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Published on June 20, 2018

18 Fun Activities for Kids to Do on a Rainy Day

18 Fun Activities for Kids to Do on a Rainy Day

For energetic and restless kids, being cooped up inside can be a damper. The same toys and books can get boring quickly. It may be tempting and easy to resort to screen time to keep your kids entertained but there are so many other activities that are much more beneficial for their development and creativity.

These activities don’t have to involve expensive materials or a complicated set-up. Using many things that you already have in a new and innovative way will keep your kids happy AND keep their minds engaged, away from the screens.

1. Create a cardboard town

Do you have an abundance of cardboard boxes laying around that need to be recycled? Encourage your kids to use them to build a cardboard town.

By using different sized boxes, the town can include a bridge, a park and train tracks. Incorporate toys that you already have on hand, such as blocks, trucks and toy animals. The structures can be decorated with markers and stickers to truly make it their own.

2. Start a family band

Do your kids love banging on their musical instrument toys and making a ruckus? Get the whole family involved and play music together. You can use real instruments that you own like a keyboard or guitar.

Don’t forget to incorporate household items such as pots and pans, wooden spoons and anything else that makes noise![1]

3. Make something yummy

Help your kids get comfortable in the kitchen at an early age by allowing them to help with age-appropriate tasks when making something that they love to eat:[2]

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    Baking is a great group activity where the kids can help with measuring and mixing. Tacos, pizzas and stir fries can also be very kid-friendly.

    Look for recipes that you and your kids will enjoy: Master Chef-To-Be: 40 Easy Recipes To Cook With Kids

    4. Listen to a podcast

    Podcasts are becoming a very popular platform for storytelling, comedy, news and so much more. Chances are, you already have a list of podcasts that you love to listen do.

    Did you know that there are podcasts made for kids too? On Fatherly, they have some interesting podcasts for kids here.

    Round up your family and spend time listening together. Have a laugh, hear a great story or learn something new.

    5. Race paper airplanes

    Folding and racing paper airplanes is a game that never goes out of style. See how far each child can make their paper airplane go, using their own innovative folding technique. Then, try out different designs and see which one is the most aerodynamic. The results may be surprising!

    Here’re some airplanes ideas from John Collins, the Paper Airplane Guy:

    6. Make handmade cards

    Is there a holiday or birthday coming up? Use this time to make unique, thoughtful cards for grandparents or aunts and uncles.

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    Bring out the glitter, paint, stickers and other art materials to let your kids’ imaginations go wild! This will make a wonderful surprise for your relatives to receive in the mail.

    7. Science experiments

    What better way to teach kids about how the world works while entertaining them at the same time? Choose an age-appropriate activity for older kids and help them set it up using common household materials. From invisible ink to a marshmallow catapult, there are endless possibilities for a day of science fun!

    8. Learn how to fold origamI

    Origami is the art of folding paper into a shape that represents an object. It’s amazing how a few simple folds can transform a piece of paper into something completely different!

    Using origami or printer paper, show your kids how to fold a few different simple origami patterns. Once your kids have mastered those, move on to more challenging designs.

    9. Make indoor s’mores

    S’mores doesn’t have to be an outdoor-only treat! Capture the magic of sitting around a campfire by bringing the best part indoors.

    Use your fireplace or stove to roast marshmallows or pop the assembled s’mores into the oven for a ready-to-eat dessert. Tell ghost stories or sing campfire songs to make it a truly authentic experience.

    10. Talent show

    Everyone has a talent they can show off. Whether it’s playing a musical instrument, doing an imitation or hula hooping, no talent is too trivial to share in the family talent show.

    Use props, costumes and other members of the family to perform your act. Give out prizes in various categories to all of the participants. Record a video of the show and have a family viewing later.

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    11. Sing-a-long

    Do your family members like to sing in the shower, in the car and pretty much all the time? Put on a song that everyone knows or take turns belting out your favorite tunes. Don’t worry if you or your kids can’t carry a tune. The only requirement is being enthusiastic and having fun.

