Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on May 18, 2018

18 Work at Home Jobs for Moms (Well-Paid, Flexible and Fun)

18 Work at Home Jobs for Moms (Well-Paid, Flexible and Fun)

Wouldn’t it be great if you could have it all – be with your kids as much as you want but still have a fulfilling job that you enjoy? It sounds a little too good to be true.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, approximately 21% of employees work from home on an average day. I’m sure a significant proportion of these people are mothers who are taking care of their children simultaneously. It can be hard to juggle so many responsibilities, but the key to making it work is finding a job with the perfect fit – one that has built-in flexibility, reasonable compensation and engages all of your greatest strengths.

There are many offers of jobs that promise easy money for little to no work. Those actually are too good to be true. The following work at home jobs for moms are legitimate but do require time and effort. Find the category that best suits your abilities and interests.

For moms who are a people person

1. Social media consultant

All of those hours spent on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can finally be put to good use. Social media has become a vital component of advertising and PR for companies in many different industries. If you are a savvy social media user, you can use your skills to manage social media accounts for a business and get paid for it.

Get the job here: Mashable, Appen, $99 Social

2. Home daycare

Do you wish you could get paid for staying home and taking care of your kids? Opening your own at home daycare is the next best thing! With the outrageous cost of childcare, there are many working parents seeking a trustworthy and budget-friendly alternative.

Look up what your state’s laws are regarding an at-home daycare at Daycare.com and figure out if it would be a good route for you to take. Let your mom friends know about your business and post to local sites to find potential customers.

Get the job here: Care.com, Sitter.com, Childcare Center

3. Virtual assistant

If you are looking for an office job that doesn’t require you to go into an office, becoming a virtual assistant could be a great fit. Tasks will vary depending on the company but can include things like scheduling appointments, data entry, organizing records, email management, social media management and editing. Contacting bloggers, online companies and websites directly can be a great way of finding job opportunities, in addition to advertising in and responding to job boards.

Advertising

Get the job here: Fancy Hands, Red Butler, Persist, Assistant Match

For moms who love helping people

4. Dog walking/sitting

Do you love being around dogs but can’t commit to having one of your own? There is a big demand for dog walking for people who work long hours away from the home as well as dog sitting for when dog owners go out of town. This would give you and your kids the perfect opportunity to have fun with a four-legged friend without having to adopt one of your own.

Get the job here: Rover, Fetch!, Petsitters

5. Rent out baby gear

If there’s one thing that moms have a lot of, it’s baby gear. When families with young children go on vacation, they don’t have the ability to bring all of their gear along. Items like cribs, strollers, car seats, high chairs and swings are not very portable but can make or break a vacation experience.

Set up an account, list all of the gear you have available for rent, and decide on the prices and delivery area to get started.

Get the job here: Babierge , Baby’s Away, goBaby

6. Errands/Odd Jobs

If you’re a mom that likes to be out and about and don’t mind picking up a few extra errands, this option can become a considerable source of income for you. Sites like TaskRabbit connect you with local users who are looking for a variety of tasks they need help with. These tasks can vary from furniture assembly to grocery shopping. Pick the tasks that fit your abilities and your schedule.

Get the job here: TaskRabbit, Zaarly, Gigwalk

7. Online stylist

Do you have a flair for fashion? Do your friends always compliment you on your amazing sense of style? If so, becoming an online stylist could be your calling. Many upscale fashion subscription boxes are offering the services of a personal stylist to help them create individualized and professionally curated boxes. Use your skills for profit and help others improve their wardrobe at the same time.

Advertising

Get the job here: Stitchfix, Bombfell, Rocksbox

For moms who are natural-born teachers

8. Tutor

Moms are fairly gifted in helping their own children learn new concepts and ideas, and this skill is easily transferrable to being an online tutor. The higher level of education you have in a certain subject, the more money you can make. Ages of students that need tutors range from elementary all the way to college. You can use websites to connect you with students, post an ad, or let people know about the services you are offering by word of mouth.

