Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 26, 2020

30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits

30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits

Let’s face it, we’re all searching for the secret to success to get the edge, secure that promotion, and move effortlessly toward the direction of our aspirations. If this sounds like you, rest assured it’s human nature to want more and to look for shortcuts to self-mastery.

The truth is that finding the motivation to build good habits is what differentiates the mediocre from the extraordinary. If you are willing to apply disciplined daily action in pursuit of your goals with consistency, you will see remarkable results. But we all know this, there’s nothing new here.

When we dig a little deeper, it turns out that it’s the rituals we create in our daily lives that keep us ascending the stairway to success, which sees us rise to our fullest potential and produce at an elite level.

Research conducted by University College London demonstrates that it takes 66 days to install a habit or to reach automaticity—the point where a habit has been integrated and can be performed automatically without willpower.[1]

The key to attaining this is maintaining the willpower to succeed in the days and weeks preceding automaticity, and this is where most people fail. Sometimes, all you need is a little push or flash of insight from an inspirational quote.

Below are 30 of the most potent, life-changing habit quotes that will supercharge your focus, keep you locked on building good habits, and give you that extra boost to create radical transformation in your life.

Let’s get started…

Find Your Deeper Why’s (What’s Driving You?)

“People tell me all the time, well I’m just not a morning person. You either hate waking up because you go to bed way too late, or because you don’t know the reason you’re getting out of bed.”

―Ryan Serhant

“Definiteness of purpose is the starting point from which one must begin”

―Napoleon Hill

“It’s not about who you are today, it’s about who you want to become and the price you are willing to pay to get there.”

―Tom Bilyeu, Founder Impact Theory

“And actually, it’s not repetition that creates habits. It’s emotions that creates habits.”

―Rangan Chatterjee

The Bigger Picture (What Do You Want for Your Life?)

“Success, like happiness, cannot be pursued. It must ensue. And it only does so as the unintended side of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself.”

―Viktor Frankl

“I’d tell men and women in their mid-twenties not to settle for a job or a profession or even a career. Seek a calling. Even if you don’t know what that means, seek it. If you’re following your calling, the fatigue will be easier to bear, the disappointments will be fuel, the highs will be like nothing you’ve ever felt.”

―Phil Knight, Shoe Dog

“Do the best you can, until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.”

―Maya Angelou

“I can and I will. Watch me.”

―Carrie Green, Female Entrepreneur Association

Visualizing Your Future Self (Who Will You Become?)

“Success is not to be pursued; it is attracted by the person you become.”

―Jim Rohn

“I’m going to make a difference in the world, you don’t believe it, but say it a million times and you’re going to end up believing it. I’m meant to do something special with my life, there’s no way in the world god put me on this planet to just be a regular guy, no way, the blood in here’s boiling, I want to do some big with my life. This guy was put on the planet to make a difference. Say it over, and over, and over, and over, and over again, convince everybody in the world, the entire time you’re just trying to convince one person, and that is you.”

―Patrick Bet David, Valuetainment

“Set a goal, not only to follow world-class role models, but to become a world-class role model.”

―Steve Siebold, Author

Always do your best. Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgement, self-abuse and regret.”

―Don Miguel Ruiz

The Heart of the Matter (Action Inspires Motivation)

“The price of greatness is responsibility.”

―Winston Churchill

“Each day is an opportunity to craft your best life. Each day brings a chance to choose your greatness.”

―Robin Sharma

“Many people want to change their life, but they are not will to change their choices, and ultimately this changes nothing.”

―MJ DeMarco, The Millionaire Fastlane

“What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while”.

―Gretchen Rubin

How to Play the Game (of Life)

“We must be willing to roll the dice and lose. Prepare, at the end of the day, for none of it to work.”

―Ryan Holiday

“As long as you live, keep learning how to live.”

―Seneca

“The Goldilocks Rule states that humans experience peak motivation when working on tasks that are right on the edge of their current abilities. Not too hard. Not too easy. Just right.”

