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10 Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

10 Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

There are certain messages that serve to get you “back to one” when you find you’re going off course. Whether you use tools such as a manifesto, a personal mission statement, a vision board or a list similar to Benjamin Franklin’s “13 Virtues”, taking the time to identify with one and then keeping it handy is worthwhile – and perhaps even imperative. But in a lot of cases you don’t have to “reinvent the wheel”; there are some awesome inspirational manifestos that have already put out there for you to look at and use as a means to set you back on course. Some come in the form of an image, some as a video, and some as nothing more than a blog post. One of those styles of presentation may resonate with you more than others, and yet you may want to have a selection to look at for the times where you need more than just a quick jolt of inspiration. In fact, some of these may be in the form of “pseudo-manifestos” in that they have only some elements of a manifesto that they focus on, but are powerfully delivered nonetheless. If you’re looking for inspiration, look no further. I’ve assembled 10 awesome inspirational manifestos right here for you to see.

1. The Holstee Manifesto

This is one of the best known ones on the web. It is a complete manifesto, not centering on one aspect in particular.

The Holstee Manifesto seems to have pioneered what could be termed as an “onslaught” of typography manifestos (and pseudo-manifestos), some of which are on this list and many of which are not. Yet there’s nothing quite like the original, is there?

    2. Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)

    Baz Luhrman, best known as the director of films like “Strictly Ballroom” and “Moulin Rouge!”, released this song back in 1999. The lyrics are straight from an essay by Mary Schmich from 1997 called “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young” and the song climbed music charts across the globe. Some wise words set to a catchy tune.

    3. the lululemon manifesto

    The corporate manifesto for thsi athletic wear company may very well be a bellwether for a shift in the culture of the new enterprising set. While

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    the lululemon manifesto does tie in what their employees should to do in order to be able balance both work and life (which are for many, essentially one in the same), it is worth aspiring to for those who don’t work for the company as well.

      4. Women in Business Manifesto

      While this one may be directed at women in business, it certainly can apply to a much larger demographic. The message conveyed by the Women in Business Manifesto is another example of typography imagery done well.

        5. Frank Lloyd Wright’s 10-Point Manifesto for His Apprentices

        This one also is directed at a certain group – and a very niche on at that. But again, Wright’s manifesto has much to offer anyone if they look beyond the group for which it was originally intended. There are some great attributes to strive for in there.

          6. Incomplete Manifesto for Growth

          Straight from the manifesto’s creator, Bruce Mau:

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          “This design manifesto was first written by Bruce Mau in 1998, articulating his beliefs, strategies, and motivations.”

          Apply this manifesto where you see fit, because it does fit in places suited for you.

            7. 279 Days to Overnight Success

            Chris Guillebeau’s “The Art of Non-Conformity” website is full of inspiration, and this downloadable PDF is no exception. If you’re a writer looking to take the steps to making it your full time vocation, this manifesto is worth the free download. If you’re not a writer, it’s worth it all the same.

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              8. The Expert Enough Manifesto

              This manifesto comes straight from the blog founded by Corbet Barr. The Expert Enough Manifesto illustrates what the site “is all about” — and it may hold things inside that you find that you’re all about as well.

                9. focus

                Leo Babauta, former Stepcase Lifehack contributor and creator of “Zen Habits”, has put together a simple and effective manifesto with the downloadable PDF known plainly as “focus”. Just make sure you don’t start reading it until you’re done with this list. After all, the theme of the manifesto is…focus.

                  10. The Passive Aggressive Manifesto

                  A response to the slew of typography-based manifestos on the web. Michael Schechter, one of Stepcase Lifehack’s newest contributors, created The Passive Aggressive  Manifesto with this in mind:

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                  “Let’s face it… words, no matter how pretty and sweet they might be, don’t really mean all that much if they don’t make you do anything.”

                  (Is it ironic that perhaps those manifestos which he spoofed prompted him to create this manifesto? Hmmm…) A fun and insightful read no matter how its creation was prompted.

                    BONUS: 6 More Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

                    These manifestos are also amazing; give them a look to see if you can glean anything from them to inspire you to action.

                    What manifestos do you find inspiration in and use to help you move forward? I’d be interested to hear your suggestions in the comments.

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                    Science Says Screaming Is Good For You

                    Science Says Screaming Is Good For You

                    There are many reasons why people might scream – they’re angry, scared, or in pain (or maybe they’re in a metal band!). Some might say that screaming is bad, but here’s why science says it’s good for you.

                    “For the first time in the history of psychology there is a way to access feelings, hidden away, in a safe way and thus to reduce human suffering. It is, in essence, the first science of psychotherapy.” — Dr. Arthur Janov

                    Primal Therapy

                    Dr. Arthur Janov invented Primal Therapy in the late 1960’s. It is a practice that allows the patient to face their repressed emotions from past trauma head on and let those emotions go. This treatment is intended to cure any mental illness the patient may have that surfaced from this past trauma. In most cases, Primal Therapy has lead Dr. Janov’s patients to scream towards the end of their session, though it was not part of the original procedure. During a group therapy session that was at a standstill, Dr. Janov says that one of his patients, a student he called Danny, told a story that inspired him to implement a technique that he never would have thought of on his own.