    12. Board game

    A great way for you and your kids to bond while having fun is to play a board game together. Your kids may not want to pull out Candy Land for the hundredth time, but how about trying some new board games? From families that love Disney, drawing, singing or building, there is sure to be a board game that will get everyone excited.

    Here’re some interesting board games you can try with your kids.

    13. Fashion show

    Dressing up is so much better when kids are allowed to use Mom and Dad’s clothes.

    Use this opportunity to gather up clothes, shoes and accessories that need to be de-cluttered and let your kids have free reign. Create a runway for the models to walk down and showcase their fashionable and on trend outfits.

    14. Indoor obstacle course

    Are your kids full of energy? Design an indoor obstacle course using items such as chairs, hula hoops, and pillows.[3]

      Use a timer to see who can complete it the fastest with no cheating! See if your kids can improve upon their time or figure out more efficient ways of completing the course.

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      15. Create a TV show

      Urge your kids write and produce their very own TV show. It could be a comedy, a mystery, a talk show or a game show. After they come up with a script or plot, record the show for them and do some basic video editing or add special effects. Have a screening with the whole family!

      16. Make ice cream

      Making ice cream at home is a great way to combine a science lesson with a delicious treat! You only need a few ingredients and basic materials to make your very own ice cream: How to Make Ice Cream At Home Without An Ice Cream Making Machine

      Let your kids take charge in doing all of the shaking and check to see if it’s ready after a couple of minutes. Ice cream DOES taste better when you make it yourself.

      17. Plan a garage sale

      You can teach your kids many valuable lessons by helping them sort their own clothes and toys for an upcoming garage sale.

      Help them decide which items they have outgrown and how much they should charge for each. You can also talk to them about what they are going to buy with their profits or encourage them to donate it to a good cause.

      18. Treasure hunt

      Create a list of things for your kids to find around the house. Use riddles if your kids are old enough to add an additional challenging element to the hunt. Design the hunt so that each clue leads to the next one. Have your kids work together to read and figure out each clue. Don’t forget the prize at the end!

        A dreary, rainy day does not have to result in a group of unhappy and bored kids, cooped up inside. There are countless things that can keep them entertained and engaged that doesn’t involve staring at a screen for hours at a time. Use these ideas to show your kids that creativity and enthusiasm can go a long way.

        Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

        Reference

        [1] Red Tricycle: 14 Handmade Instruments That Actually Play Music
        [2] Thirty Hand Made Days: Kids Cooking Camp at Home
        [3] Family Education: indoor obstacle course

        More by this author

        Katie Lemons

        Parenting Blogger and Full-Time Working Mom

        14 Helpful Tips for Single Parents: How to Stay Sane While Doing it All How to Homeschool in the 21st Century (For All Types of Parents & Kids) Reading for Kids: 17 Reasons Why It’s Important and Where to Start 11 Smart Pieces of Advice to Help You Thrive as a Single Mother 15 Insightful Parenting Books That Help Your Kids Start off a Healthy Life

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        Published on April 18, 2019

        An Expert Parenting Guide to Dealing with Toddler Tantrums

        An Expert Parenting Guide to Dealing with Toddler Tantrums

        My daughter who is now seven, was two-and-a-half years old when we visited an indoor playground. I vividly recall her complete meltdown and tantrum when I said it was time to go home. She threw herself with full gusto onto the padded floor of the play area and began to wail with tears streaming down her face.

        At the time, I had twins who were about six months old. I had already loaded them into their car seats and snapped the car seats into the stroller. I was ready to head home and get everyone down for a nap, so I could nap as well. At that moment when my daughter began to wail, I felt like I wanted to cry too. Short on sleep, hungry, and with my hands full with three children ages two and under, I was feeling overwhelmed.

