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How to Make Muscle Building Workout Work for You (+Workout Routine)

How to Make Muscle Building Workout Work for You (+Workout Routine)

It may not be common knowledge, but 80% of muscle building is done outside of the gym/workout-space. This article explores all aspects of building muscle that you may not have heard about from your local trainer, or fellow gym-goer and will get you the muscle building workout that works for you.

Your biggest block to building muscle

Before we start discussing muscle building workout routines, I’d like to explain that one of the biggest deterrents from building muscle is stress in the body. No matter what routine you apply, if your life is filled with stress, you’ll find building muscle to be quite challenging.

Stress can completely diminish your efforts of building muscle by way of causing adrenal fatigue, which is a taxing of the adrenal glands, forcing them to overproduce or under-produce cortisol, the stress hormone, at the wrong times.

Stress will also impair your ability to get a good night’s sleep, which in essence is when you are in fact building the most muscle – during the 5th stage of the sleep cycle – REM (Rapid Eye Movement) Deep Sleep.

This video discusses about how sleep has effect on your muscle building process:

Effective methods to reduce stress include being in nature, meditation, regular exercise, and the dietary removal of simple sugars and carbs.

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High sugar/carb diets will increase inflammation, cause joint discomfort, and generally make you feel lethargic which will inevitably lead to increased stress levels due to your inability to optimally manage life circumstances as they arise. Essentially when you are consuming large amounts of sugar, your capacity to think clearly and perform problem solving is severely diminished.

How diet affects muscle building

Since we’re on the topic of diet, I’d like to make it very clear that if you are not consuming antiquate macro nutrients (Protein, Carbs, Fats) and Micro Nutrients (essential vitamins and minerals), any effort you make towards building muscle will be in vein.

A quality high protein diet

To effectively build muscle, you absolutely must support any muscle building routines with a quality high protein diet. Now you may be thinking, “hey, I make protein shakes all the time!”.. let me explain that synthetic protein holds no comparison to that of high quality food based protein.

The branched chain amino acid complex from a steak or chicken breast far surpasses that of any protein powder. The only time you should consider protein supplements is if they are to support an already established well rounded diet. Those powders should be compounded from hemp, pea protein, or even grasshopper protein – all of which I suggest above any whey/isolate proteins.

Minerals and supplements

Along with structured dieting, you must consume lots of water to actually reap the benefits of your training efforts, and I also suggest supplements such as Creatine Monohydrate and unflavored BCAA (Branched-Chain Amino Acid) which are the essential amino acids valine, isoleucine, and leucine.

Utilizing BCAA powder will help stimulate muscle Protein synthesis – the metabolic process that takes place when your body creates new muscle protein. BCAA’s will also help reduce the rate of protein breakdown by reducing activity in the protein breakdown pathway, and decreasing the expression of complexes involved in protein breakdown (reducing the amount of mRNA).

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Now that we’ve discussed stress, quality of sleep, and diet.. let’s get into the actual muscle building routines that’ll get you some muscle gains!

Keep in mind any workout routine requires absolute dedication and consistency to see results – if you are not consistent, don’t expect miracles!

What is a good muscle building workout training?

Generally speaking any muscle building workout program should consider both high repetition training for hypertrophy and low repetition for strength training.

Hypertrophy is n increase in size of skeletal muscle through a growth in size of its component cells. Two factors contribute to hypertrophy:

  • Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, which focuses more on increased muscle glycogen storage;
  • Myofibrillar hypertrophy, which focuses more on increased myofibril size.

For strength training, it generally means the strengthening of the C.N.S. (Central Nervous System), that occurs while working out in a lower rep range with higher amount of weight – increased physical exertion by way of maximal force production.

Our goal is to build larger muscles but to support them with a foundation of strength. You can achieve this by implementing a simple workout routine, which I’ll describe below, or a more complex training program.

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How to start as a beginner

Developing muscle heavily revolves around ‘pumping’ blood and oxygen into the muscles. In fact that’s where the popular term ‘getting a pump’ is derived from.

Red blood cells carry hemoglobin which oxygen bonds with as the hemoglobin rich blood cells move through the lungs blood vessels. The now oxygen rich blood cells carry that oxygen to the cells that are demanding it, in this case skeletal muscle cells.