―James Clear, Atomic Habits

“The law of life is the law of belief.”

―Joseph Murphy, Ph.D.

“Go the extra mile, it’s never crowded.”

―Jay Shetty

“Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth that ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favour all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now.”

―Goethe

“Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart.”

―Confucius

Give Your Gift to the World

“There will never be anyone exactly like you. You were given special gifts and talents to share with the world, and even though everybody has special gifts and talents, nobody will use theirs quite the same way you do.”

―Jen Sincero

“At some point, the pain of not doing it becomes greater than the pain of doing it.”

―Steven Pressfield, The War of Art

“There is a place that you are to fill and no one else can fill, something you are to do, which no one else can do.”

―Florence Scovel Shinn, The Game of Life

“Don’t be in the business of playing it safe. Be in the business of creating possibilities for greatness.”

―Robert Iger, Chairman of Disney

Having Faith (in the Journey)

“May you see a clear sign that your prayers are working and unfolding.”

―Idil Ahmed

“I let go of my need to control and allow the universe to do her thing.”

―Gabrielle Bernstein

“When you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.”

―Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

Final Remarks

I hope you find these quotes about habits useful and inspirational. As we’ve discovered, finding the motivation to sustain the practice of building good habits is worth it. The difference is a multifactorial approach that combines your deepest desires, playing the game of life, connecting with your future self, and believing it is all possible for you.

Installing good habits is where you’ll create your ultimate advantage. The good news is that if you can keep it up for 66 days despite the constant demands of life, you’ll reach automaticity.

When you acknowledge this powerful driver within yourself and tap into it daily, you become an unstoppable force for good and open the doorway for remarkable things to happen.

Advertising

Now is the time to take charge of your life and step through the doorway to success daily.

More Tips About Building Good Habits

Featured photo credit: Pietro De Grandi via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Tim Castle

Bestselling Author, Coach and Co-Founder of My Book Habit

30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits How To Embrace Change In Life (Even If It’s Hard to Change)

Trending in Habit

1 How to Become an Early Riser and Stay Energetic 2 30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits 3 10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult 4 10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful 5 Why Is Behavior Change So Hard? Science Explains It

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 26, 2020

Too Much On Your Plate? 7 Ways to Tackle It

Too Much On Your Plate? 7 Ways to Tackle It

Do you ever feel like you’re crossing off tasks from your never-ending “to-do” list and yet get to the end of your day feeling like you didn’t make significant progress?

Your new marketing plan takes a backseat. The much needed “you time” is put off until next week. The exciting new idea you’ve been working on can wait until life gets less hectic.

You have too much on your plate but unsure of what to do. In a world where we value the pursuit of more—ideas, tasks, actions—what if you were able to shift to valuing less, putting your energy towards what really matters?

There is a way, one where you take control back. Here, you identify what matters most. You make deletion a habit. You leave the cult of busy and value priorities instead of random actions.

In this article, you’re going to learn how to manage the feeling that you always have too much on your plate. Most importantly, you’ll get your mental sanity back while being able to make progress on what matters to you.

1. Delete the Clutter—Literally

As you read this, there is physical, mental, and emotional clutter that is robbing you of precious energy from what really matters. This manifests itself in myriad ways.

Your workspace makes it impossible to focus. Your calendar has recurring meetings that expired months ago. You haven’t had that one conversation that keeps you anxious. In other words, your next level of growth starts with subtraction.

We tend to overestimate how much we can get done while underestimating the amount of time and energy things will take. Researchers call this the “planning” fallacy.[1] The result is that in trying to do too much, we fall short every time.

Instead, start by deleting something today:

  • Donate old clothes.
  • Clear the clutter in your home office.
  • Tell your college friends in the text message thread that you’re going to be away for a while.
  • Scan your calendar for any worn-out obligations that are consuming your precious time, energy, and attention.

