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10 Ways to Slow Down in a Fast-Paced World

10 Ways to Slow Down in a Fast-Paced World

Do you want to be happy, relaxed, and healthy? Of course! But maybe you don’t have time to go to a yoga studio or learn breathing exercises or meditation. Here are some simple ways you can add more peace and mindfulness to your regular, busy day.

Be present during chores

You’ve gotta do them anyway. Why not find a way to enjoy them? Take a moment to be present while handwashing those dishes that aren’t dishwasher-friendly. Feel the hot water on your hands, enjoy the soap bubbles, hear the clink of the cups. While you’re vacuuming, pay attention to each stroke, hear the dust and dirt getting sucked into the vacuum, enjoy the change from dirty carpet to clean! And while you’re de-cluttering, notice each object that you are picking up. Know that as you are clearing your space you are also clearing your mind.

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Turn off the car radio. Pull out the ear buds.

No need to completely block out your favorite tunes or radio programming, but give yourself an occasional break. Don’t be proud of not remembering how you got to work – that’s the sign of an over-busy mind! Focus on the scenery and the sounds of life moving by you. You might be surprised by landmarks you’ve never noticed before! And if you’re an exercise enthusiast, see if you can take your workout outdoors. Pull out those ear buds and give yourself a break from the talk and the music. Focus on what’s happening around you. Take in the air and the life around you. Notice the sound of your feet hitting the pavement, the feel of your legs pumping. Wave and smile at passerby. If you can coordinate, grab a friend or coworker to go with you. Having someone to talk to will get you out of your head and “to do” list and into the present.

Limit TV.

Sometimes I walk into a house and the TV is already on. It has become background noise, part of the family environment. It can also be quite a distraction.   I used to have the TV on while working, as motivating background noise. I discovered I was about 30 percent efficient when doing this. Enjoy the natural sounds of your home; be present for your family. Choose the specific shows you want to watch, and otherwise keep the TV off.

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Cut back on the e-mail checking.

E-mail is one of my big “go-to”s when I want to quick break from something I’m working on. And later I regret it. Decide ahead of time when you will be checking your e-mail. Even if you have to check it multiple times during the day, schedule those in.   It is a huge distraction that pulls you right out of the present moment – you’re either reminded about something you haven’t accomplished or worrying about something coming up in the future. Stick to the task that you’re accomplishing right now. Later you can mentally prepare yourself for organizing the onslaught of people and messages vying for your attention.

Be goal-oriented with social media.

Just like going into a store with a shopping list, make a list of what you plan to accomplish on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, etc. If you want to check in with some friends, go directly to their page or feed. Are you looking for some recipe ideas? Do a search. If you stick to the list, you’ll save a lot of time and keep your mind from getting scattered.

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Eat at the table.

Make dinner about the food (and company!) Keep the table clear of everything but food during dinner – no TV, no books, no phone, no paperwork or mail, no nothing! Then, focus on the food. Don’t just eat to eat. Make eating a meditative experience. Take in the smells, the appearance, every taste. Savor each bite as it enters your mouth and reaches your taste buds. Focusing on your senses brings you back to the present moment, with the added benefit of better digestion.

Count your steps.

Here’s an easy one! Count your steps, and stay in the present moment. No need to go crazy with the counting. Just keep counting up to 10 or 20. Count your steps down the stairs, to the kitchen, to your car, in to work, to the store – anywhere! Notice your pace. Are you rushed? Slow down your steps, relax your body, and take it all in.

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Take advantage of lines.

Not a fan of lines? Me neither! But what a perfect opportunity to slow down and relax. Take some deep breaths. Take in your surroundings. If you’re outdoors, soak up the rays. Maybe chat up the people around you – or people-watch!   While waiting in line for a chance to be a movie extra, I struck up a conversation with an actress that inspired me to immediately sign up for an improv class — an eye-opening, fantastic experience!

Mini-meditate during traffic stops and starts.

If there’s anything more frustrating than waiting in line, it is waiting in traffic or waiting for a train. Again, take advantage of this time! Concentrate on your breaths with each breath in and out. Count the vehicles or train compartments that pass.   Sometimes I’ll look to see who’s driving the vehicles that pass by or even pick a color or vehicle make to watch for. Enjoy this quick opportunity to slow down.

Take the scenic route.

Do you have an alternate route to work in case of bad traffic? Why not take it on a good traffic day? Or even just a slight detour down a parallel road? When we have a habitual way of doing things, our brains tend to go on auto-pilot and our concentration goes on vacation. Instead of giving your head an excuse to start worrying about work or those items on your “to do” list, take a route that forces you to pay attention. This can also apply to your walking routes. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park in a different parking spot. Sit in a different chair at the meeting. Pick a different spot in the living room.

And as far as that looming “to do” list, get it out of your head and onto paper as quickly as possible. Give it your undivided attention when you are ready for it. Keep your full attention in the present moment in everything you do, and you’re on your way to that happier, more peaceful you!