        When my toddler’s meltdowns had happened at home, I didn’t feel overwhelmed or flustered. However, when this particular meltdown happened in public, which became the first of many, I wanted to cry, or make her somehow stop her tantrum, or just hide from the dozen or so people watching this situation unfold as their sweet children played happily on the indoor climbing structure.

        I tried to reason with my daughter. That didn’t help at all. If anything, that made her wail even louder causing some eyebrows to go up around me. I could almost hear them thinking “can’t she control her child.” My response would have been “well obviously I can’t!” Nobody said a word to me though.

        When the reasoning didn’t work, it led to me pleading with her to get off the ground and walk to the car with me, so we could have a nice lunch at home. I then tried to bribe her. I said if she went to the car, I would give her candy. I had remembered that there was a sucker in the side door of my car from the pediatrician’s office that I hadn’t let her have the day before. I probably would have given her $100 in that moment. I just wanted the tantrum to stop.

        She continued with her wailing, thrashing on the ground, and crying for several more minutes. Nothing I was saying or doing was working. In the end, I picked her up and put her under my arm and carried her surf board style out of the building while pushing the double stroller with my other hand. Another parent held the door open for me. By this point, I could see other parents were feeling sorry for me in this situation.

        After this public meltdown and a few more later that week, I started to read up on toddler tantrums and how to handle them. I found techniques that worked! It may not necessarily ease my embarrassment when they happened in public, but I learned how to handle the tantrums in the best way possible to simply get through the toddler tantrum stage.

        We may not be able to eliminate all toddler tantrums, but we can learn ways to minimize them. Below are helpful tips for all parents of toddlers.

        Ignore the Tantrum and Don’t Give in!

        Your toddler is throwing tantrums because they are looking to get your attention or get something they want. More often than not, they are doing it because they want something.

        In my daughter’s case, she wanted to stay at the playground longer. If I had given in and let her play longer, I would have been teaching her that if she has a temper tantrum, then she gets to stay longer.

        Never give in to the child. You are reinforcing their tantrum throwing behaviors when you give them what they want. For example, if you are out shopping and your toddler throws a fit because they want a candy bar at the checkout, then giving them the candy bar to make them quiet only teaches them to have a tantrum the next time you are in a store — your child now knows that they can get the candy bar if they have a tantrum.

        Don’t give in to their tantrum by giving them what they want, even if it is something small and inconsequential to you. If you have said no, stand your ground. Caving in and giving your child what they want when they have a temper tantrum reinforces the bad behavior. You will end up with a child who throws even more tantrums because you have taught them through cause and effect that tantrum throwing gets them what they want.

        Do Nothing

        Your child needs to learn that temper tantrums get them nothing. Some children do it because they are seeking attention. Give your child attention, but not while the tantrum is happening.

        If you recognize that they are throwing temper tantrums because they want more attention from you, then make an effort to give them attention at a later time, when they aren’t throwing a tantrum.

        When the child is in the midst of a tantrum do nothing, say nothing, and ignore their tantrum.

        I learned very quickly that in the case of my daughter’s public tantrums, I could get them to stop by continuing to pack up our items and move toward the door with the intention to leave. I didn’t respond to her tantrum. Continuing my actions let her know that I was serious and I was leaving the building. It was amazing how she would quickly pick herself off the ground and sprint towards us, fearing that she would be left behind.

        I never left my children anywhere, but if needed, I would go outside and stand on the other side of the glass door, watching her and simply waiting until she finished her fit and was ready to get up and come home with us.

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        When she learned that her tantrum did not get her what she wanted and that she got even less attention from me while she was doing it, her behavior changed.

        Avoid Trying to Calm The Child

        Instinctively, we want to soothe our child and go to them to try to calm them down during a tantrum. This is not effective with temper tantrums, especially if they are doing it for attention.