Get the job here: Tutor.com, Chegg Tutors, TutorMe

9. Teaching English as a second language

Since you are reading this article, that means you have a skill that many people around the world are seeking – knowing the English language. Learning to read, write, and speak English has become an invaluable asset in industries based in the U.S. or that are global. Specialty websites and local resources can connect you with people looking for an English teacher to learn from and converse with.

Resources: italki, Lingoda, VIPKID

For moms who are excellent writers

10. Freelance writer

For those moms who are talented writers, there are many opportunities to get paid for contributing quality content. Blogs, websites and magazines are always looking for experts in their particular niche who have a way with words. The topics you can write about are endless, and you will be able to utilize your creativity and writing ability to generate substantial earnings whenever you have time to write.

Get the job here: Wizzley, Contena, Freelance Writing Jobs

11. Blogger

As blogs continue to gain popularity as a go-to resource for recipes, fashion, parenting, current events and more, the number of blogs out there are higher than ever. Blogging is the perfect job for moms because of the flexibility, lack of deadlines and freedom of content. Many moms use their mothering knowledge and experiences as a basis for their blog content.

Advertising

It is possible to make a steady income from blogging but it takes time, dedication, and promotion to successfully monetize a blog. It can be a great platform for creativity and unfiltered expression through writing.

Get the job here: WordPress, Blogger, Medium

12. Translator

If you are proficient in a second language, becoming a document translator is an option you should definitely consider. Not only would this job pay more because of your unique qualifications, it will also help you to maintain and improve your language skills. There are job opportunities in a wide variety of industries that require document translation into other languages, and this is a job that can be easily done at home.

Get the job here: Gengo, Unbabel, ProZ

For the creative moms

13. Graphic designer

Every website on the Internet needs a graphic designer in order to look professional and unique. Whether you have graphic design experience or you’re just starting out, there are opportunities available for you to demonstrate and hone your design skills. Create your own website and use it as a platform to showcase your work. You can also look for work on freelance websites to get additional work experience on your resume.

Get the job here: Coroflot, Behance, Krop

14. Photographer

Even though most people have access to a high quality camera through their smart phones, photographers are still very much in demand. Professional photographers are required for special occasions (weddings, portraits, maternity) and are compensated well for their services. Taking stock photos offers another opportunity for a photographer to earn money. Stock photos are in constant need by websites, blogs and online publications.

Get the job here: Alamy, Shutterstock, Getty Images

15. Homemade crafts

I’m sure you’ve heard of or even purchased items from Etsy, the most well-known website for buying and selling homemade items. If you are crafty and can create products that people would be interested in buying, this can be a very lucrative work from home opportunity. The categories of items that are the most popular include: home decor, jewelry, clothing, toys, craft supplies, and kids/babies.

Advertising

Get the job here: Etsy , Artfire, Handmade at Amazon, Cargoh

For moms with a degree

16. IT support

If you have a degree and training in technical support, repair, installation, networking, software debugging, and other IT-related disciplines, you are in a great position to work remotely and get compensated well. Many companies rely on remote technician support via the telephone or online, and this is one of the highest paying work from home jobs out there.

Get the job here: Apple, Computer Assistant, Dell

17. Consultant

Companies are constantly seeking consultants with a knowledge base in a variety of different areas including medicine, social work, administration, finance, marketing, IT, human resources and more. You can use your college degree and prior work experience to find a consulting job that you can work at from home. Both short-term and long-term assignments are typically available, which offer a great deal of flexibility.

Get the job here: Guru, FlexJobs, Upwork

18. Actuary

Have you ever heard of an actuary? In the past, it was used to describe a person who analyzes statistics in order to calculate risks and premiums for insurance companies. However, the job title has expanded to include many more industries that can benefit from data mining and economic forecasting. If you have a degree in mathematics, finance or statistics, look into getting your license through Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) or Society of Actuaries (SOA).

Get the job here: Be an Actuary, SOA Job Center

Find the opportunity that fits you

As you can see, there are a multitude of options for moms who want to have a career they can be proud of while still spending time at home with their kids.

Whether you prefer a job you can do at your desk, with your hands or out and about, there is an opportunity that is perfect for you. All you have to do is get out there and find it!

Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

More by this author

Katie Lemons

Blogger and Full-Time Working Mom

18 Fun Activities for Kids to Do on a Rainy Day 25 Tasty and Healthy Kids’ Lunch Ideas for Home or School 18 Work at Home Jobs for Moms (Well-Paid, Flexible and Fun) 13 Ways Working Moms Can Balance Work and Family (And Be Happy)

Trending in Smartcut

1How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done 221 Cover Letter Tips to Hook The Attention of Employers 3How to Quit Your Job That You Hate and Start Doing What You Love 419 Ways to Use Creative Thinking in the Workplace to Up Your Credibility 5Is There a Secret to Success? 22 Ways Productive People Reach the Top

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on July 12, 2018

17 Ted Talks for Kids to Inspire Little Minds to Do Big Things

17 Ted Talks for Kids to Inspire Little Minds to Do Big Things

A few years ago, I watched Brene Brown’s TED Talk on Vulnerability. Her story, her research, her authenticity, and yes, her vulnerability resonated with me deeply. One of the concepts that stood out the most was that in order to live wholeheartedly, we must feel the full range of emotions. The positive: joy, gratitude, happiness. And the not so positive: grief, fear, shame, sadness, disappointment.

This talk moved me, changed me and challenged me to think differently. And that is what TED talks have the power to do. They can make the hairs on the back of our neck stand up, bring us to tears, and most importantly, motivate, inspire and challenge our thinking.

Which is why I’m so excited to share these TED Talks for kids. I’ve always had a passion for working with children; I have three daughters of my own, co-lead two local Girl Scout Troops, spent time in my career working in education and am a member of the Galileo community advisory board (an innovation camp for kids).

I’m involved in all of these because I feel deeply how important it is to help our kids build their confidence, self-esteem, innovation and creativity. I want every kid to realize they are awesome just as they are. That they have the ability to make anything happen if they dream big and work hard. Imagine what that would do for our youth.

If you Google or scour lists of top TED talks, you tend to get similar ones popping up. That’s because they’re awesome. But they’re not all appropriate for kids.

How I shortlisted these TED Talks

I’ve done the hard work for you. Along with my family, kids, their friends and a few others, we vetted over 100 TED Talks and picked out the 17 that I believe send powerful and inspiring messages our kids desperately need.

So, whether your kid is 6 or 16, I hope you find something that inspires, moves, motivates and challenges them.

  • They’re short enough for young brains to stay engaged. While there is an 18 minute “rule” for TED talks, many of the most popular talks are 20+ minutes. Recently, as I toured middle schools for my daughters, one of the principals shared that a kid’s attention span is the kids age minus one. So, if you have an 11 year old, then 10 minutes is his/her attention span. You can’t expect him/her to listen to 18 minutes and stay focused the whole time. All of the talks highlighted below are under 15 minutes. Some are as short as three.
  • They all include life lessons I believe are important for today’s youth. For me, this meant searching for talks that would build confidence and self-esteem; help kids be true to themselves. Understand what makes a happy and successful life. How to dream big. To communicate, interact and treat others. Above all, these talks will help kids see that they are awesome and that anything is possible when they dream big and work hard.
  • They’re kid-friendly. You might think this is obvious, but I found many speakers share political views, curse, or share content or concepts that that could be scary or confusing for young minds. If you ask those around me, I’m probably a little overcautious about what I expose my kids too. I’m ok with that. They have plenty of time to see the darker side of the world as they age. I would be comfortable with my seven-year-old watching all of these.
  • They’re interesting. Kids need to be engaged, interested and motivated to even sit through a video. While this isn’t always easy to do, I’ve tried to find videos with likeable speakers, compelling topics and inspiring stories. And don’t worry, they’re not just for kids – these are awesome talks for adults as well.

Top 17 Ted Talks for kids

1. A Life Lesson From A Volunteer Firefighter (4:01)

I started with this one because all of my kids absolutely loved it. It’s an easy entry point for kids – short and sweet with a powerful message. (And what kid doesn’t like a firefighter?!)

Volunteer Firefighter and Activist Mark Bezos shares his story about how small things can make a big difference.

My 11-year-old’s key takeway? “It shows we don’t have to do something big to make a difference”.

