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You Will Be So Fly After Reading These 5 Books On How To Smooth Talk

You Will Be So Fly After Reading These 5 Books On How To Smooth Talk

Admit it. We like people to buy into our ideas and beliefs. We like to know that we are right and when others agree, it validates your value and intelligence. We constantly persuade people intentionally and unintentionally. Sales people persuade others to buy; marketers persuade audiences to like; you persuade your boss to give you a raise. There is no way we can deny that persuasion is the modern killing-skill to play in anyone’s career. Yet there are some who seem to have this skill mastered a lot better than others. Fortunately, we have curated a selection of books for you to step up your persuasion game and take what is yours.

To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others by Daniel H. Pink

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, every day more than fifteen million people earn their keep by persuading someone else to make a purchase. This book is about human behaviour, motivation, and about how EVERYONE “sells”.

    To Sell Is Human reveals the new ABCs of moving others (it’s no longer “Always about Closing”), and explains why extraverts don’t make the best salespeople. Pink gives practical frameworks and theories to closing the deal. The book is incredibly informative, and is recommended for everyone who has a job or even any kind of relationship with that involves some form of persuasion.

    Reading duration: 3hrs 51mins

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    Get To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others from Amazon at $12.87

    Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

      What is a sticky idea? It is an idea that is so impressive the audience can remember and adopt. In the book Made to Stick, the authors offer six principles to developing a sticky idea. Readers are encouraged to think about a big idea and test with these six principles that include simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions and stories.

      The book itself adopted the principles, providing a lot of stories (examples) from the non-profit sector, how these organisations work hard to spread the message across, including examples of charities which used the mother-Teresa effect.

      Reading duration: 4hrs 7mins

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      Get Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die from Amazon at $14.31

      Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive by Noah J. Goldstein, Robert B. Cialdini, Steve J. Martin

        Small changes can make a big difference in your powers of persuasion. While we believe human communication is a form of social science, the book tries to decipher human persuasion with science and provide us with practical tricks to be more persuasive.

        The authors pointed out researchers who studied persuasion have uncovered a series of hidden rules for moving people in your direction. Here is the sneak peek to some of his principles to persuasive expressions – Reciprocation (mirroring what others do can increase liking); and scarcity, we all know the effect of the “Last piece” on all shopaholics. The book offers more of these useful scientific findings that are easily applicable to the daily conversation and even in a business setting.

        Reading duration: 3hrs 52mins

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        Get Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive from Amazon at $5.76

        Ogilvy on Advertising by David Ogilvy

          This cannot be a persuasive booklist without a slight touch from the advertising giant David Ogilvy. Although this read was written decades ago and contains information that may be considered outdated (especially since advertising has been evolving and with the emergence of the internet), a lot of it is still sound and relevant. Examples in the books are all classic, well-known advertisements/campaigns, including the Got Milk campaign.

          Advertising is the industry of persuasion, and we certainly can take away a lot of tips from this billion revenue industry to apply to our business persuasion.

          Reading duration: 3hrs 10mins

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          Get Ogilvy on Advertising from Amazon at $21.47

          Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger

            Contagious is the book to look for if you need an alternative to traditional advertisements. Berger offers insights into the most powerful free promotion ever – word of mouth.

            Why do people talk about certain products and ideas more than others? Why are some stories and rumours more infectious? And what makes online content go viral?

            The award-winning read combines real business stories with consumer behaviour psychology to support how you can persuade your customers to buy certain products, essentially revealing the secrets to businesses that can successfully create word of mouth among its customers as a free promotion. This is certainly a book to read for people aiming to grow their businesses and get noticed among the crowd without spending big money.e

            Reading duration: 3hrs 37mins

            Get Contagious: Why Things Catch On from Amazon at $7.77

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            Last Updated on February 11, 2021

            Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

            Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

            How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

            Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

            The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

            Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

            Perceptual Barrier

            The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

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            The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

            The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

            Attitudinal Barrier

            Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

            The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

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            The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

            Language Barrier

            This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

            The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

            The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

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            Emotional Barrier

            Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

            The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

            The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

            Cultural Barrier

            Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

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            The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

            The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

            Gender Barrier

            Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

            The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

            The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

            And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

            Reference

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