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12 Ways Your Passive-Aggressiveness Is Slowly Killing Your Relationships

12 Ways Your Passive-Aggressiveness Is Slowly Killing Your Relationships

Passive-aggressiveness is a learned response to the home life dynamic experienced in youth. The adult passive-aggressive grew up in a home with too many rules to count; strict, regimented laws, no chance at personal adventures. Youth who grow up like this come to believe that speaking their truth, or simply saying ‘no’ to something they don’t want to do, is dangerous, and will jeopardize their chance to receive love and affection from their parents or caregivers. This cycle will continue into adulthood, if never addressed.

Passive-aggressiveness includes the obvious passive, withdrawn or apathetic approach to relationships. This approach will spill over into all sort of adult relationships, from friendships, intimate partners, school and on to the workplace.

Passive-aggressiveness never serves anyone well, and will only harm the passive-aggressive persons themselves, and those relationships they truly wish to cultivate.

Passive-aggressive is a personality type with an indirect expression of hostility.

    The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has classified passive-aggressiveness as many things throughout the years.

    It first appeared in 1952. Since then, it’s been called a ”personality style”, ”hidden hostility”, a ”defense mechanism”, a ”personality disorder” and ”negativistic.” Regardless of how you view it, or which title you prefer, it’s a confusing and harmful defense that leaves both sides less clear on their relationship. This cloudy communication style is detrimental to any relationship.

    Here are 12 ways our passive-aggressiveness is slowly killing our relationships.

    The passive-aggressives don’t let people know how they really feel or what they really want.

      When you hold back from speaking up or clarifying where you stand on an issue, your passive-aggressiveness is triggered because you feel scared, unsafe or concerned that doing so will mean you no longer will receive the approval of the person you want to impress or be liked by.

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      This passive-aggressive pattern is dangerous in a relationship because if the person you are in a relationship with doesn’t know what you really think or want, they are not really in a relationship with you, as you truly are. With time, this only becomes more detrimental to your relationship. You will feel resentment at living phoney and forcing yourself to walk on eggshells. They will feel they don’t really know you. And in fact, they don’t.

      These are two very big red relationship flags and some of the worst feelings one can feel in any relationship: unaddressed resentment and communicating like a stranger.

      Meditate on this thought by Daphne Rose Kingma,

      ”Make sure it’s your true self you are showing. Because it’s your true self that needs love.”

      The passive-aggressives forfeit special connections with people they like out of fear of conflict.

      Passive-aggressiveness always chooses conflict avoidance, because you have come to experience conflict or disagreement as terrifying. It doesn’t have to be. Your past may have provided limited occasions at self-expression.

      The passive-aggressive certainly wants to connect with those they admire and respect, but often feel they have no tools to do so. When a passive-aggressive begins to feel attachment or real love for one who has inspired them, it’s common practise to retreat and forfeit the connection because of the fear that something will go wrong or of that they will be perceived rejection.

      Passive-aggressive people will often break their own hearts, constantly giving up on relationships or experiences that open them up to any potential for failure, intimacy or heightened risk of rejection, even though it’s the very relationship or experience they truly want to pursue.

      The passive-aggressives give up before they try.

      For many years, I heard my parents’ opinions in my head before I made a decision. I stepped away from my own dreams, desires or other exciting prospects because I could hear their critique instead of my own. I was filled with dread and fear whenever I had to make a firm plan or answer to a pressing matter.

      Accepting advice from family is not an inherently bad thing. Of course, hearing out others counsel can be very beneficial, indeed. But when other’s opinions on what is ”right”, ”good” or ”appropriate” or what they would do in their own life consistently surpasses your own, you are not developing your own soul compass and decision-making skills.

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      You are living an inauthentic existence. You are experiencing life through others, and not even attempting things you want to do because your parents, other family members, friends or colleagues told you that you will fail.

      The passive-aggressives keep choosing the “easy” way out because they think it will avoid pain.

      If you identify yourself as a passive-aggressive or are starting to think you may be, or are experiencing passive-aggressiveness in your relationships or decision-making, you are familiar with doing things sub-par, half-hearted or out of convenience.

      The choice that you believe provides you with minimal discomfort or pain. You think it’s “easy” but it’s not. You believe that this way you won’t expose yourself too much.

