a Minimalist Lifestyle That Get You to Live With Less

                      Minimalism is a way to put a stop to the gluttony of the world around us. It’s the opposite of every advertisement we see plastered on the radio and TV. We live in a society that prides itself on the accumulation of stuff; we eat up consumerism, material possessions, clutter, debt, distractions and noise.

                      What we don’t seem to have is any meaning left in our world.

                      By adopting a minimalist lifestyle, you can throw out what you don’t need in order to focus on what you do need.

                      I know first hand how little we actually need to survive. I was fortunate enough to live in a van for four months while traveling throughout Australia. This experience taught me valuable lessons about what really matters and how little we really need all this stuff we surround ourselves with.

                      Less is more.

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                      Living a minimalist lifestyle is reducing.There are a few obvious benefits of minimalism such as less cleaning and stress, a more organized household and more money to be found, but there are also a few deep, life-changing benefits.

                      What we don’t usually realize is that when we reduce, we reduce a lot more than just stuff.

                      Consider just some of the benefits of living with fewer possessions:

                      1. Create Room for What’s Important

                      When we purge our junk drawers and closets we create space and peace. We lose that claustrophobic feeling and we can actually breathe again. Create the room to fill up our lives with meaning instead of stuff.

                      2. More Freedom

                      The accumulation of stuff is like an anchor, it ties us down. We are always terrified of losing all our ‘stuff’. Let it go and you will experience a freedom like never before: a freedom from greed, debt, obsession and overworking.

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                      3. Focus on Health and Hobbies

                      When you spend less time at Home Depot trying unsuccessfully to keep up with the Joneses, you create an opening to do the things you love, things that you never seem to have time for.

                      Everyone is always saying they don’t have enough time, but how many people really stop and look at what they are spending their time doing?

                      You could be enjoying a day with your kids, hitting up the gym, practicing yoga, reading a good book or traveling. Whatever it is that you love you could be doing, but instead you are stuck at Sears shopping for more stuff.

                      4. Less Focus on Material Possessions

                      All the stuff we surround ourselves with is merely a distraction, we are filling a void. Money can’t buy happiness, but it can buy comfort. After the initial comfort is satisfied, that’s where our obsession with money should end.

                      We are bombarded by the media presenting promises of happiness through materialistic measures. It’s no wonder we struggle everyday. Resist those urges. It’s an empty path, it won’t make you happy.

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                      It’s hard not to get roped into the consumerism trap. I need constant reminders that it’s a false sense of happiness. I enjoy stuff, but I also recognize that I don’t need it.

                      5. More Peace of Mind

                      When we cling onto material possessions we create stress because we are always afraid of losing these things. By simplifying your life you can lose your attachment to these things and ultimately create a calm, peaceful mind.

                      The less things you have to worry about, the more peace you have, and it’s as simple as that.

                      6. More Happiness

                      When de-cluttering your life, happiness naturally comes because you gravitate towards the things that matter most. You see clearly the false promises in all the clutter, it’s like a broken shield against life’s true essence.

                      You will also find happiness in being more efficient, you will find concentration by having refocused your priorities, you will find joy by enjoying slowing down.

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                      7. Less Fear of Failure

                      When you look at Buddhist monks, they have no fear, and they have no fear because they don’t have anything to lose.

                      In whatever you wish to pursue doing you can excel, if you aren’t plagued with the fear of losing all your worldly possessions. Obviously you need to take the appropriate steps to put a roof over your head, but also know that you have little to fear except fear itself.

                      8. More Confidence

                      The entire minimalist lifestyle promotes individuality and self reliance. This will make you more confident in your pursuit of happiness.

                      What’s Next? Go Minimalism.

                      If you’re ready to start living a minimalist lifestyle, these articles can help you to kickstart:

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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