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Last Updated on January 12, 2021

7 Simple Ways to Cope with Stress at Work and Stop Worrying

7 Simple Ways to Cope with Stress at Work and Stop Worrying

The internet today is booming with posts promoting work-for-self, work-from-home, and living your passion and purpose. Quite frankly, the spike in this content has good merits! We are fed up with the stress and demands that are placed on us by other people and the companies that we work for.

According to the American Institute of Stress, numerous studies show that job stress is far and away the major source of stress for American adults and that it has escalated progressively over the past few decades.[1]

Blueprints, step-by-step guides, and road maps are taking over Pinterest and every social media platform regarding this new way of living. However, what about everyone who is still living and dealing with the current stress and worries at work?

How can we healthfully deal with our 9-5 jobs and leave the office feeling refreshed and energized after we put in our 8 hours? I am here to tell you that it is possible and relatively easy to not only cope with stress at work but make a difference and fulfill your passions anywhere you work!

Here are a few really simple ways for coping with stress at work and STOP worrying.

1. Identify and Take Back Control of Your Stress

Sometimes, we bulk our stress and worry into a broad category of “I HATE MY JOB” when in all reality, there are only a handful of things that are causing us grief.

Get specific – What are your top 3 worries & stressors at work?

Get clear and investigate why these are causing so much angst.

For instance, it is probably not all administration and/or your boss’s fault that you are stressed out, worried, and dreading work (don’t give them too much credit). When we put all of our blame on someone or something out of our control, then we have no power to change it (no power = STRESS)!

The best way to gain power over a stressful situation is to reverse the complaint, worry, or problem to something that YOU can change.

Does that mean that you blame yourself when it’s not your fault? Absolutely not!

But you MUST put yourself in the driver’s seat so that you can change the stressful situation.

Once you are clear on what is causing your heart palpitation’s and night sweats (I have had them), then you control the situation by taking any complaint or blame and turn it into a SOLUTION.

Your boss is unfair and never gives you the day off when you request it? (Total jerk move, by the way!)

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How are you currently requesting off? If you are requesting off electronically, could you make the request personal and far in advance so that end result is what you desire?

Complaining that your boss is a jerk will make you feel better in the moment but, it isn’t going to give you the solution that you really want. And by complaining, you are giving up ALL control.

When we feel in control of what we want, the majority of our stress is released. It is when we feel out of control that we worry!

2. An Attitude of Gratitude

Gratitude is the freeway to happiness and contentment. There is no room for worry, stress, or negativity when we are in a thankful mindset.

When you begin to feel stressed at work, when the workload keeps piling up and it seems like nothing will ever get done… Take a minute to breathe deeply, close your eyes, and whisper thank you to the first thing that pops into your mind.

Thank you for today, thank you for the security this job provides, thank you for the breakroom coffee, thank you for anything you can think of!

The combination of a quiet moment and an attitude of gratitude can turn your whole day around and it is the perfect cocktail for comfort and relaxation!

3. Identify Your Weaknesses

We all have them and most of us avoid them. But it is so important to come to terms on what we can change and improve.

When we are able to improve our downfalls, then we can only progress forward.

Never accept your weaknesses as a part of your DNA and/or character. Weaknesses are only temporary if we work to improve them.

When we accept them, then they become ingrained in us and will forever hold us down. Don’t let that happen!

Get comfortable with failures and embrace your weaknesses. Never be afraid of asking powerful questions because the more that you know the more places you’ll go! (Love you, Dr. Seuss!)

Identify the areas at work that could use some improvement and then brush up in this area. Find ways to grow and learn!

New research from LinkedIn finds that people who genuinely enjoy their jobs have one thing in common:[2]

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“They make time to learn on the job. The LinkedIn research surveyed about 2,000 professionals. They found that employees who spend time learning at work are 47% less likely to be stressed”

Take a professional development course to become an expert in your area of weakness. Ask questions to someone in the office with more expertise in this particular area (they will most likely be happy to help). This will help to build your confidence and confidence kicks stress’s butt every time!

As a takeaway, never shy away or hide from your weaknesses. Instead, embrace them to gain confidence and leave worry in the dust!

4. Identify Your Strengths

Up next, ask yourself: What are my top 10 strengths?

Don’t be modest and name them all. I actually encourage you to name your top 50 strengths because I know that we all have them.

Circle the strengths that are unique to you and use this edge at work to amaze people.

Don’t just fit in at work – stand out! Better yet, pick a strength that is unique and that you are passionate about and you will leave work feeling refreshed!

By expanding your skill set, in both your strong and weak areas, creates intelligence and confidence. Both are great for combating stress and worry!

5. Prioritize and Revitalize

What is a necessity this week? Deadlines, meetings, paperwork?

