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15 Special Transports in the World that You May Have Never Imagined

15 Special Transports in the World that You May Have Never Imagined

Once the mankind invented the wheel, it immediately started thinking of more special transports to move around the Earth. Today you can still travel horseback to camelback, take a high speed train or jet aircraft, or take one of  these 15 incredible transports you may have never imagined.

1. Pig skin rafts, China

Pig Skin Rafs

    Simple floating rafts made of polished pork skins have been used in China for centuries. Yet, you can still ride one in the remote rural regions along the the Yanzte River!

    2. Underground Funicular, Turkey

    Tünel Istanbul

      Tünel funicular in Istanbul is the second oldest underground transportation in the world, after the London’s tube. The  573 meters tunnel with two station was opened to the public on January 17, 1875 and is still in function today! The trip in a fancy red carriage from Karaköy quarter to Beyoğlu will take just 1.5 minutes! 

      3. Totora Boat, Peru

      Totora boat

        These funky reed boats are among the oldest known types of boats known to the world! Today, totora boats are still in use among indigenous people living on the floating islands of Titicaca Lake (which are also made of totora reed). The boats vary in size from tiny fishing canoes to thirty meters long vessels! Traditionally shaped with a dragon head on the bow of the boat to ward off evil spirits.

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        4.  Chiva Express in Ecuador

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          Is it a bus or is it a train? It doesn’t matter much as the route goes through jaw dropping Andian scenery from Plaza Grande, in Quito, to Hacienda San Augustin, near Cotopaxi volcano! Unfortunately, the local officials banned the route a few years ago due to safety concerns.

          Yet, you can still ride las chivas at the rural roads of  Colombia, Bolivia, Venezuela and a few regions of Ecuador. Make sure you know how to work with your elbows as the bus-trains are usually loaded front-to-back and floor-to-ceiling with: packages of  bananas, coffee, chickens, pigs, dogs, cows, cats, and people.

          5. Mikrolet in Manado, Indonesia

          6289454237_43f425115c_b

            Now Mikrolet blue minivans can be seen in numerous Indonesian cities, however in Manado they’ve gotten to a way new level of awesomeness. Once it goes dark the drivers switch on all the neon and set the music out loud. Think really loud with huge woofing sub-buffers hidden under the last row of seats. The fair is less than 1$, making it the cheapest club on wheels I have ever seen.

            6. Amfibus, The Netherlands

            4344347372_5495dd05d3_o

              Amfibus is one of the main attractions in Rotterdam. Take a bus tour of the city for €24,50 and get splashed in the Maas River! Similar buses recently replaced River Clyde ferry crossing in Renfrew and Yoker, close to Glasgow City.

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              7. Bamboo train, Cambodia

              Bamboo Train

                Technically, it’s more like a square platform put on reused military tank wheels and equipped with an engine. Running between Phnom Penh and Battambang, the train is incredibly popular among the locals and primarly used for transporting all sort of stuff – from chickens to scooters. 

                8. Toboggan in Madeira, Portugal

                Toboggan Madeira

                  A transport for the true daredevils! How do you feel about taking a 2 kilometer ride down the crooked hill from Monte to Funchal neighborhood with a speed of 48 km/hour?

                  9.  Sauna boat, Sweden 

                  Sauna Boat

                    For those who love relaxing travel, head to Klädesholmen or Mälaren in Stockholm! You can travel up to 15 knots on water while taking all sort of spa treatments and soaking your skin in a warm sauna!

                    10. Outdoor escalator in Medellín, Colombia

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                    Escalator Columbia

                      The notorious city of Medellin (former murder capital of the world, controlled by Pablo Escobar) is steadily becoming one of the most progressive urban cities in Colombia! In 2011, the city opened a 85-meter long coveted escalator in Comuna Trece. Now the residents can travel up the hill to the newly built shopping area in just 6 minutes instead of taking an hour walk around the crooked lanes.