If you are a beginner to building muscle and working out, then it’s actually very effective to apply a ‘Whole-Body Split’ routine, whereby you are literally working out all muscle groups each day for at least 3-5 days per week. This approach is effective for newbies because you have not developed any muscular hypertrophy and your body will respond quite well to full body routines before you hit a plateau/ceiling.

As a beginner, your body will adapt well to the high frequency training. When I first started lifting weights, I performed full body routines for the first 3 months before hitting this plateau which requires changing to a more intermediate, and later advanced routine. The routine I’ve found most effective includes a blend of cardio vascular training, high repetition weight training, and low repetition strength training.

In this video, I discussed how much cardio to do for weight loss to give you an idea of how to apply cardio within your routine:

An effective muscle building workout routine should include at least 3 days of training per week, and ideally 4 or more days.

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The simple muscle building workout routine

Below outlines the basic structure of a 3-day per week bodybuilding/muscle building workout regimen. This is merely to give an example of a training ‘split’ which I recommend for optimal muscle development and allowed recovery time.

Feel free to adjust the day in which your workout lands; as long as you are hitting a 4 day minimum and giving antiquate time for rest, you’ll see results!

Monday (Push/Pull – Chest & Back)

  • 15min Warmup Cardio (increasing the pace every 5min)
  • 30-45min Weight Training/Resistance Training (super-sets being ideal to maintain elevated heart rate and ‘pump’)
  • Exercises such as push-ups, weighted or normal pull-ups, bench press, dumbbell press, bent over rows, cable machine chest fly, lat pull-downs, and more
  • 10min Cool-Down Cardio (steady-stay, walking pace or slow jog)

Tuesday

  • Optional REST

Wednesday (Lower Body – Quads, Hamstrings, Calves)

  • 15min Warmup Cardio (increasing the pace every 5min)
  • 30-45min Weight Training/Resistance Training (no supersets, but keep minimal rest between each set 3-5min)
  • Exercises such as squats, deadlifts, leg press, calf raises, sled pushing, plyometrics such as box jumps, and much more
  • 10min Cool-Down Cardio (steady-stay, walking pace or slow jog)

Thursday

  • Optional REST

Friday (Arms – Shoulders, Biceps, Triceps)

  • 15min Warmup Cardio (increasing the pace every 5min)
  • 20-30min Weight Training/Resistance Training (super-sets being ideal to maintain elevated heart rate and ‘pump’)
  • Exercises such as shoulder raises, bicep curls, tricep extensions, overhead pressing including Arnold shoulder-press
  • 10min Cool-Down Cardio (steady-stay, walking pace or slow jog)

Saturday

  • Optional REST, recommend active recovery cardio activities (walking, biking, hiking, jogging)

Sunday

  • Optional REST, recommend active recovery cardio activities (walking, biking, hiking, jogging)

Bonus: Complex muscle building workouts

Now that we’ve covered the basics of full-body splits and 3 day a week splits, I’m going to touch on popular muscle building workout programs that are commonly used by intermediate to expert bodybuilders, powerlifters, and powerbuilders (a combination of the two).

You can download these programs as templates (in microsoft excel format) and enter your information. Below outlines the suggested programs which will help build muscle and strength.

  • Jim Wendler 5-3-1 Template
    The core philosophy behind 5/3/1 revolves around basic tenets of strength training that have stood the test of time.
  • Texas Method Template
    The Texas Method (TM) is a strength training program renowned for its ability to provide intermediate to advanced lifters (those with 18-24+ months of continuous training according to legendary strength training coach Mark Rippetoe) with increased variety and physical adaptation.[1]

Conclusion

Building muscle requires dedication, commitment and there are simply no shortcuts.

In this article, I’ve outlined several approaches to building muscle for beginners, as well as those that are more advanced. Please keep in mind the pillars of building muscle which I had mentioned above – stress reduction, quality sleep, and adjustments to diet including increased hydration.

If you apply these simple steps, you’ll be well on your way to building loads of muscle – good luck!

Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

Reference

[1] Starting Strength: Mark Rippetoe

More by this author

Adam Evans

BioHacker, competitive athlete, researcher in many fields including health and fitness, science, philosophy, metaphysics, religion.

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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