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Last Updated on November 26, 2020

30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits

30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits
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Let’s face it, we’re all searching for the secret to success to get the edge, secure that promotion, and move effortlessly toward the direction of our aspirations. If this sounds like you, rest assured it’s human nature to want more and to look for shortcuts to self-mastery.

The truth is that finding the motivation to build good habits is what differentiates the mediocre from the extraordinary. If you are willing to apply disciplined daily action in pursuit of your goals with consistency, you will see remarkable results. But we all know this, there’s nothing new here.

When we dig a little deeper, it turns out that it’s the rituals we create in our daily lives that keep us ascending the stairway to success, which sees us rise to our fullest potential and produce at an elite level.

Research conducted by University College London demonstrates that it takes 66 days to install a habit or to reach automaticity—the point where a habit has been integrated and can be performed automatically without willpower.[1]

The key to attaining this is maintaining the willpower to succeed in the days and weeks preceding automaticity, and this is where most people fail. Sometimes, all you need is a little push or flash of insight from an inspirational quote.

Below are 30 of the most potent, life-changing habit quotes that will supercharge your focus, keep you locked on building good habits, and give you that extra boost to create radical transformation in your life.

Let’s get started…

Find Your Deeper Why’s (What’s Driving You?)

“People tell me all the time, well I’m just not a morning person. You either hate waking up because you go to bed way too late, or because you don’t know the reason you’re getting out of bed.”

―Ryan Serhant

“Definiteness of purpose is the starting point from which one must begin”

―Napoleon Hill

“It’s not about who you are today, it’s about who you want to become and the price you are willing to pay to get there.”

―Tom Bilyeu, Founder Impact Theory

“And actually, it’s not repetition that creates habits. It’s emotions that creates habits.”

―Rangan Chatterjee

The Bigger Picture (What Do You Want for Your Life?)

“Success, like happiness, cannot be pursued. It must ensue. And it only does so as the unintended side of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself.”

―Viktor Frankl

“I’d tell men and women in their mid-twenties not to settle for a job or a profession or even a career. Seek a calling. Even if you don’t know what that means, seek it. If you’re following your calling, the fatigue will be easier to bear, the disappointments will be fuel, the highs will be like nothing you’ve ever felt.”

―Phil Knight, Shoe Dog

“Do the best you can, until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.”

―Maya Angelou

“I can and I will. Watch me.”

―Carrie Green, Female Entrepreneur Association

Visualizing Your Future Self (Who Will You Become?)

“Success is not to be pursued; it is attracted by the person you become.”

―Jim Rohn

“I’m going to make a difference in the world, you don’t believe it, but say it a million times and you’re going to end up believing it. I’m meant to do something special with my life, there’s no way in the world god put me on this planet to just be a regular guy, no way, the blood in here’s boiling, I want to do some big with my life. This guy was put on the planet to make a difference. Say it over, and over, and over, and over, and over again, convince everybody in the world, the entire time you’re just trying to convince one person, and that is you.”

―Patrick Bet David, Valuetainment

“Set a goal, not only to follow world-class role models, but to become a world-class role model.”

―Steve Siebold, Author

Always do your best. Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgement, self-abuse and regret.”

―Don Miguel Ruiz

The Heart of the Matter (Action Inspires Motivation)

“The price of greatness is responsibility.”

―Winston Churchill

“Each day is an opportunity to craft your best life. Each day brings a chance to choose your greatness.”

―Robin Sharma

“Many people want to change their life, but they are not will to change their choices, and ultimately this changes nothing.”

―MJ DeMarco, The Millionaire Fastlane

“What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while”.

―Gretchen Rubin

How to Play the Game (of Life)

“We must be willing to roll the dice and lose. Prepare, at the end of the day, for none of it to work.”

―Ryan Holiday

“As long as you live, keep learning how to live.”

―Seneca

“The Goldilocks Rule states that humans experience peak motivation when working on tasks that are right on the edge of their current abilities. Not too hard. Not too easy. Just right.”

―James Clear, Atomic Habits

“The law of life is the law of belief.”

―Joseph Murphy, Ph.D.

“Go the extra mile, it’s never crowded.”

―Jay Shetty

“Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth that ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favour all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now.”

―Goethe

“Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart.”

―Confucius

Give Your Gift to the World

“There will never be anyone exactly like you. You were given special gifts and talents to share with the world, and even though everybody has special gifts and talents, nobody will use theirs quite the same way you do.”

―Jen Sincero

“At some point, the pain of not doing it becomes greater than the pain of doing it.”

―Steven Pressfield, The War of Art

“There is a place that you are to fill and no one else can fill, something you are to do, which no one else can do.”

―Florence Scovel Shinn, The Game of Life

“Don’t be in the business of playing it safe. Be in the business of creating possibilities for greatness.”

―Robert Iger, Chairman of Disney

Having Faith (in the Journey)

“May you see a clear sign that your prayers are working and unfolding.”

―Idil Ahmed

“I let go of my need to control and allow the universe to do her thing.”

―Gabrielle Bernstein

“When you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.”

―Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

Final Remarks

I hope you find these quotes about habits useful and inspirational. As we’ve discovered, finding the motivation to sustain the practice of building good habits is worth it. The difference is a multifactorial approach that combines your deepest desires, playing the game of life, connecting with your future self, and believing it is all possible for you.

Installing good habits is where you’ll create your ultimate advantage. The good news is that if you can keep it up for 66 days despite the constant demands of life, you’ll reach automaticity.

When you acknowledge this powerful driver within yourself and tap into it daily, you become an unstoppable force for good and open the doorway for remarkable things to happen.

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Now is the time to take charge of your life and step through the doorway to success daily.

More Tips About Building Good Habits

Featured photo credit: Pietro De Grandi via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Tim Castle

Bestselling Author, Coach and Co-Founder of My Book Habit

8 Most Important Life Skills For Adults To Build 10 Best Self-Help Podcasts To Listen To Right Now 12 Things to Do When You Have No Motivation to Do Anything The Real Reason Why You Experience a Loss of Interest in Life 30 Powerful Quotes to Motivate You to Build Good Habits

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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