Here’s a key piece of his message:

“In both my vocation at Robin Hood and my avocation as a volunteer firefighter, I am witness to acts of generosity and kindness on a monumental scale, but I’m also witness to acts of grace and courage on an individual basis. And you know what I’ve learned? They all matter.”

2. What Adults Can Learn From Kids (8:06)

One of my 11-year-olds was riveted by this one. In fact, at one point, I tried to increase the volume on the iPad while she kept pushing me out of the way so she didn’t miss anything.

Twelve-year-old Adora Svitak is incredible. This talk is inspiring not only because of what she says, but because of how incredible and confident this young girl is as she presents.

Here are some of my favorite excerpts from her talk:

“Kids don’t think about limitations…they just think about good ideas.”
“Learning between grown-ups and kids should be reciprocal.”
“When expectations are low, trust me, we (kids) will sink to them.”

3. Teach Girls Bravery, Not Perfection (8:50)

Recommended by several people when I was asking around, I found myself choking up in the first two minutes as Reshma shares her personal story about bravery in the face of failure.

“This is not a story about failure or resilience…it’s about bravery.”

She talks about our “bravery deficit”.

“When we teach girls to be brave, and we have a supportive network cheering them on, they will build incredible things.”

She shares one of my favorite philosophies: Progress, not perfection.

This is a great one for those who need a little more confidence to raise their hand, try out for that team, or face an upcoming challenge.

Advertising

4. 10 Ways To Have a Better Conversation (11:30)

This is one of my all-time favorites. I’m becoming increasingly concerned about our kids’ ability to have a face-to-face conversation. Just look around at a restaurant and see how many kids have their faces in phones. One recent survey of managers said 46% of recent grads need to hone their communication skills.

As someone who spent many years earning a living helping people communicate better, I think this is necessary for every kid. It’s a lost art. A skill that is becoming extinct with the world of technology.

Radio Host Celeste Headlee provides great tips for how to have a better conversation, and, more importantly, how to listen.

At one point, she shares this thought written in the Atlantic by a high school teacher named Paul Barnewell.

“I came to realize that conversational competence might be the single most overlooked skill we fail to teach. Kids spend hours each day engaging with ideas and each other through screens, but rarely do they have an opportunity to hone their interpersonal communications skills. It might sound like a funny question, but we have to ask ourselves: Is there any 21st Century skill more important than being able to sustain coherent, confident conversation?”

My older daughters both really enjoyed this talk. They learned “how important it is to listen and to think about other people, not just yourself”.

My favorite line of all time: “There’s no reason to show you’re paying attention, if in fact, you are actually paying attention.”

This is a great one to share with your teenagers – even if you need to text them the link?

5. A Promising Test for Pancreatic Cancer… From A Teenager (10:46)

I just love this one. Jack shares his story, how as a teenager he searched for and found a promising cure for pancreatic cancer. Motivated by the death of a close family friend, Jack shows some of my favorite attributes: thinking, process, initiative, perseverance, determination, courage…and humor. He’s a fantastic speaker and will keep your kids interested and engaged.

One of my favorite quotes:

“You don’t have to be a professor with multiple degrees to have your ideas valued…Just imagine what you could do.”

“He did that all by himself?” One of my daughters asked at the end. Yep, he did. And you can, too.

6. Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance (6:09)

With three kids, I’m always driving a car full of kids somewhere. As I was researching for this article, during each of my rides, I took the opportunity to ask whoever was in the car about their recommendations. This talk was recommended by a 16-year-old high school student. (Thank you, Bella!) I had seen it before and was so glad she liked it as much as I did.

Angela Lee Duckworth left her consulting career and became a 7th grade math teacher in the New York public school system. She was fascinated by what helped students succeed. This talk is the story of what she found.

Here’s a quick preview:

“Grit is passion and perseverance for very long-term goals. Grit is having stamina. Grit is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for the month, but for years, and working really hard to make that future a reality. Grit is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint. “

Need another reason to share this with your kid? Angela highlights that kids with grit are more likely to graduate…and be successful in their chosen careers.

We all know how important grit and perseverance are; let’s help our children see that.

