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53 Fun Things You Can Do This Weekend

53 Fun Things You Can Do This Weekend

It can be easy to lapse into a predictable routine at the weekend, especially if you’re on a strict budget.

However, there are plenty of fun things to do on weekends! Here are 53 examples of activities to liven up your free time. They are cheap, fun, and entertaining, so give them a go!

Get Moving

1. Go For a Walk: A brisk walk is healthy and can be a fascinating pursuit.

2. Go For a Run: It’s free and great exercise.

3. Learn to Juggle: This fun and healthy pastime is a great way to impress your friends, and Lifehack’s guide can teach you the basics.

4. Go Swimming: Find your nearest leisure center and go for a swim.

5. Drum: You don’t need a drum kit – get some percussive objects and work out a groove. Just don’t blow anything up, like Keith Moon used to.

6. Dance: Turn on the radio, or stick on your iPod, and dance away to your favorite songs.

7. Community Sports: There are many community football, cricket, baseball or basketball teams you can join. Take advantage of the opportunity to meet new people whilst working out.

Check Out Your Local Community

8. Watch Wildlife: Heading out to a local park, or into the countryside, is a free way to see nature in action.

9. Head to the Playground: Most communities provide a free park replete with a playground. Those swings and seesaws are fun no matter how old you are.

10. Do Some Gardening: Head into your garden! If you live in a flat in the city you can check supermarkets for indoor potato or tomato growing bags and herb gardens.

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11. Car Boot Sales: Go to, or throw, a Car Boot Sale to interact with your community.

12. Check your Community Calendar: Visit your council’s website for details on upcoming events.

13. Join a Film or Book Club: Most film or literature fans will be able to find a weekly club. Here you’ll be able to meet like-minded people and discuss your hobby.

14. Visit Friends: Organize to meet with friends and spend the day talking and having fun.

15. Volunteer Work: Consider doing some volunteer work for a charity. As experience it can go on your CV, can introduce you to new people, and provide a welcome feel-good factor.

16. Visit Free Museums: Check your council’s official website for information about the free museums in your area.

17. Visit a Zoo or Wildlife Reserve: Visiting a local zoo or wildlife center is a terrific way to spend an afternoon – use a search engine to fine your nearest center.

18. Become a Dog Walker: Check locally to see if any busy neighbors need any of their pets walking, or put up an ad to be a dog walker.

19. Volunteer at a Race Track: Motor sport tracks always need marshals for their events. Volunteer to keep track safety at a premium.

Stay Indoors

20. Make Some Bread: A simple, cheap, and educational practice, here’s how to bake a loaf.

21. Pop Some Corn: A very easy, fun, and delicious cooking experiment. This is how to make Popcorn.

22. Organize a Budget Food Contest: Have friends round with the rules of cooking something for under $10. Mark the results and reward the winner.

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23. Netflix: Netflix.com is a very cheap online streaming video service. Sign up to watch amazing shows such as Breaking Bad and Arrested Development.

24. Free Films on YouTube: Typing “Full Movie” into a YouTube search brings up dozens of free films to watch. Check Rotten Tomatoes to gauge if they’re any good.

25. Go On a YouTube Marathon: It’s an amazing resource for fun and creative videos; go on a wild search for the funniest videos you can find.

26. BBC iPlayer (Europe Only): Europeans can enjoy the BBC’s programmes thanks to the iPlayer Global app. David Attenborough, Top Gear, Horizon, and QI (amongst others) await you.

27. Play Free Online Games: There are hundreds of free online games you can play. Check Lifehack’s Relaxing Games guide for a start.

28. Search Wikipedia: Knowledge seekers can take advantage of this incredible free encyclopedia. Pick a random topic and you can spend hours finding out fascinating facts.

29. Craigslist/Freecycle: Search your local Craigslist or Freecycle for information on free events. Search for your localized version online.

30. Blog: If you want to write digitally you can start a blog (free on sites like WordPress) and connect with the world.

31. Have a Board Game Day: Want a break from the internet? Try these classics: Monopoly, Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble, Chess, Risk, Cluedo, Checkers, Battleship, or Snakes and Ladders.

