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6 Bold Reasons To Stop Wearing Makeup

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6 Bold Reasons To Stop Wearing Makeup

Two years ago I’ve stopped wearing makeup. I didn’t do it to make a statement or with some other particular reason in mind. I just felt that I don’t need it anymore. I did not want to seem prettier than I am with glossy eye-shadows or hide my imperfections under a thick layer of creams and foundation.

On the contrary, going all natural made me feel sexier and more self-confident.

To all you girls that do love wearing makeup, I mean no disrespect. However, here are six reasons why you may want to go make-up free for at least a week.

1. Your skin will thank you

Even if you don’t realize it, most of the makeup you wear is toxic. Cosmetic products are not subjected to the same checks as food or medicine before being released to the mass market. It is the sole responsibility of the manufacturer to decided whether a product is safe to use or not.

Unfortunately, a lot of them do contain harmful substances that get instantly absorbed by your skin. For instance, popular cosmetics ingredients such as sodium benzoate, propylene glycol and a number of other acids (not to mention parabens and carcinogens) cause allergic reactions on most skin types.

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Secondly, if you’d like to have the perfect blemish-free and glowing skin, covering it up with tons of foundation won’t help you with that. If you wear makeup all day, some of it will inevitably seep into your skin pores, causing them to enlarge and result in acne and blemishes.

2. You will have more free time

On average women in the US apply 17 beauty products before leaving the house and spend around an hour to get their looks together. Another study showed that women around the world waste 474 days of their lives applying makeup.

Just think for a second how many amazing things you could do instead – learn a new language, have more incredible travel experiences or master photography.

Once I stopped wearing makeup, I had one spare hour in the morning that I could either use to get extra sleep (which is delightful indeed) or turn into a productive activity like working on my blog or learning French.

Is there’s something you always wanted to start doing but never had time for? Well, why don’t you do it in the morning instead of applying your makeup?

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3. You will learn to love your flaws

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    Learning to love yourself and embrace your flaws is one of the biggest challenges everyone faces. At first, when you go makeup free, you’ll feel exposed. You are no longer hidden behind a fancy facade with all the pimples, freckles and other tiny defects you can’t tolerate disguised under a deep layer of powder.

    Do you want to know a secret? No one actually pays attention to your tiny imperfections except you! You should stop treating them like “flaws” and think of them as your “specialty.”

    4. You will be more at peace with yourself

    One of the most common things I hear from my girlfriends is that “Makeup makes me feel more beautiful.” The truth is – it shouldn’t!

    Last year Marc Jacobson models walked down the runway with no makeup; Cate Blanchett, Monica Bellucci, Eva Herzigova, Jessica Simpson and even Brad Pitt have been featured on top magazine covers with no makeup or Photoshop re-touсhing.

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    You should not allow anyone to judge you solely by how you look (and ditch those people who do!) or allow someone to get you down just because they have a different idea about how people should be presented.

    Giving up makeup is just another small step towards making peace with your body image and your soul.

    5. You will start feeling more confident

    Unfortunately, applying mascara and eye shadows will not help you boost your self-esteem and confidence. Instead of covering up yourself, you should focus on loving your natural look and embracing yourself. Your confidence will skyrocket once you learn to accept yourself the way you are.

    I used to think that if I were to stop wearing makeup, I would be considered less attractive and date-able by the opposite sex. In reality, I met my significant other while tripping through the moist Indonesian jungles.

    He thought I was beautiful from the first moment he saw me hiking up the volcano – all sweaty and red-cheeked. He has kept telling me that I’m beautiful every day since then.

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    Ditching the mindset that your self-confidence depends on your makeup, you will start building it up on the right principles: self-respect, positive attitude and competence

    6.  You will start appreciating life on a deeper level

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      Embracing your natural look is the foundation of a life rooted in simplicity and in harmony with yourself.

      Chasing trends and fighting to comply with social norms and beauty standards is exhausting. So is spending a huge chunk of money on beauty products in hopes they would make you feel “prettier” and thus “better,” yet leaving you feeling devastated instead.

      Remember, your looks do not define who you are. You are better than this and you are beautiful the way you are!

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      Going makeup free takes courage, but it’s a rewarding experience indeed.

      Featured photo credit: martinak15 via flickr.com

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      Elena Prokopets

      Elena is a passionate blogger who shares about lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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      Last Updated on January 27, 2022

      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

      Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

      “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

      Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

      Food is a universal necessity.

      It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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      Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

      Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

      Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

      Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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      The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

      Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

      This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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      Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

      Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

      Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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      So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

      Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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