While many productivity experts will stack new actions, habits, and routines to your schedule, you’re going to do the opposite. By deleting things out of your life, you create some much-needed breathing room. With this newfound perspective, you can now identify what matters.

Advertising

2. Identify Your “Big 3” Priorities

We tend to overvalue new ideas, projects, and initiatives because they provide a tantalizing dopamine hit of possibility. Not being able to set your priorities straight results in having too much on your plate.

  • The new marketing campaign is a can’t miss for doubling profits.
  • The collaboration with someone we admire has unlimited potential.
  • The new podcast we’re launching will turn us into our industry’s top expert.

Right?

Well, not always. Due to the planning fallacy we mentioned above, we often say yes to way too much at once, which means we scatter our limited energy and focus across too many domains.

Instead, take a minimalist approach to your life, career, and business. In any given quarter or “season,” pick one, two, or three main priorities.  These are typically not urgent, yet vitally important projects that move the needle in a significant way. They are not half-hearted tasks, random initiatives, or “fake work”. They are connected to your bigger goals and matter to you.

If you’re having trouble identifying your “Big 3,” write down at least 15-20 possibilities that could be one. Then, take a step back, and highlight the most important ones.

Going forward, you’ll now be able to filter your decision-making by asking a question—will this next task, meeting, action serve one of those priorities?

Granted, not everything you do all day will. But this alone will help you with making better and faster decisions, establishing boundaries, and taking control back of what matters. When you do, you’ll start winning your day with daily, consistent action.

3. Win the Day With 1% Progress

The conventional wisdom of personal growth and self-help have sold you a false myth—the illusion that every day must be a rousing success. Hopped up on motivation, it’s easy to buy into this narrative and yet, sustained success is about consistent action steps compounded over long periods of time.

Enter the 1% rule, which operates under the Japanese philosophy of Kaizen—defined as steady, continuous improvement. Using this rule, you’ll make daily progress a habit and tap into the number one human motivator.

Research by Harvard professor Teresa Amabile and psychologist Steven Kramer dove into why people stay motivated at work. In analyzing 12,000 diary entries where they tracked their emotional state various times a day, they came to one conclusion—it’s not money, it’s not security, and it’s not approval. Progress is more important than anything else.[2]

Advertising

To harness what is called the progress principle’, break down the priorities from step two into the smallest possible action.

For example:

  • Instead of “create a marketing plan”, start with the first step—brainstorm marketing ideas for twenty minutes.
  • Instead of “launch website”, choose to complete a draft of your About Me page.
  • Instead of “grow the business”, choose to make three extra sales calls on any given week.

Progress triggers dopamine in the brain, which makes motivation surge, and the cycle repeats itself. One percent today and tomorrow start to accumulate, and incremental growth turns into exponential. To make this a consistent practice, you’re going to lower the bar to get started.

4. Lower the Bar to Get Started

We’ve all found ourselves staring at a blank cursor at the local coffee shop, primed to do important work, and then realized that 55 minutes went by and we got nothing done.

Why? Getting started is always the hardest part, and it’s much harder when you have too much on your plate. Whether that’s your workout routine or working on your priorities, resistance is always highest right before you start.

Borrowing the term from how chemical compounds change at different thresholds, psychologists call this term “activation energy”.[3]

This is a fancy way of saying the energy it takes for you to go from thinking about doing something to doing it. The higher the volume of the task, the longer the wait to get started or, in many cases, we put it off entirely.

Instead, you’re going to play a trick on yourself:

  • Instead of a 45-minute time-block, commit to doing 10 minutes.
  • Instead of a 3-mile run, commit to two loops around the block.
  • Instead of cleaning your home, commit to getting the closet done.

By lowering the bar, you’ll take the pressure off yourself. And, as you’ll notice, once you’ve started, it’s much easy to keep going.

5. Double Your Rate of Saying No

No decision you make is ever in a vacuum. The coffee meeting you agreed to early in the morning means you said “no” to your morning workout. We tend to say yes freely without thinking about the consequences until we’re stuck at a networking mixer or Zoom catch-up we don’t want to be in.