7. Dare To Dream Big (8:49)

With just over 22,000 views, this video hasn’t hit “mainstream” TED world yet, but Isabella Rose Taylor, a freshman in college and a working fashion designer, tells a fantastic story.

“Today I want to talk to you about dreams and stories.”

She shares one of my favorite stories about the 4-minute mile and how belief is such an important part of success.

“They didn’t all the sudden get faster or stronger, they just believed it was possible.”

The rest of her talk is filled with lessons on dreaming big, believing in yourself, courage, authenticity, and the importance of relationships.

“We should aim as high as possible and dream big.”

Yes. We. Should.

8. Yup, I built a nuclear fusion reactor (3:26)

Even the title shows the confidence that 17-year-old Nuclear Physicist Taylor Wilson has. As he says…and proves,

“Kids can really change the world.”

I love his passion and confidence. He started out with a dream and ended up meeting the President.

9. Underwater Astonishments (5:18)

While this may not have any explicit life lessons, it’s incredibly interesting and fun to watch with kids. Approved by my 7-year-old, who said, “It was very interesting and I liked the pictures. I didn’t know an octopus could do that.”

The underlying lesson? For me, it shows how everything is incredible. When we look for beauty and awe, we will find it.

I also think it’s fascinating as Geologist David Gallow shares:

“And in a place where we thought no life at all, we find more life…there’s still 97 percent, and either that 97 percent is empty or just full of surprises.”

This teaches kids that there is so much in life and in their world to discover.

10. What Makes A Good Life? Lessons From the Longest Study on Happiness (12:40)

I’d say this talk is better for older kids. Robert Waldinger shares what makes a good life, from the longest study in history on happiness.

If your kids are having a hard time getting into it, head to 5:51 for the highlights:

“So what have we learned? What are the lessons that come from the tens of thousands of pages of information that we’ve generated on these lives? Well, the lessons aren’t about wealth or fame or working harder and harder. The clearest message that we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period.”

I love the focus on the importance of relationships and friendships.

11. The Happy Secret To Better Work (12:14)

Positive Psychologist Shawn Achor is funny, fast and witty. He begins his talk with an incredibly funny story about his sister and him when they were little.

He shares that:

“90 percent of your long-term happiness is predicted not by the external world, but by the way your brain processes the world. And if we change it, if we change our formula for happiness and success, we can change the way that we can then affect reality.”

If you want to get to the essence, head to 9:09 for his suggestions.

This is another one that’s probably best for older kids and teenagers.

12. Weird, or Just Different? (2:35)

The shortest talk on this list, Derek Sivers talks about the power of perspective. It teaches kids that we all have a different lens through which we see the world and we need to be aware of our assumptions and bias.

One of Derek’s thoughts:

Advertising

There’s a saying that whatever true thing you can say about India, the opposite is also true. So, let’s never forget…that whatever brilliant ideas you have or hear, that the opposite may also be true.

My daughter’s thoughts: “It shows we can both be right.” YES.

13. Living Beyond Limits (9:44)

When I said earlier that I would let my 7-year-old watch all of these talks, this might be my one exception. Amy Purdy’s message is incredible but with an illness and near-death experience, it could be scary for little ones.

When she was just 19, Amy got bacterial meningitis and after a long fight for her life, she survived, but lost both legs below the knee. Now, a pro-snowboarder, she shows how “It’s believing in those dreams and facing our fears head-on that allows us to live our lives beyond our limits.”

Her message:

“If your life was a book, and you were the author, how would you want your story to go?”

As my daughter and her friend watched this video, they loved Amy, were completely engaged by her story and got this lesson – “Don’t give up on our dreams just because something bad happens.”

14. 8 Secrets of Success (3:26)

In this short video, Analyst Richard St. John condenses a decade of research on success into three minutes. It’s a two-hour presentation he gives to high school students on what’s needed to be successful. Quick. Fast. Interesting with lots of great life lessons including serving, persisting, hard work and passion.

15. Nature. Beauty. Gratitude. (9:47)

The title says it all.

Filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg’s beautiful cinematic time lapse imagery is paired with words of perspective from a little girl and an elderly man about what makes life so beautiful.