Prioritize by when it needs to be done and, next to the task write down an estimated time of how long it will take to complete.

Calculate the total of time it will take you to accomplish these necessities and, then carve out 10% of your day to REVITALIZE. No one can work all day and give it their all without a reset.

What is it that gets you into the zone, what energizes you? Add restoration breaks in your day.

For me, lunch with my coworkers doesn’t restore me in the least bit. Often times, the conversations that go on at work bring me down in the dumps and drain my energy.

On my restoration breaks, I listen to a motivational video, turn out the lights, journal, walk, go outside and plan my future, make lists of how I am going to accomplish my next goal.

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I can’t stress enough how important these are to the soul. Add SOUL RESTORATION into your schedule!!

Your boss/employer will appreciate all of the extra energy you have when you come back from this break.

6. To Do ListSSS (Yes, 3 S’s for 3 Lists!)

This is nice because it piggybacks off of your priority list. What absolutely needs to get done today and how long will the task take?

When you arrive at work and you are comfortable in your chair, grab 3 pieces of paper, a pen, and a sharpie. Take a deep breath, this is your time to organize all of your thoughts and to-dos.

Write down what needs done today, in the order you plan to accomplish it. Most of the time, I even give myself a window of time to complete.

After you have finished a task, cross it out. I love to take a big black sharpie and put a big slash through my completed task (this makes me so happy!)

However, by lunch, my paper looks messy and then that makes my mind messy so it causes me stress. Therefore, I do this thing that really helps me to reduce my stress and it organizes my mind.

I make a new list.

After lunch, write another list. Brand new and fresh. Write down everything else that needs accomplished for the rest of your afternoon.

This is your chance to set your afternoon up for organization and success as opposed to a stressful, scattered mess!

If you didn’t accomplish something in the morning – no big deal. You can put that task on your afternoon list or your list for tomorrow.

A list for tomorrow? Yes, your THIRD list!

At the end of the day, create your final list that consists of what needs to be done for the following day. This strategy will help get you focused and organized for the next day and reduce your worry because it’s on paper and out of your mind. This will also help you the following morning to give you an idea of how to structure your day.

Anyway that we can organize our minds and structure our day for efficiency is a sure way of reducing stress and worry in the workplace!

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7. Stay Away from the Negative Nancy Squad

Have you ever worked somewhere with negativity?

Have you experienced something similar to this: You begin a new job and the Negative Nancy Zombies come with their Frankenstein arms to greet you.They make sure to tell you who to stay away from, that the cafeteria food is awful, all of the affairs in the office, and how you’ll probably end up working late for the next 100 years of your life. They reassure you, however, if you stick with them that you’ll be just fine…

I am here to tell you that it is BULL-OGNA!

Don’t fall into this trap! Don’t be a part of this soul sucking practice.

The Negative Nancy squad is burned out and they need to take a day off to rejuvenate (maybe even take the month off). The squad would probably benefit from this article about the burn out point at work.

Most of the time, the person they tell you to stay away from is awesome, the food is halfway decent, the affair is actually just two people being friendly, and the squad only has to stay late because they are too busy gossiping.

To make a long story short, if you have a good outlook and positive perception, everything in your work environment will look and feel brighter!

Don’t align yourself with or hang out with those type of people. Don’t gossip or assume anything about anyone until you have experienced it first-hand.

We often make things seem worse (more stressful and worrisome) in our minds. The Negative Nancy squad will only enhance these negative emotions. So, find a few positive friends, go out of your way for a few people at work, and maybe even get to know someone new and your social game at work will be great!

Having positive relationships at work will make you feel happier and more secure in your work environment. Positive relationships are great for your health and mind so embrace developing constructive relationships with your coworkers.

Final Thoughts

Make the decision that you are going to enjoy yourself at work. Anything can be made exciting with the right attitude and a little creativity.

Find one or two things to look forward to each day and treat yourself every once in awhile. You deserve to enjoy your work, your life, and the people in it.

Remember that if you are above ground, then it’s a good day and something exciting is always just a mindset shift away!

More About Stress

Featured photo credit: Christian Erfurt via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] The American Institute of Stress: Workplace Stress
[2] Linkedin: Stress at Work Report: Who is Feeling It the Most and How to Combat It

More by this author

Jacqueline Battaglia

Growth Coach, Blogger, and Creator of Life is Duck Soup. My approach will help you get to your next potential level, follow your HAPPY path and enjoy each moment fully.

