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Knowledge Is Power: 6 Rules Successful People Live by to Teach Themselves Everything

Knowledge Is Power: 6 Rules Successful People Live by to Teach Themselves Everything
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What if I told you that you can learn just about anything you are interested in, in a timely and cost-effective way? With so many time-constraints in our daily life, our education is being constantly halted. With the practice of self-education, your future is back in your hands.

Self-education will make you a fortune.

Self-education is extremely important for your future and it’s one of the most effective ways to increase your knowledge on whichever topic you may be interested in. Jim Rohn,[1] America’s Foremost Business Philosopher, once said: “Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune.” The world is changing so rapidly, by having the self-education skill, you can learn almost anything you choose to and stay on the edge in the information age and avoid becoming obsolete.

If you are wondering what self-education means and how to put it in practice, you have come to the right place! Self-education means the self-guided learning process anyone can take in order to better improve their knowledge. The methods implied focus more on practical knowledge rather than theoretical one which, for most people, makes it easier to learn and later remember. Self-education also relies on the notion that, by educating yourself, you will get some sort of return such as a job promotion or an improvement in your earning ability.[2]

Learning new skills can double you chance of success.

Self-education lets you take control of your life by allowing you to improve any skills you need in order to reach your goals. You may even acquire a whole new set of skills. Apart from being a powerful tool to further help you educate yourself, self-education can also be an incredible way to learn something entirely new! A recent study conducted by Stack Overflow[3] found that 69.1% of software developers appear to be self-taught!

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Self-education can help you take the first step towards success. For example, if you are planing to change your job, consider educating yourself further on the particular industry you want to switch to. This newly acquired knowledge will increase your chance of adapting and quickly succeeding at your new job.

On the other hand, self-education can help you take that extra step on the road to success. Let’s say you are a salesman. By taking the time to educate yourself on new sales techniques, you are likely to later increase your sales and improve your closing rates.

Self-education isn’t easy. That’s why you need to prepare for it.

Self-education can be a liberating practice that helps you understand your learning styles and how to teach yourself effectively.

But as you may have noticed by now, self-education is no easy task. The practice of self-education presupposes that you follow a specific schedule and the right resources in order to teach yourself correct information in a time-effective manner.

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Now that you have a better understanding of the concept, the pros, and the cons of self-education, we will give you some useful tips on how to turn this concept into a useful reality.

1. Start with something you like

Whether you would like to progress in your career or get a new hobby, self-education can help you as long as you find a specific interest you would like to further educate yourself on. Having an interest is vitally important when it comes to learning. Some studies[4] found that “interest can help us think more clearly, understand more deeply, and remember more accurately.” If you are unsure of your interest, start by making a list of specific goals you would like to reach and then make a list of skills required in order to achieve your goals.

2. Find the right sources

More important than learning something is to learn something factual and proven. Make sure that your sources are reliable by reading some reviews about that specific website, book, YouTube channel. Speaking of YouTube, non-traditional sources such as YouTube or online podcasts can be hugely useful.

3. Grab a book

Reading[5] can help you become more successful. Nobody has all the answers but everybody can find a book or books to learn more about the topic and become an expert. When Elon Musk[6] was asked by people how he learned to build rockets, he simply said “I read books!” The ability and the willingness to learn is the most important asset anyone can have.

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“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.” – Harry S. Truman

4. Assign time for learning

Make sure that you are not making excuses when it comes to making time to learn. By giving yourself a certain amount of time to solely focus on self-education, and even establishing deadlines to finish specific topics, you are increasing your chances that your time-investment will quickly lead to big results.

5. Don’t forget to test yourself

Don’t be scared to put your knowledge to practice. Once you feel confident enough to try something new, don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Practical education can be a powerful tool when it comes to helping you further cement your knowledge. The ultimate goal will always be to put theory into a practical and useful skill.

6. Commit to life-long learning

Never stop learning! With the widespread use of the internet, you can have access to extremely useful information anywhere. Use that to your advantage and to constantly update your knowledge and intermittently better yourself.

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Besides online learning, you can also continue your education from workshops, networking events and personal development seminars in your city or local area. There are so many unparalleled benefits[7] you can get from attending live events and seminars that you cannot simply get by reading books or searching on the internet. You might be able to access exclusive information which is not available anywhere else. You can ask the experts directly and receive personal advice and recommendations.

Your ability and commitment to lifelong learning is critical to your success. By dedicating yourself to learning and growing everyday, you can get ahead in every aspect of life and achieve the goals you set out for yourself. The dream life you always want to have might just be one book away, one seminar away or one skill away. Keep on learning and applying what you’ve learned and you will eventually get there.

Reference

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Liem Nguyen

Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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