                      11 Jeepney, The Philippines

                      Jeepney

                        You hate them or love them, but you can’t completely ignore them! Kitsch and  loud jeepneys are everywhere around the Philippines. They vary in shape, size, and design, yet nearly always are tightly people-packed and driving at insane speed. Can you imagine, those used to be military jeeps during World War II?

                        12. Bicycle lift in Trondheim, Norway

                        Bicycle_lift_in_Trondheim_2 (1)

                          I love riding down the hill with wind whistling in my ears…but huffing and puffing up the hill doesn’t seem as fun to me. In Trondheim, you can use this awesome lift to get you all the way up to the top for free. Place your right foot on the starting point and keep the left foot on the bicycle pedal. After pushing the start button, a footplate emerges to get you pushed forward.

                          13. Tangah in Pakistan

                          Tanga

                            Tangah are high-seated carriages on two big wheels, pulled by one or two horses. It is definitely not the most comfortable mean of transportation (or the fastest), but incredible fun guaranteed!

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                            14. Dhow in Zanzibar

                            Dhow

                              Gracious dhow boats can often been seen around the Red Sea and Indian Ocean region. Originally, a traditional Arab sailing vessel, designed for transporting heavy items, like fruit, fish, people and cattle to the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula, Pakistan, India, today smaller dhows are used for fishing in the Indian Ocean all the way from Madagascar to the Bay of Bengal.

                              15.  Basket Boat in Vietnam

                              Basket Boat

                                These incredible basket boats, named as Thung Chai by the locals – are insanely valuable to their owners (mostly fishermen in central Vietnam).  I wonder how difficult it is to sail a boat like that?

                                Featured photo credit: randomix via flickr.com

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                                Elena Prokopets

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                                Last Updated on December 18, 2018

                                Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

                                Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

                                Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

                                Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

                                A couple of months ago, I met up with an old friend of mine who I hadn’t seen since last year. Over lunch, we talked about all kinds of things, including our careers, relationships and hobbies.

                                My friend told me his job had become dull and uninteresting to him, and despite applying for promotion – he’d been turned down. His personal life wasn’t great either, as he told me that he’d recently separated from his long-term girlfriend.

                                When I asked him why things had seemingly gone wrong at home and work, he paused for a moment, and then replied:

                                “I’m having a run of bad luck.”

                                I was surprised by his response as I’d never thought of him as someone who thought that luck controlled his life. He always appeared to be someone who knew what he wanted – and went after it with gusto.

                                He told me he did believe in bad luck because of everything happened to me.

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                                It was at this point, that I shared my opinion on luck and destiny:

                                While chance events certainly occur, they are purely random in nature. In other words, good luck and bad luck don’t exist in the way that people believe. And more importantly, even if random negative events do come along, our perspective and reaction can turn them into positive things.

                                Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

                                1. Stop believing that what happens in life is out of your control.

                                Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

                                Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

                                Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

                                Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

                                This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

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                                They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

                                Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

                                Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

                                What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

                                No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

                                When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

                                Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

                                2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

                                If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

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                                In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

                                Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.

                                It definitely wasn’t an easy time for her. She was stressful and tired. But it wasn’t bad luck that was playing the role.

                                Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

                                They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

                                Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

                                I explained to Kelly that to improve her fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to her; then try to focus on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

                                Then Kelly tried to review her current situation objectively. She realized that she only needed a short break for herself — from work and her just broken-up relationship. She really needed some time to clear up her mind before moving on with her work and life. When she got her emotions settled down from her heartbreak, she started to work on improving her business’ selling points and looked for new investors that are more suitable.

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                                A few months later, she told me that she finally found two investors who were really interested in her project and would like to work with her to grow the business. I was really glad that she could take back control of her destiny and achieved what she wanted.

                                Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

                                What’s Next?

                                Now that you’ve learned the 2 simple things you can do to take control of your fate and create your own luck. But this isn’t it! These simple techniques you’ve learned here are just part of the essential 7 Cornerstone Skills — a skillset that will give you the power to create permanent solutions to big problems in life — any problem in any area of your life!

                                If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over with these 7 Cornerstone Skills. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

                                How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

                                Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

                                “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

                                Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

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                                Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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