Advertising

However, the most important word you can use in the pursuit of taking stuff off your plate is “no.”

Here are two questions to ask yourself when receiving a request or opportunity are:

  • If this was tomorrow morning, would I still say yes? We tend to say yes to anything that is a few weeks or months out.
  • If I say yes to this, what am I saying no to, and is it worth it? This simple question allows you to be aware of the cost.

Saying no creates instant clarity. It deletes “open loops” in our heads and honors some much-needed boundaries. Most importantly, it gives you the time, energy, and bandwidth to pour yourself into your priorities.

Of course, this does not mean you will neglect parts of your life you enjoy. Rather, you will do so with discernment. Otherwise, you will say “yes” to anyone and everyone at your expense.

Instead, say “yes” to yourself first. Say yes to your goals. Say yes to your priorities. Say yes to your creative time before you agree to someone else’s needs and agendas.

6. Leave the Cult of Busy

The cult of busy consumes your precious energy and thrives on making you a card-carrying member who pays their dues with exhaustion, scattered progress, and burnout. Busyness has become a societal badge of honor—a ‘tell’ to let others know you’re important. It’s as if having too much on your plate is a good thing.

However, is busy actually working? On a long enough timeline, busy leads to overwhelm, distraction, and a lot of social media scrolling. To leave the cult of busyness is a courageous act, and it starts with your language.

Research has shown that language provides a look into our beliefs. If we believe we are always busy and don’t have enough time, it’s easy to procrastinate and self-sabotage on what matters.

Next time you want to tell the world how busy you are and how hectic life seems to be, catch yourself. Shift your language, use words like prioritized, focused, committed—and watch how these shift your emotional state.

7. Celebrate Wins Every Day

You’re the worst person in the world to recognize your growth. It’s a bold statement, but I can say that with confidence because I am, too. We all are. We are masters at focusing on what’s not working and the “gap” between today’s reality and our future selves.

Advertising

Furthermore, we often discount the goals we worked hard to attain. We brush them off once we’ve achieved them and quickly move onto the next.

It’s time to take control back and celebrate at least three wins every day. These are not about grand moments, it’s about the small ways you showed up. This is essential to helping yourself when you have too much on your plate.

If you want to unlock this even further, identify the ‘ingredient of success’ for your win.

For example:

  • Your win was to show up for your early morning workout, the ingredient is discipline.
  • Your win was to have a tough conversation with someone, the ingredient is honesty.
  • Your win was to publish something before you felt ready, the ingredient is courage.

Why does this matter?

Celebrating small wins has been shown to amplify motivation in our personal and professional lives.[4] By writing these down, you’ll recognize the places where you are growing and are already accumulating the ingredients of your next success.

It’s Time to Take Stuff Off Your Plate

We’ve all felt like we have too much on our plate at some point—and things seem to be getting worse, not better. There are more tasks to do. There are more social media platforms to post and comment on. More inputs are competing for our attention that never seem to end.

The reality is that unless you take control of this now, it will only get worse. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

  • You can delete clutter every day.
  • You can get clear on your priorities.
  • You can choose to leave the cult of busy.

Once you do, you’ll start to value less, not more. You’ll accumulate winning days more often. You’ll learn how to set boundaries and recognize a distraction disguised as a shiny opportunity.

Best of all, you’ll get to the end of your days knowing you are moving forward in your life and business. During these times, nothing could be more important or relevant.

More Tips to Help You End Overwhelm

Featured photo credit: Tetiana SHYSHKINA via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Exploring the “Planning Fallacy”: Why People Underestimate Their Task Completion Times
[2] Harvard Business Review: The Power of Small Wins
[3] Psychology Today: Activation Energy: How It Keeps Happiness at a Distance
[4] Harvard Business Review: The Power of Small Wins

Read Next