Nothing Makes You Happy: Here’s Why and What to Do 7 Simple Ways to Cope with Stress at Work and Stop Worrying 3 Steps to Truly Know Your Value and Realize It in Life 13 Ways Happy People Think and Feel Differently

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Last Updated on January 15, 2021

How to Cope With the Stages of Grief and Heal After Loss

How to Cope With the Stages of Grief and Heal After Loss

The death of a loved one is, unfortunately, something most of us have experienced or will experience at some point in our lives, but grief and loss are not felt only when someone passes away. You may move through the stages of grief quickly or slowly, and you may even find yourself moving back to a stage you thought you had passed. People grieve differently, and there is no correct way to grieve in any situation.

A close friend or family member moving away, a divorce or breakup, loss of a job, as well as a number of other life experiences can cause feelings of grief or loss. Coping with loss is one of the most stressful and difficult things we have to deal with in life, but it is an experience everyone can relate to.

The Stages of Grief

The five stages of grief—denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance—are related to the common emotions we go through when we experience loss. This grief model was identified by psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in 1969[1].

However, because everyone is different, there is no “standard” way to react to grief and loss.[2]

Some people will wear their emotions on their sleeves and be outwardly emotional. Others will experience their grief more internally, and may not cry. You should try not to judge how a person experiences grief, as each person will experience it differently.

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Stages of grief

    Stage 1: Denial

    The feeling of shock when you first find out about a loss can lead to thinking, “This isn’t real.” This is a temporary way to deal with the rush of overwhelming emotion and a defense mechanism for your mind.[3]

    Stage 2: Anger

    Feelings of frustration and helplessness take hold during this stage. Thoughts like “It’s not fair” can be common. Even being angry at your loved one who died for “leaving you behind” is natural. This anger can spill over into your close relationships, and you can find yourself getting angry at those around you for no apparent reason.

    Stage 3: Bargaining

    During this stage, you are constantly thinking about what you could have done to prevent the loss. Thoughts of “What if…” and “If only…” replay in the mind. You might also try to bargain with a higher power in hopes of reversing the loss.

    Stage 4: Depression

    This stage brings the deep sadness you feel as you realize the loss is irreversible. You think about how your life will be affected by the loss. Crying, loss of appetite, feelings of loneliness, and unusual sleeping patterns are all signs of depression.

    Stage 5: Acceptance

    You accept the loss, and although you’re still sad, you slowly start to move on with your life and settle in to your new reality.

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    The stages of grief don’t have to be in this order, and you might not experience all stages. There is also no set time period for grieving, and some people take longer to heal than others.

    How to Heal From Grief and Loss

    When you’re experiencing those heartbreaking feelings and the stages of grief, it’s hard to believe that you’ll eventually heal, but you really will. Here are some ways to help the healing process:

    1. Confront the Painful Emotions

    Try not to bottle up your emotions. Allow yourself to express how you feel. It’s a healthy part of the grieving process.[4]

    If you’re not ready to get together with friends and family to talk about how you’re feeling, you can work with your emotions through mindful meditation, which can help create space for you to take a look at what you’re feeling and why.

    2. Talk About It

    When you’re ready and have entered the final stages of grief, talking to someone about the way you are feeling can be very helpful in starting the healing process. Often, people want to isolate themselves while grieving, but being around friends and family can help. Talking can also help you to confront your emotions if you have been unable to.

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    3. Keep up With Your Routine

    Loss can make you feel like your world has been turned upside down. As you move through the stages of grief, getting through your daily routine may feel more difficult, which can cause you to put self-care to the side. Keeping up with your routine can help bring back some normality and ensure you are showing yourself love and consideration.

    4. Take Care of Yourself

    When you are grieving and depressed, simple things like eating become an afterthought, and sleeping may become difficult. Taking care of yourself and your health will help with the healing process.

    While you may not do everything you were doing before your loss, try to do one act of self-care each day. It can be taking a long bath, going for a walk, making a nice meal, or even practicing a hobby once you feel ready. It doesn’t have to be anything complicated; it just needs to be something that makes you feel good.

    5. Don’t Make Any Major Decisions

    Grief clouds the ability to make sound decisions.[5] Try to postpone making any big decisions for a while or get guidance from close friends or family if you can’t put it off.

    Grief may also make you feel like making major changes to your life, such as quitting a job or ending a relationship. Try to remember that now is not the best time to make these changes, and hold off further consideration until you have moved through all of the stages of grief.

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    The Bottom Line

    It is important to heal after a loss so that you can get on with life. There is no set time period for grieving, but if you feel that your grief isn’t getting better, and you are unable to accept the loss, it might be time to seek advice from a mental health professional.

    In the meantime, accept that now is a difficult time, but that it will get better. Time will inevitably help and make the pain less powerful. One day, you will wake up and realize the pain is simply a small echo in the back of your mind and that you have successfully moved through each of the stages of grief. It’s time to get back to your life.

    More on Dealing With the Stages of Grief

    Featured photo credit: Ben White via unsplash.com

    Reference

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