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Last Updated on February 27, 2018

You Will Be So Fly After Reading These 5 Books On How To Smooth Talk

You Will Be So Fly After Reading These 5 Books On How To Smooth Talk

Admit it. We like people to buy into our ideas and beliefs. We like to know that we are right and when others agree, it validates your value and intelligence. We constantly persuade people intentionally and unintentionally. Sales people persuade others to buy; marketers persuade audiences to like; you persuade your boss to give you a raise. There is no way we can deny that persuasion is the modern killing-skill to play in anyone’s career. Yet there are some who seem to have this skill mastered a lot better than others. Fortunately, we have curated a selection of books for you to step up your persuasion game and take what is yours.

To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others by Daniel H. Pink

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, every day more than fifteen million people earn their keep by persuading someone else to make a purchase. This book is about human behaviour, motivation, and about how EVERYONE “sells”.

    To Sell Is Human reveals the new ABCs of moving others (it’s no longer “Always about Closing”), and explains why extraverts don’t make the best salespeople. Pink gives practical frameworks and theories to closing the deal. The book is incredibly informative, and is recommended for everyone who has a job or even any kind of relationship with that involves some form of persuasion.

    Reading duration: 3hrs 51mins

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    Get To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others from Amazon at $12.87

    Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

      What is a sticky idea? It is an idea that is so impressive the audience can remember and adopt. In the book Made to Stick, the authors offer six principles to developing a sticky idea. Readers are encouraged to think about a big idea and test with these six principles that include simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions and stories.

      The book itself adopted the principles, providing a lot of stories (examples) from the non-profit sector, how these organisations work hard to spread the message across, including examples of charities which used the mother-Teresa effect.

      Reading duration: 4hrs 7mins

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      Get Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die from Amazon at $14.31

      Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive by Noah J. Goldstein, Robert B. Cialdini, Steve J. Martin

        Small changes can make a big difference in your powers of persuasion. While we believe human communication is a form of social science, the book tries to decipher human persuasion with science and provide us with practical tricks to be more persuasive.

        The authors pointed out researchers who studied persuasion have uncovered a series of hidden rules for moving people in your direction. Here is the sneak peek to some of his principles to persuasive expressions – Reciprocation (mirroring what others do can increase liking); and scarcity, we all know the effect of the “Last piece” on all shopaholics. The book offers more of these useful scientific findings that are easily applicable to the daily conversation and even in a business setting.

        Reading duration: 3hrs 52mins

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        Get Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive from Amazon at $5.76

        Ogilvy on Advertising by David Ogilvy

          This cannot be a persuasive booklist without a slight touch from the advertising giant David Ogilvy. Although this read was written decades ago and contains information that may be considered outdated (especially since advertising has been evolving and with the emergence of the internet), a lot of it is still sound and relevant. Examples in the books are all classic, well-known advertisements/campaigns, including the Got Milk campaign.

          Advertising is the industry of persuasion, and we certainly can take away a lot of tips from this billion revenue industry to apply to our business persuasion.

          Reading duration: 3hrs 10mins

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          Get Ogilvy on Advertising from Amazon at $21.47

          Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger

            Contagious is the book to look for if you need an alternative to traditional advertisements. Berger offers insights into the most powerful free promotion ever – word of mouth.

            Why do people talk about certain products and ideas more than others? Why are some stories and rumours more infectious? And what makes online content go viral?

            The award-winning read combines real business stories with consumer behaviour psychology to support how you can persuade your customers to buy certain products, essentially revealing the secrets to businesses that can successfully create word of mouth among its customers as a free promotion. This is certainly a book to read for people aiming to grow their businesses and get noticed among the crowd without spending big money.e

            Reading duration: 3hrs 37mins

            Get Contagious: Why Things Catch On from Amazon at $7.77

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            The Gentle Art of Saying No

            The Gentle Art of Saying No

            No!

            It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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            But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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            What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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            But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

            1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
            2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
            3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
            4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
            5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
            6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
            7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
            8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
            9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
            10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

            Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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