      The fear always lurking around the corner for a passive-aggressive is that by succeeding or going out on a limb, will open them up to rejection, failure, ridicule or criticism. Passive-aggressiveness will always stunt your spirit.

      The passive-aggressives mistake an honest and respectful dialogue with malicious confrontation.

      Any direct dialogue, to some degree, is a terrifying prospect to a passive-aggressive person. All dialogue is confused with pain, discomfort, and other overwhelming emotions of the past.

      Confrontation, in almost any form, is a trigger for the passive-aggressive. It can make them recall their childhood or other experiences of their past, when confrontation was peppered with insults and obscenities or an unresponsive party.

      What the passive-aggressive doesn’t quite understand is that being assertive, not aggressive, can help empower a bond or relationship. If the passive-aggressive, goes out of their comfort zone, and attempts to have a honest and respectful dialogue, and is met with resistance or abusive tactics, there may be other issues at play in the relationship that are being ignored.

      It’s not uncommon for the passive-aggressive to get involved with co-dependents, narcissists, domineering and demanding or other inappropriate partners due to their passivity and low self-esteem.

      The passive-aggressives imagine the worst-case scenario even when things are positive in a relationship.

      Passive-aggressives are often seen by those that know them as complainers who never make any changes. They can be contrary, fatalistic and overall negative. According to The Angry Smile workbook,[1] a passive-aggressive individual may make comments like, ”It doesn’t pay to be good” or “Good things don’t last.”

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      Passive-aggressive people have come to believe that not only does the worst-case scenario always happen to them, but that it’s what they deserve. This is another example of the damaged self-confidence of a passive-aggressive.

      The passive-aggressives keep recycling the old ways of dealing with complicated situations.

      Because the passive-aggressive doesn’t think they have many tools to deal with the ups and downs of relationships, they rely on old patterns or what they saw parents or siblings or friends do in their relationships. If you let it, the cycle will continue on, with no end.

      Don’t recycle the same lines you used in a past relationship. Not only is it dishonest but prevents you from being present and aware to the relationship troubles you are experiencing.

      The passive-aggressives prolong an annoyance or disagreement.

      Passive-aggressive people are often waving like a flag in the wind. Back and forth, they sway from one direction to the other, intensely conflicted.

      Prolonging a decision, a change that needs to be made or a disagreement they’ve ignored, only morphs into a terrible beast to be slain later. The passive-aggressive sometimes hopes the problem will go away, without them having to maturely confront the issue at the hand.

      Your prolonging for what ails you will not benefit you. You will be faced with it again days, weeks, months, or years later.

      The passive-aggressives repress, deny and ignore their true thoughts and feelings.

      Repressing your true thoughts and feelings is dangerous. The passive-aggressive doesn’t realize the harm they are inflicting upon themselves and those around them. This is another emotionally dishonest way the passive-aggressive maintains relationships.

      The passive-aggressives burn bridges.

      Passive-aggressiveness burns bridges. They don’t build them. They fear the end result and incorrectly believe that all ends bad, anyway, so who cares?

      This is very harmful to all relationships because this only isolates the passive person. And others feel naturally less connected to them.

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      Passive-aggressives believe that appearing to be polite and cooperative on the surface is the same as building good rapport with others. All the while their true opinions are festering beneath the surface. This is not the same as a good relationship with others.

      The passive-aggressives say ”yes” to every request and then blame others for making them do things they don’t want to do.

      In the psychology guide book, The Angry Smile, the authors write that passive-aggressives will say yes to things they don’t want to do and then blame and resent the person for making them do something. This, like all the other behavioral patterns of a passive-aggressive allows problems to escalate.

      Stop agreeing to things that you don’t want to do or don’t believe in or that no longer serves you. The more yes’s you utter, the deeper you fall into your passive-aggression, and the more trapped, obligated and unhappy you become.

      The passive-aggressives are ambivalent and indecisive, following the lead of every one else but themselves.

      Passive-aggressives will often look to their supervisor, parent or spouse to tell them what to do even though they resent it. When their supervisor, parent or spouse changes their opinion, they are confused.

      Many times, the passive-aggressive doesn’t find refuge in their own heart and mind, but instead spends a great deal of energy avoiding things. Placing their direction on another person makes it hard for the passive-aggressive to find resolution.

      What the passive-aggressive hasn’t yet taken to heart is that others’ ideas may change. If you rely on others to make your decisions or tell you what to do, you will never find peace.