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Last Updated on November 20, 2018

10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

A new year beautifully symbolizes a new chapter opening in the book that is your life. But while so many people like you aspire to achieve ambitious goals, only 12% of you will ever experience the taste of victory. Sound bad? It is. 156 million people (that’s 156,000,000) will probably give up on their resolution before you can say “confetti.” Keep on reading to learn why New Year’s resolutions fail (and how to succeed).

Note: Since losing weight is the most common New Year’s resolution, I chose to focus on weight loss (but these principles can be applied to just about any goal you think of — make it work for you!).

1. You’re treating a marathon like a sprint.

Slow and steady habit change might not be sexy, but it’s a lot more effective than the “I want it ALL and I want it NOW!” mentality. Small changes stick better because they aren’t intimidating (if you do it right, you’ll barely even notice them!).

If you have a lot of bad habits today, the last thing you need to do is remodel your entire life overnight. Want to lose weight? Stop it with the crash diets and excessive exercise plans. Instead of following a super restrictive plan that bans anything fun, add one positive habit per week. For example, you could start with something easy like drinking more water during your first week. The following week, you could move on to eating 3 fruits and veggies every day. And the next week, you could aim to eat a fistful of protein at every meal.

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2. You put the cart before the horse.

“Supplementing” a crappy diet is stupid, so don’t even think about it. Focus on the actions that produce the overwhelming amount of results. If it’s not important, don’t worry about it.

3. You don’t believe in yourself.

A failure to act can cripple you before you leave the starting line. If you’ve tried (and failed) to set a New Year’s resolution (or several) in the past, I know it might be hard to believe in yourself. Doubt is a nagging voice in your head that will resist personal growth with every ounce of its being. The only way to defeat doubt is to believe in yourself. Who cares if you’ve failed a time or two? This year, you can try again (but better this time).

4. Too much thinking, not enough doing.

The best self-help book in the world can’t save you if you fail to take action. Yes, seek inspiration and knowledge, but only as much as you can realistically apply to your life. If you can put just one thing you learn from every book or article you read into practice, you’ll be on the fast track to success.

5. You’re in too much of a hurry.

If it was quick-and-easy, everybody would do it, so it’s in your best interest to exercise your patience muscles.

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6. You don’t enjoy the process.

Is it any wonder people struggle with their weight when they see eating as a chore and exercise as a dreadful bore? The best fitness plan is one that causes the least interruption to your daily life. The goal isn’t to add stress to your life, but rather to remove it.

The best of us couldn’t bring ourselves to do something we hate consistently, so make getting in shape fun, however you’ve gotta do it. That could be participating in a sport you love, exercising with a good friend or two, joining a group exercise class so you can meet new people, or giving yourself one “free day” per week where you forget about your training plan and exercise in any way you please.

7. You’re trying too hard.

Unless you want to experience some nasty cravings, don’t deprive your body of pleasure. The more you tell yourself you can’t have a food, the more you’re going to want it. As long as you’re making positive choices 80-90% of the time, don’t sweat the occasional indulgence.

8. You don’t track your progress.

Keeping a written record of your training progress will help you sustain an “I CAN do this” attitude. All you need is a notebook and a pen. For every workout, record what exercises you do, the number of repetitions performed, and how much weight you used if applicable. Your goal? Do better next time. Improving your best performance on a regular basis offers positive feedback that will encourage you to keep going.

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9. You have no social support.

It can be hard to stay motivated when you feel alone. The good news? You’re not alone: far from it. Post a status on Facebook asking your friends if anybody would like to be your gym or accountability buddy. If you know a co-worker who shares your goal, try to coordinate your lunch time and go out together so you’ll be more likely to make positive decisions. Join a support group of like-minded folks on Facebook, LinkedIn, or elsewhere on the internet. Strength in numbers is powerful, so use it to your advantage.

10. You know your what but not your why.

The biggest reason why most New Year’s resolutions fail: you know what you want but you not why you want it.

Yes: you want to get fit, lose weight, or be healthy… but why is your goal important to you? For example:

Do you want to be fit so you can be a positive example that your children can admire and look up to?

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Do you want to lose fat so you’ll feel more confident and sexy in your body than ever before?

Do you want to be healthy so you’ll have increased clarity, energy, and focus that would carry over into every single aspect of your life?

Whether you’re getting in shape because you want to live longer, be a good example, boost your energy, feel confident, have an excuse to buy hot new clothes, or increase your likelihood of getting laid (hey, I’m not here to judge) is up to you. Forget about any preconceived notions and be true to yourself.

  • The more specific you can make your goal,
  • The more vivid it will be in your imagination,
  • The more encouraged you’ll be,
  • The more likely it is you will succeed (because yes, you CAN do this!).

I hope this guide to why New Year’s resolutions fail helps you achieve your goals this year. If you found this helpful, please pass it along to some friends so they can be successful just like you. What do you hope to accomplish next year?

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