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15 Reasons Why Introverts Make The Best Travelers

15 Reasons Why Introverts Make The Best Travelers

Traveling seems like an activity made for outgoing people, right? The kind of people who don’t mind walking into a full bar and becoming the centre of attention.

I mean, you have to navigate your way around unfamiliar places, ask strangers for directions, and generally put yourself out there. It’s a scary thought if, like me, you’re a hard-core introvert.

But traveling is certainly not just for extroverts. In fact, introverts often get more out of travel because they are always well aware of their surroundings and where they fit in. Travel is such a personal endeavour and you learn so much about yourself in the process that it just makes perfect sense for introverts to be the best travelers.

So, why do introverts make the best travelers? You ask. Because…

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1. They can blend in with the crowds

There’s nothing an introvert likes more than blending in with the crowds. Sticking out like a sore thumb is a big no-no, and introverts have mastered the art of disappearing in unfamiliar places, immersing themselves in their surroundings and becoming one with a destination.

2. They listen to their surroundings

I’m not saying extroverts don’t, but it’s a well-known fact that introverts make much better listeners than talkers. This skill allows them to understand the complexities of foreign lands and begin to make sense of new cultures and different ways of living. They don’t push themselves onto places, instead they let places come to them.

3. They learn from watching

Introverts love watching from the side-lines, checking out what’s going on without being a part of the action. When traveling, they enjoy sitting outside with a drink and watching the world go by, soaking up the local lifestyle and learning the narratives of a place.

4. They know that travel isn’t about them (and they like it that way)

Introverts know that travel is part of a much bigger picture. Travel isn’t about the individual, but the experience, characters, and settings as a whole. They feel safe and much happier knowing that they aren’t the main character when they travel and are happy to play the part of an extra.

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5. They know that long journeys mean ‘me-time’

Travel often involves lots of long journeys, like overnight trains, long-haul flights, and lots of waiting around for buses and connections. Luckily, introverts savour this time, settling down with a good book or a notepad and reflecting on what they’ve seen so far.

6. They can be whoever they want to be

Introverts aren’t necessarily not confident. Instead, they recharge their batteries by being alone rather than in groups which can be quite draining. It’s also common knowledge that introverts often worry about what other people think of them. When traveling, though, there are plenty of opportunities for introverts to play at being extroverts amongst people they’ll never see again.

7. They can dip in and out of groups

Introverts enjoy spending time alone but they get lonely, too. Being able to enjoy quiet isolation and group activities is a great trait to have when traveling, because you never know when certain opportunities might arise. Introverts don’t mind missing out on all the action as they know there’ll be other chances later down the line, which means they don’t get burnt out after one week on the road.

8. They don’t rely on anyone else

Being self-sufficient is a must for traveling as you’ll often find yourself on your own without familiar faces to help you out. You’ll regularly have to rely on yourself to ensure you eat, sleep, and stay safe.

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9. They know how to be alone (and enjoy it)

Travel is not one amazing experience after the next, there is also a lot of downtime that comes with it, including spending lots of time alone. Introverts are well adept at being alone and relish the time they have to themselves.

10. They are happy to sit around and wait

It’s common knowledge that not everything goes to plan when traveling. In fact, very often things go wrong – a bus is delayed, you miss your connecting train, the list goes on. Introverts are happy to go with the flow and will pull out a good book to get stuck into whilst they wait, or simply watch the goings on unfold around them.

11. They aren’t afraid to do their own thing

Like I said earlier, travel is a hugely personal endeavour. When you’re on the road it’s easy to get caught up in what others want to do and miss out on ticking off your own bucket list. The great thing about introverts is that they don’t mind saying no to certain situations and peeling off on their own.

12. They like to challenge themselves (though sometimes they won’t admit it)

Introverts love learning, which means they also love learning about themselves. Getting out there and seeing the world is a big deal for someone who doesn’t like to put themselves out there, but they know that they’ll reap the benefits if they challenge themselves.

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13. They know that being an introvert doesn’t mean they’re not confident

So many people confuse being an introvert with having low self-esteem or rock-bottom confidence. This just isn’t true. Introverts are often strong people, not afraid to say what they think or do what they want, which are great skills to have when traveling.

14. They love listening to other people’s stories

If you meet an introvert on the road, don’t feel self-conscious about talking too much. They love listening to awesome stories and will be happy to sit for hours whilst you detail the ins and outs of your latest escapades. This is how introverts make friends on the road and they wouldn’t have it any other way.

15. They tend to spend longer in places getting to know all the layers

Introverts don’t like to rush from one place to the next. They prefer to soak up all the nuances of a place, immerse themselves in the culture, and explore everything they want to before they leave. This means they’re more likely to learn how to live like a local and scratch away at the layers of a destination whilst really getting to know it.

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15 Reasons Why Introverts Make The Best Travelers

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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