      To deal with passive-aggressiveness, it’s not just about talking it out.

      When it seems to be so obvious that “talking it out” is the key to dealing with passive-agressiveness, it’s not. Because it’s a lot more about how you talk, no matter if you are a passive-aggressive person, or are currently dealing with any of them.

      Practice assertive communication.

      Assertive communication means standing up for your own opinion in a calm, respectful and positive way, without being either aggressive, or passively accepting “wrong”. When you’re assertive, you listen to another person’s opinion, acknowledge their presence and validate their feelings, instead of accusing or blaming them. You’re showing your understanding and willingness to sort things out, trying to achieve a “win-win” situation.

      Recognize that the emotion of anger is not a bad thing.

      California-based therapist and emotion expert Andrea Brandt, Ph.D. says,[2]

      “Anger has many positive qualities: It tells us when something is wrong, it can help you in terms of getting you to focus, evaluate your values and goals and strengthen your relationships and connections,”

      We’re human beings, we have emotions. It’s totally okay to feel angry. Expressing emotions doesn’t make you weak, ignoring them does. When you are angry about something, express it and address it directly with the assertive communication skills.

      Reference

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      Last Updated on August 12, 2019

      13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

      13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

      Mentally strong people have healthy habits. They manage their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors in ways that set them up for success in life.

      Take a look at these 13 things that mentally strong people don’t do so that you too can become mentally stronger.

      1. They Don’t Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves

      Mentally strong people don’t sit around feeling sorry about their circumstances or how others have treated them. Instead, they take responsibility for their role in life and understand that life isn’t always easy or fair.

      2. They Don’t Give Away Their Power

      They don’t allow others to control them, and they don’t give someone else power over them. They don’t say things like, “My boss makes me feel bad,” because they understand that they are in control over their own emotions and they have a choice in how they respond.

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      3. They Don’t Shy Away from Change

      Mentally strong people don’t try to avoid change. Instead, they welcome positive change and are willing to be flexible. They understand that change is inevitable and believe in their abilities to adapt.

      4. They Don’t Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control

      You won’t hear a mentally strong person complaining over lost luggage or traffic jams. Instead, they focus on what they can control in their lives. They recognize that sometimes, the only thing they can control is their attitude.

      5. They Don’t Worry About Pleasing Everyone

      Mentally strong people recognize that they don’t need to please everyone all the time. They’re not afraid to say no or speak up when necessary. They strive to be kind and fair, but can handle other people being upset if they didn’t make them happy.

      6. They Don’t Fear Taking Calculated Risks

      They don’t take reckless or foolish risks, but don’t mind taking calculated risks. Mentally strong people spend time weighing the risks and benefits before making a big decision, and they’re fully informed of the potential downsides before they take action.

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      7. They Don’t Dwell on the Past

      Mentally strong people don’t waste time dwelling on the past and wishing things could be different. They acknowledge their past and can say what they’ve learned from it.

      However, they don’t constantly relive bad experiences or fantasize about the glory days. Instead, they live for the present and plan for the future.

      8. They Don’t Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over

      Mentally strong people accept responsibility for their behavior and learn from their past mistakes. As a result, they don’t keep repeating those mistakes over and over. Instead, they move on and make better decisions in the future.

      9. They Don’t Resent Other People’s Success

      Mentally strong people can appreciate and celebrate other people’s success in life. They don’t grow jealous or feel cheated when others surpass them. Instead, they recognize that success comes with hard work, and they are willing to work hard for their own chance at success.

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      10. They Don’t Give Up After the First Failure

      Mentally strong people don’t view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

      11. They Don’t Fear Alone Time

      Mentally strong people can tolerate being alone and they don’t fear silence. They aren’t afraid to be alone with their thoughts and they can use downtime to be productive.

      They enjoy their own company and aren’t dependent on others for companionship and entertainment all the time but instead can be happy alone.

      12. They Don’t Feel the World Owes Them Anything

      Mentally strong people don’t feel entitled to things in life. They weren’t born with a mentality that others would take care of them or that the world must give them something. Instead, they look for opportunities based on their own merits.

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      13. They Don’t Expect Immediate Results

      Whether they are working on improving their health or getting a new business off the ground, mentally strong people don’t expect immediate results. Instead, they apply their skills and time to the best of their ability and understand that real change takes time.

      More About Mental Strength

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