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                    How it Started

                    “During a lull in our group therapy session, he told us a story about a man named Ortiz who was currently doing an act on the London stage in which he paraded around in diapers drinking bottles of milk. Throughout his number, Ortiz is shouting, ‘Mommy! Daddy! Mommy! Daddy!’ at the top of his lungs. At the end of his act he vomits. Plastic bags are passed out, and the audience is requested to follow suit.”

                    It doesn’t end there, though. Dr. Janov said that his patient was quite fascinated with that story, and that alone moved him to suggest something even he believed to be a little elementary.

                    “I asked him to call out, ‘Mommy! Daddy!’ Danny refused, saying that he couldn’t see the sense in such a childish act, and frankly, neither could I. But I persisted, and finally, he gave in. As he began, he became noticeably upset. Suddenly he was writhing on the floor in agony. His breathing was rapid, spasmodic. ‘Mommy! Daddy!’ came out of his mouth almost involuntarily in loud screeches. He appeared to be in a coma or hypnotic state. The writhing gave way to small convulsions, and finally, he released a piercing, deathlike scream that rattled the walls of my office. The entire episode lasted only a few minutes, and neither Danny nor I had any idea what had happened. All he could say afterward was: ‘I made it! I don’t know what, but I can feel.’”

                    Delving deeper

                    Dr. Janov says he was baffled for months, but then he decided to experiment with another patient with the same method, which lead to a similar result as before. The patient started out calling “Mommy! Daddy!” then experienced convulsions, heavy breathing, and then eventually screamed. After the session, Dr. Janov says his patient was transformed and became “virtually another human being. He became alert… he seemed to understand himself.”

                    Although the initial intention of this particular practice wasn’t to get the patient to scream, more than once did his Primal Therapy sessions end with the patient screaming and feeling lighter, revived, and relieved of stresses that were holding them down in life.

                    Some Methods To Practice Screaming

                    If you want to try it out for yourself, keep reading!

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                    • Step 1: Be Alone — Be alone. If you live in a place that you can’t be alone, it might be a good idea to talk to your family or roommates and explain to them what you’re about to do and make sure they’re okay with it. If you’re good to go, move on to step 2.
                    • Step 2: Lie Down — Lie down on a yoga mat on your back and place a pillow underneath your head. If you don’t own a yoga mat, you can use a rug or even a soft blanket.
                    • Step 3: Think — Think of things that have hurt you or made you angry. It can be anything from your childhood or even something that happened recently to make yourself cry, if you’re not already crying or upset. You could even scream “Mommy! Daddy!” just like Dr. Janov’s patients did to get yourself started.
                    • Step 4: Scream — Don’t hold anything back; cry and scream as loud as you can. You can also pound your fists on the ground, or just lie there and scream at the top of your lungs.

                    After this, you should return your breathing to a normal and steady pace. You should feel lighter, like a weight has been lifted off of you. If not, you can also try these other methods.

                    Scream Sing

                    Scream singing” is referring to what a lot of lead singers in metal or screamo bands will do. I’ve tried it and although I wasn’t very good at it, it was fun and definitely relieved me of any stress I was feeling from before. It usually ends up sounding like a really loud grunt, but nonetheless, it’s considered screaming.

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                    • Step 1 — Bear down and make a grunting sound.
                    • Step 2 — Hiss like a snake and make sure to do this from your diaphragm (your stomach) for as long as you can.
                    • Step 3 — Breathe and push your stomach out for more air when you are belting notes, kind of like you would if you were singing.
                    • Step 4 — Try different ways to let out air to control how long the note will last, just make sure not to let out too much air.
                    • Step 5 — Distort your voice by pushing air out from your throat, just be careful not to strain yourself.
                    • Step 6 — Play around with the pitch of your screams and how wide your mouth is open – the wider your mouth is open, the higher the screams will sound. The narrower or rounder your mouth is (and most likely shaped like an “o”), the lower the screams will sound.
                    • Step 7 — Start screaming to metal music. If you’re not a huge metal fan, it’s okay. You don’t have to use this method if you don’t want to.

                    If you want a more thorough walkthrough of how to scream sing, here’s a good video tutorial. If this method is too strenuous on your vocal chords, stop. Also, make sure to stay hydrated when scream singing and drink lots of water.

                    Scream into a pillow

                    Grab a pillow and scream into it. This method is probably the fastest and easiest way to practice screaming. Just make sure to come up for air.

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                    Always remember to make sure that you’re not going to disturb anyone while practicing any of these methods of screaming. And with that, happy screaming!

                    Featured photo credit: Sharon Mollerus via flickr.com

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