        Although it may seem counterintuitive, make all efforts to avoid calming the child down. If they are doing it for attention, then you are rewarding the temper tantrum by giving them attention. It communicates to the child that a tantrum will get your attention.

        Solve the attention problem after the tantrum by spending quality time engaged with your child. However, don’t give them attention, even by trying to simply calm them, during the tantrum or you are reinforcing the bad behavior.

        Warn Them in Advance

        I also learned to be proactive in situations where tantrums had happened previously. I began giving my daughter a five minute warning at the playground. She was told on each visit to the playground when she had five minutes left to play and that we would leave immediately if she complained or throw a temper tantrum.

        This was a warning that I gave very clearly every time we went to a playground. I always said this in a firm, yet kind tone “You get five more minutes to play and then we have to leave, if you complain or throw a tantrum then we have to leave immediately.” This worked amazingly well!

        Letting them know what is expected is what kids want.

        Keep Them Safe

        If the child is a danger to themselves or others, for example, because they are throwing toys across the room during their tantrum, then physically remove the child and take them to a safe and quiet spot for them to calm down.

        Some children need to be held so that they don’t harm themselves. Holding them gently, yet firmly, because they are hitting themselves, pulling their own hair, or slamming their body into walls, is important to do immediately when you see any self- harm take place.

        Hold them and tell them you will release them when they have calmed down. Say it gently and with empathy while holding them just firmly enough so that they cannot harm themselves or others.

        There is no need to be aggressive or squeeze the child in this process. Take action calmly, but with the intention to cease their harmful activity immediately.

        After the Tantrum

        Acknowledge that the child has complied by ending their tantrum. Giving a praise such as “I am glad you calmed down” will help to reinforce the ceasing of the bad behavior.

        Not rewarding their tantrum is crucial in this process. If you give in and give them what they want and then they stop the tantrum, you are thereby praising them when they don’t deserve the praise because you gave into what they wanted. In doing this, you are defeating yourself.

        Don’t give them what they are throwing the tantum about. For example, if it is because they want a certain toy and another child has that toy, then do not give them the toy because of the tantrum.

        Praise them for stopping the tantrum once they calm themselves down. If they finish with their tantrum and you haven’t given in to what they were asking for, then praise them for calming themselves.

        For example, if they have completely calmed down and the other child is now done with that toy, then you can give it to the child when they are completely calmed. Have them practice asking for the toy nicely. Let them know they get to play with the toy because they asked nicely, they aren’t throwing a tantrum, and because they have completely calmed down.

        Get Professional Help if Needed

        If you feel like your child’s tantrums are excessive or you are having difficulty handling the tantrums, then talk to your child’s pediatrician. They may be able to guide you.

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        There are also medical reasons that can cause a child to throw tantrums more often. For example, they may have speech problems and they are frustrated that they cannot communicate with words what they want to express. This frustration can turn into tantrums.

        Chronic pain or an underlying medical condition can be causing the child distress and discomfort which can lead to tantrums as well.

        If you feel that the temper tantrums are beyond your ability to handle as a parent, or you feel that there may be some other reason for the continued tantrums, then speak with your child’s pediatrician.

        Tips to Avoid Tantrums

        There are some practical parenting methods that parents and caregivers can utilize that will help to diminish the occurrence of toddler temper tantrums. These tips may not entirely eliminate tantrums, but they can help to minimize them for occurring.

        Giving Choices: The Love and Logic Model

        Love and Logic parenting methods[1] are golden. In this method of parenting, it is taught that parents should give their child choices every day, all throughout the day.

        Allowing the child to make choices gives the child a sense of control. For example, allowing a decision for which book to read at bed time whereby the parent offers two choices that they don’t mind reading. Another example is offering them two options of outfits to wear in the morning.

        The parent chooses two options that are both acceptable and allows the child to make the final decision on which outfit they want to wear. This decision making helps the child feel that they have some control over their life.

