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10 Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

10 Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

There are certain messages that serve to get you “back to one” when you find you’re going off course. Whether you use tools such as a manifesto, a personal mission statement, a vision board or a list similar to Benjamin Franklin’s “13 Virtues”, taking the time to identify with one and then keeping it handy is worthwhile – and perhaps even imperative. But in a lot of cases you don’t have to “reinvent the wheel”; there are some awesome inspirational manifestos that have already put out there for you to look at and use as a means to set you back on course. Some come in the form of an image, some as a video, and some as nothing more than a blog post. One of those styles of presentation may resonate with you more than others, and yet you may want to have a selection to look at for the times where you need more than just a quick jolt of inspiration. In fact, some of these may be in the form of “pseudo-manifestos” in that they have only some elements of a manifesto that they focus on, but are powerfully delivered nonetheless. If you’re looking for inspiration, look no further. I’ve assembled 10 awesome inspirational manifestos right here for you to see.

1. The Holstee Manifesto

This is one of the best known ones on the web. It is a complete manifesto, not centering on one aspect in particular.

The Holstee Manifesto seems to have pioneered what could be termed as an “onslaught” of typography manifestos (and pseudo-manifestos), some of which are on this list and many of which are not. Yet there’s nothing quite like the original, is there?

    2. Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)

    Baz Luhrman, best known as the director of films like “Strictly Ballroom” and “Moulin Rouge!”, released this song back in 1999. The lyrics are straight from an essay by Mary Schmich from 1997 called “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young” and the song climbed music charts across the globe. Some wise words set to a catchy tune.

    3. the lululemon manifesto

    The corporate manifesto for thsi athletic wear company may very well be a bellwether for a shift in the culture of the new enterprising set. While

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    the lululemon manifesto does tie in what their employees should to do in order to be able balance both work and life (which are for many, essentially one in the same), it is worth aspiring to for those who don’t work for the company as well.

      4. Women in Business Manifesto

      While this one may be directed at women in business, it certainly can apply to a much larger demographic. The message conveyed by the Women in Business Manifesto is another example of typography imagery done well.

        5. Frank Lloyd Wright’s 10-Point Manifesto for His Apprentices

        This one also is directed at a certain group – and a very niche on at that. But again, Wright’s manifesto has much to offer anyone if they look beyond the group for which it was originally intended. There are some great attributes to strive for in there.

          6. Incomplete Manifesto for Growth

          Straight from the manifesto’s creator, Bruce Mau:

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          “This design manifesto was first written by Bruce Mau in 1998, articulating his beliefs, strategies, and motivations.”

          Apply this manifesto where you see fit, because it does fit in places suited for you.

            7. 279 Days to Overnight Success

            Chris Guillebeau’s “The Art of Non-Conformity” website is full of inspiration, and this downloadable PDF is no exception. If you’re a writer looking to take the steps to making it your full time vocation, this manifesto is worth the free download. If you’re not a writer, it’s worth it all the same.

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              8. The Expert Enough Manifesto

              This manifesto comes straight from the blog founded by Corbet Barr. The Expert Enough Manifesto illustrates what the site “is all about” — and it may hold things inside that you find that you’re all about as well.

                9. focus

                Leo Babauta, former Stepcase Lifehack contributor and creator of “Zen Habits”, has put together a simple and effective manifesto with the downloadable PDF known plainly as “focus”. Just make sure you don’t start reading it until you’re done with this list. After all, the theme of the manifesto is…focus.

                  10. The Passive Aggressive Manifesto

                  A response to the slew of typography-based manifestos on the web. Michael Schechter, one of Stepcase Lifehack’s newest contributors, created The Passive Aggressive  Manifesto with this in mind:

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                  “Let’s face it… words, no matter how pretty and sweet they might be, don’t really mean all that much if they don’t make you do anything.”

                  (Is it ironic that perhaps those manifestos which he spoofed prompted him to create this manifesto? Hmmm…) A fun and insightful read no matter how its creation was prompted.

                    BONUS: 6 More Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

                    These manifestos are also amazing; give them a look to see if you can glean anything from them to inspire you to action.

                    What manifestos do you find inspiration in and use to help you move forward? I’d be interested to hear your suggestions in the comments.

                    More by this author

                    Mike Vardy

                    A productivity specialist who shows you how to define your day, funnel your focus, and make every moment matter.

                    4 Simple Steps to Brain Dump for a Smarter Brain Why Is Productivity Important? 10 Reasons to Become More Productive Get What Matters Done by Scheduling Time Blocks The Ultimate Way to get to Inbox Zero How to Use a Calendar to Create Time and Space

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                    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                    1. Work on the small tasks.

                    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                    2. Take a break from your work desk.

                    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                    3. Upgrade yourself

                    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                    4. Talk to a friend.

                    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                    7. Read a book (or blog).

                    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                    8. Have a quick nap.

                    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                    9. Remember why you are doing this.

                    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                    10. Find some competition.

                    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                    11. Go exercise.

                    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                    12. Take a good break.

                    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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