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Does Learning Everything Make You Good at Nothing?

Does Learning Everything Make You Good at Nothing?

How would you define an expert? Experts tend to be seen as people who are extremely focused in one area and devote much of their time towards gaining and expanding knowledge in their particular subject. Repetitive practice, time and effort is usually thought of as the way to become truly talented and knowledgable in your one field. But is this really the case?

Why Being Too Focused Slows Us Down

While being solely focused on one thing can seem like the logical way to become an expert, it can actually have a detrimental effect on how we gain knowledge efficiently.

By focusing for too long and too much in one area, we are actually stopping ourselves from opening up to different thoughts, perspectives and connected subjects. When our brain enters focused learning mode, it puts all its energy and concentration on the one subject.

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This causes us to develop a set framework and mindset to approach a problem and limits our thinking and perspectives. The necessary stimulation that could help you think in new and different ways is hindered therefore, while practice does seem to make perfect, how you approach your practice is key to becoming a true expert.

The Key Learning Mode to Becoming an Expert

There are two major learning modes when it comes to our brain. One is focused learning mode which is when our mind is very concentrated and occupied entirely by the task or subject. The other learning mode is diffused thinking which is when our brain is in a more relaxed, free-flowing state and it’s in this mode that we can get inspiration and creative ideas on a subject we didn’t really spend time focusing on.

Diffuse mode takes your attention or pressure off a subject and allows your conscious mind to feel almost mindless. This allows ideas and framework-free, flowing connection within the brain. Focused mode could be doing a marathon study session with no distractions but diffused mode would be implemented through breaks, going for a walk, listening to music or exercising. In other words, taking part in an activity where your mind is seemingly free from focused thought.

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How Does This Fit in With Learning Effectively?

Effective learning and becoming an expert isn’t all about focusing on one skill. Real experts take a skill they’re good at and use it in different areas.

Paul Graham is a British computer scientist with engineering as his primary skill. However, he’s also managed to become an expert entrepreneur, venture capitalist, author and blogger. He has helped dozens of well-known companies such as Dropbox and Airbnb alongside publishing books and writing dozens of articles on various subjects.

What’s the secret to Paul’s success? He takes his engineering expertise but instead of solely focusing on this one skill, he uses the knowledge of engineering concepts to break down problems and suggest solutions for businesses.

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The key to becoming an expert is to find connections between the framework of your expertise and other areas, applying the concepts to new things. By doing this, you can create new solutions and help yourself to practice your expertise at the same time.

The ability to utilise fundamental skills makes you the true expert

Steve Jobs didn’t just limit himself to computer science, he constantly reached to outgrow himself by thinking of unique and original elements that added value to his expertise. He made the realisation that computers shouldn’t just be a tool but could have the potential to be stylish and beautifully designed making them fashionable, everyday items. Combining these two concepts of design and engineering is how the MacBook was created and this thinking is exactly how Apple manage to outgrow their competitors every time.

Becoming an expert and focusing on those sets of skills is crucial for basic success. But what will make you grow and become even more successful is allowing yourself to learn new things that stimulate your thinking. This constant evolving new ideas is how you progress your learning in your expertise.

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Becoming an expert is about combining ideas that help create innovative out-of-the-box solutions. The key is, when learning something new, ask yourself how can I apply this to what I already know? By doing this you stop being stagnant and you create new pathways that can take you to new heights and successes.

Featured photo credit: Startup Stock Photos via pexels.com

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Leon Ho

Founder & CEO of Lifehack

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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