32. Make a Homemade Pizza: Follow Lifehack’s guide to perfect this treat.

Get Creative

33. Make a Paper Fortune Teller: Great fun for all ages, this simple activity creates you an amusing fortune teller. Follow this free guide and experiment away.

34. Play Pen and Pencil Games: Noughts and Crosses (tic-tac-toe), Hang Man, Battle Ships, and other classics can be easily played with a pencil and some paper.

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35. Play the Sentence Game: Take it in turns to write a sentence on a piece of paper. Fold the paper over after you’ve finished, and then supply one word on the next line for the following person. You can make some hilarious stories this way.

36. Make a Kite: Build a homemade kite to fly somewhere!

37. Have a Go at Origami: This traditional Japanese art form involves paper and skill – learn how to master it with websites such as Origami Instructions.

38. Draw: All you need is a pencil or crayons and some paper, then let your imagination run wild.

origami

    39. Write a Letter: Letter writing is a forgotten art. It’s more personal to write a letter to a friend or relative, and it’s always nice to receive one back.

    40. Raid Pinterest for DIY Ideas: Pinterest offers a myriad of ideas for design work. Have a look and see what you can make out of trash or cheap supplies.

    41. Volunteer at Your Local Theater: You can see if they take volunteers, such as ushers, for some additional experience.

    42. Audition for a Play: Take things a step further and audition for a local play.

    43. Creative Writing: A computer, or pen and paper, is all you need to be a writer. You don’t need to be Hemingway, just write whatever enters your head.

    Have fun with kids

    44. Play Hide and Seek: This is a terrific way to entertain your children, but it’s also fun if you’re adults with a gleefully immature streak!

    45. Hopscotch: Teach your kids how to play this classic game, or relive your youth by having a go again. Here’s a basic guide.

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    46. Build a Fort: The chances are you have a duvet or sofa. Cardboard boxes are also useful. Construct a mini-fort for yourself and your family and enjoy being childish for a day.

    fort

      47. Have a Kip: A 20 minute sleep can do wonders for your day, restoring energy and waking you up.

      48. DIY or Cleaning: Fix a wonky shelf, clean the flat, or wash your bedding. It burns calories and provides a feel good factor.

       

      49. Make Bubbles: You can go about this in different ways (such as buying a solution from a store), although you can make bubbles with household products.

      bubbles

        Learn Something New

        50. Listen to the Radio or Podcasts: Purchase a cheap radio, if you don’t already have one, and enjoy some free entertainment. It’s an often forgotten, but very enjoyable, service.

        51. Read: Reading is a great accompaniment to your life. Head to your local library for classics, and here’s a list of 20 books for inspiration.

        52. Learn a Foreign Language: Nothing is stopping you from taking up French, Japanese, Italian etc. Try Babbel or Verbalplanet for a wide range of language courses.

        53. Take an Online Course: You can learn anything you like at Coursera and Teachable. Just explore all the skills or interesting things you’d like to learn more about and take one of those courses.

        Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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        Alex Morris

        Content Manager, Copywriter, & Blogger

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        Last Updated on January 21, 2020

        The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

        The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

        Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

        your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

          Why You Need a Vision

          Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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          How to Create Your Life Vision

          Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

          What Do You Want?

          The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

          It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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          Some tips to guide you:

          • Remember to ask why you want certain things
          • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
          • Give yourself permission to dream.
          • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
          • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

          Some questions to start your exploration:

          • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
          • What would you like to have more of in your life?
          • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
          • What are your secret passions and dreams?
          • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
          • What do you want your relationships to be like?
          • What qualities would you like to develop?
          • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
          • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
          • What would you most like to accomplish?
          • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

          It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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          What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

          Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

          A few prompts to get you started:

          • What will you have accomplished already?
          • How will you feel about yourself?
          • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
          • What does your ideal day look like?
          • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
          • What would you be doing?
          • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
          • How are you dressed?
          • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
          • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
          • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

          It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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          Plan Backwards

          It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

          • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
          • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
          • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
          • What important actions would you have had to take?
          • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
          • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
          • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
          • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
          • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

          Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

          It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

          Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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