It may feel slow for some kids, but contains a compelling and valuable message.

I loved when the little girl shared her perspective about why we should be exploring nature and not watching TV and when the elderly gentlemen shared these thoughts:

“You think this is just another day in your life? It’s not just another day. It’s the one day that is given to you today. It’s given to you. It’s a gift. It’s the only gift that you have right now, and the only appropriate response is gratefulness.”

Kids might also find it interesting why we say OMG. I did.

16. Why Some Of Us Don’t Have One True Calling (12:26)

This is a great talk, especially for high school students who are trying to figure out what to do with their life! In my coaching practice, this question still evokes a sense of stress, whether someone is going into high school, graduating from college, or in a mid-life career change.

Emilie’s powerful message:

If you have multiple dreams, goals and interests, “There’s nothing wrong with you. What you are, is a multipotentialite. Someone with many interests and creative pursuits.”

The statistics back up this concept. Studies have shown that only 27 percent of college grads have a job related to their major; the average person changes jobs 10-15 times during his or her career; and people change careers anywhere from 3-7 times over the course of their lifetime.

Emilie then goes on to share the skills and benefits of being a multipotentialite, complete with examples of successful individuals who have created a life that works for them.

My absolute favorite message from this talk is one that I’m deeply aligned with in my coaching practice:

“We should all be designing lives and careers that are aligned with how we’re wired… Embracing our inner wiring leads to a happier, more authentic life.”

Amen.

Advertising

17. How I Harnessed the Wind (5:52)

Incredible and inspiring. At the age of 14, William Kamkwamba, with very little education or resources, motivated by poverty and famine, created a windmill to power his family’s home. As he looked at his life, he felt that what he was living was a fate he couldn’t accept. So rather than live the life he was “destined” to live, he decided to change it.

Not only is this story about courage, drive and innovation, it will also help kids gain perspective about what others in the world are facing on a daily basis.

He closes with these words of wisdom:

“I would like to say something to all the people out there like me, to the Africans, and the poor who are struggling with your dreams. God bless. Maybe one day you will watch this on the Internet. I say to you, trust yourself and believe. Whatever happens, don’t give up.”

BONUS: I Think We All Need a Pep Talk (3:28)

Ok, so it’s not officially a TED Talk, but it was on their site[1] and I just had to include it! Many of you have probably seen this Soul Pancake video before. I don’t need to say much. Just watch it.

Here are three of my favorite lines from 9-year old “Kid President”:

“We’re all on the same team.”
“We were made to be awesome.”
“Give the world a reason to dance, so get to it.”

Now What? Watch these with your kids!

Now that you’ve read through these options, it’s time to pick a few and watch them with your kid(s). I recommend you choose three that are relevant to your family, a situation your kid is in, a life lesson you feel is important for them to learn, or something that you’re just excited to share.

That’s the easy part. Now you have to get them to watch it!

Here are a few recommendations for sharing these with your kids:

1. Share your thoughts and a few W’s

Who is this talk about, why you think it’s important for them to watch and what you think they’ll find interesting. Get them hooked before they watch it. Giving them high-level context will not only get them interested, but get their minds primed for learning.

2. After you watch the video, have a discussion.

Not sure what to ask? Here are some ideas:

  • What did you think of the video?
  • What did you enjoy?
  • What do you think motivated this speaker to speak on this topic?
  • What did you learn?
  • What do you think you’ll do differently as a result of watching this?

3. Ask them to stick with it and be patient.

When I started testing these with my daughters, I could see in the first minute they were wondering if they really wanted to do this. I asked them to be patient, keep an open mind and stick with it. Once they got through the initial, “Ugh, Mom!”…. they enjoyed watching.

Lucky for you, the ones they couldn’t get through didn’t make this cut! Watch one (maybe two) at time. Stick with the age minus one rule.

I loved researching these talks, watching them with my kids and their friends, and hearing their thoughts and reactions. I hope they provide a great discussion for you and your family, some inspiration for your kids and something that moves, motivates and challenges you both.

I’d love to hear which of these resonated with you and your kids – and if you have other favorite TED talks you think would be great for kids, please let me know!

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

Read Next