        When children are told where to go, what to do, and how to do it, with little or no flexibility they will act out. That acting out often comes in the form of tantrums with toddlers. They are at a phase where learning to be independent is part of their development. If their independence is completely crushed because they aren’t allowed to make any decisions, then they will act out.

        Create Decision Making Opportunities

        As parents and caregivers, we can create opportunities for decision making all throughout the day. By presenting options, all being acceptable to the parent, the child feels empowered and has a sense of independence that is natural in their developmental phase.

        If you are experiencing tantrums daily and you have a controlled home environment, yet you can’t quite pinpoint the problem, try giving more choices to your child. They can’t tell you that they want choices and are working on developing their independence.

        Developmentally children are seeking to become more independent little humans during the toddler phase, and offering them choices helps facilitate that need for independence.

        Trying out choices will help them feel like they have some control of their life and activities. However, if the choices lead to tantrums because they don’t like the options presented, then you let them know that those are the options and if they don’t chose, you will have to choose for them.

        Follow through and make the choice for them, if they continue throwing a temper tantrum. Don’t reward their bad behavior by allowing a choice. Take away the choice in that circumstance and moment in time because of the tantrum.

        When it comes time to offer a decision later in the day, perhaps for example, offering them juice or water with their lunch, remind them that if they throw a tantrum, then you will make the decision for them.

        Be Calm and Consistent

        Be consistent in your parenting. When you give in to a tantrum one day by, for example, giving them the candy bar at the checkout to make them stop crying and the next time you yell at them, you are confusing your child.

        By remaining calm, telling them what is expected, and following through each time they are on the verge of a tantrum or they are throwing a tantrum, you help eliminate the tantrums.

        Consistently ignore the tantrum until they have stopped. Do not give in. Remain calm and do not yell or raise your voice. It makes things worse when you get heated in the midst of their tantrum. Count to ten or one-hundred if necessary.

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        If you must remove the child from the situation, do so calmly and without berating them. Don’t give attention to the temper tantrum, other than praising them when they calm down on their own.

        Ignore the actual temper tantrum while it is happening. This doesn’t mean leave them alone. You don’t want them to harm themselves or others, so stay close, but act unfazed by their tantrum.

        Distractions

        Your child may have some triggers. You may already be fully aware of what they are. It could be leaving the playground, going past the toy section while out shopping, or taking away items that are not safe for your child to be playing with.

        Whatever the trigger may be, you can distract your child creatively and thereby avoid a temper tantrum. You have to remember that this temper tantrum phase is just that…a phase. You have to ride out the phase, but that doesn’t mean you can’t try to avoid the tantrums using some creativity.

        If you know that the back of the store where the toys are located will lead to a tantrum, then avoid that section of the store. If you know that your child likes to play with your phone and you don’t want them to play with your phone, but taking away the phone leads to a tantrum, then get creative.

        Be prepared with a different object or toy to distract your child. Have this toy in your purse or in the car, so that you keep the child content, avoid the tantum, and without sacrificing your phone. Maybe you have an old flip phone in a junk drawer. The next time you are out doing errands and your toddler tries to reach into your purse for your phone, which is in the cart next to them, simply remove the purse and hand them the old flip phone.

        If they throw the phone because it’s not the one they wanted, then put it away and say “I’m sorry you didn’t want it, now you won’t have anything to play with.” Teach them that their bad behavior won’t get them what they want. Try the flip phone another time (at a later time and different circumstance) and remind them that they don’t get your phone but they can have this phone, which is now theirs.

        Act excited about the phone you are giving them, while also letting them know that if they throw it, you will put it away in your purse like you did the last time.

        Be creative about distractions. They may not all work, but at least you tried something different. When you do find something that works, for example, you sing a little song to distract your toddler when you have to take away something they shouldn’t be playing with, like an extension cord or the dog food, then keep doing it.

        When you find a distraction that works, keep using it until it no longer works and then try something new.

        Ensure They Have Plenty of Sleep and Food

        Children tend to act out when they are hungry or tired. If your toddler is not getting enough sleep at night, they will be prone to temper tantrums. If your child is having a tantrum and you realize that they are badly in need of a nap, then when they have calmed down, get them home and in their bed for a nap.

        Toddlers are highly reactive when they haven’t had enough sleep or they are hungry. Toddlers are not equipped with the skills to express how they feel. When they are tired or hungry, it makes them upset, but most of the time they aren’t able to express that they are tired or hungry, instead anything can set them off into a temper tantrum.

        Keeping toddlers on a good sleep schedule and keeping them feed every couple of hours, meaning meals with healthy snacks between meals, will help to minimize tantrums that occur because they tired or hungry.

        Give Attention through Quality Time

        Some temper tantrums occur because the child wants attention. It would be great if your toddler could approach you and say “I need some attention from you, I am feeling distant from you, so I need to you spend some quality time with me today.” Toddlers won’t say much, if anything at all. Instead, they act out.

        Temper tantrums are often the easiest and quickest way to get adult attention. You can help to prevent this from happening by spending time with your toddler.

        Get on the floor and play with their toys alongside of them. Read them books at bedtime. Give them hugs many times a day and let them know that they are good boy or good girl and that you love them very much.

        These small actions throughout the day help your child know that you notice them. It is those moments of pointed, quality time and attention that keep their need for attention satisfied.

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        Praise Positive Behaviors

        If you fail to praise the positive behaviors, you may end up with a child who acts out and has tantrums so that they can get a reaction and attention from you.

        Negative attention is better than no attention in the mind of toddler. Give them positive feedback and praise when they do something good.

        Perhaps it was sharing a toy with a friend at the playground, they put a puzzle together on their own, or they adequately washed their hands before meal time. Whatever the small act was, if it was something you can praise them for, then say it. It will help them feel loved and that your attention is on them for that moment.

        When you do this all day long, you are giving them positive feedback and reinforcing good behavior. It is a win-win situation.

        Help the Child Better Communicate

        A toddler’s vocabulary is limited. They have a hard time telling you what they want, even when they know exactly what they want. Perhaps they want juice, but that word isn’t in their vocabulary yet.

        Sometimes asking your child to show you what they want can help bridge the lack of vocabulary. Tell the child that if they can’t tell you, they can try to show you what it is that they want. Let them know that you care and want to know what they are trying to express.

        Tantrums often come from toddlers because they can’t express themselves or they feel that their parents aren’t trying to understand them. Again, it goes back to feeling ignored or lack of attention.

        If you can see your child is wanting something, but you don’t know what it is exactly, don’t just brush them off and move on because you could likely be setting up the situation for a toddler tantrum. They get frustrated and temper tantrums is how they let it out.

        If they do start the tantrum, let them have their tantrum, ignore it; once it is done, seek to help them communicate and assist you in understanding what it is that they want.

        Final Thoughts

        Temper tantrums are not a pleasant experience for parents, but are nonetheless a normal part of toddler development.

        Most toddlers will have tantrums between the ages of one and three. Some extend beyond that age as well. The frequency of tantrums varies from one child to the next.

        There are ways for parents to handle the temper tantrums that help to eliminate the behavior rather than reinforce the bad behavior. Ignoring the child during their temper tantrum is one of the best techniques to discourage temper tantrums.

        There are also parenting behavior that can help reduce or minimize the occurrence of toddler tantrums. Some of these parenting behaviors include spending quality time with their child, praising good behavior that the child exhibits, and ensuring that the child gets plenty of food and sleep.

        There is no magic cure for temper tantrums. They are part of the developmental process and a phase of life that toddlers go through.

        The key for parents is to create an atmosphere where tantrums are minimized and positive behaviors are reinforced.

        Featured photo credit: Mike Fox via unsplash.com

        Reference

        [1] Love and Logic Parenting Methods

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