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10 Best Standing Desks That Are High in Quality and Cheap in Price

10 Best Standing Desks That Are High in Quality and Cheap in Price

There are a surplus of articles on the Internet talking about the harmful impact of too much sitting. It increases the risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer. And somehow, all of the gym sessions and exercises might not offset the health issues caused by sitting too much.

Don’t worry, I’m not going to scare you with more facts and negative health effects of sitting too long. But what we need to do is to combat this sedentary lifestyle, and standing desks seem to be the best option.

How is a standing desk going to help?

A study in 2015[1] shows that by combining exercising and standing, you can increase your life expectancy potentially even more. The more you move around, you’ll burn more calories, and it helps your heart to function better, which in turn lessen your risk of chronic diseases.

Another research[2] suggests that workers who stand are more productive than those who remain seated. The study shows a tremendous increase in productivity after 6 months.

Here are 10 best affordable standing desk options for you, and I have arranged them according to their prices!

1. Readaeer Adjustable Foldable Laptop Stand ($30)

    Credit: Aeropost

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    This is technically not a standing desk, but this laptop stand is a great alternative for you if you don’t want to invest a whole lot. Just put this on an existing desk and you are done!

    • Price tier: Very low
    • For who: Students, people with home offices

    2. IKEA-Hacked Standing Desk ($33-$38)

      ▲ The $22 Ikea Hack. Credit: Lateral

      If you want a cheap standing desk, you should consider “The $22 Ikea Hack”. With a side table, a shelf, two brackets, and screws, you can create your own standing desk using solely Ikea products. (With the similar items found on Ikea’s website, the standing desk costs a little bit more.)

      • Price tier: Very low
      • For who: Scrappy people on a budget

      3. IKEA Norberg Wall-Mounted Desk ($39)

        Credit: Gumtree

        A wall-mounted desk is one of the cheapest and simplest types of standing desk you can get. It offers a minimalist design to satisfy your aesthetic tastebuds, and saves a lot of space. You can also use it as a shelf. The only downside is you can’t adjust it freely.

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        • Price tier: Very low
        • For who: Minimalists, people living in a small space

        4. Alvin MiniMaster Adjustable Drafting Table ($120)

          Credit: Artist Supply Source

          This is another example of adding a new purpose to an existing furniture. Compared to standing desks, drafting tables are more affordable. It comes with wheels and an adjustable board (you can adjust it between 0 to 30 degrees). There’s also a drawer to keep your gadgets in place.

          • Price tier: Low
          • For who: Everyone

          5. Birch Standing Desk Conversion Kit ($160)

            Credit: Amazon

            Similar to the laptop stand, this adjustable kit sits on top of your existing desk. You don’t have to buy a brand new standing desk and the birchwood looks fine and nice.

            • Price tier: Low
            • For who: Everyone

            6. Safco Muv Stand Up Desk With Keyboard Shelf ($199)

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              Credit: Sunny Kart

              This is a fancier standing desk option. This desk not only has wheels, but also shelf spaces. There’s a shelf for your keyboard, another for your computer, and one for all the miscellaneous things. Plus, its slim design saves a lot of space.

              • Price tier: Middle
              • For who: Everyone, especially people working in tight, small office areas

              7. Refold Cardboard Standing Desk ($250-300)

                Credit: DailyTekk

                Believe it or not, this cardboard standing desk is very sturdy. It saves tons of space, and when you are done with it, you can recycle it.

                • Price tier: Middle
                • For who: Artistic minimalists, creatives, environmentally-conscious people

                8. Rebel Up Standing Desk ($499)

                  Credit: Cult of Mac

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                  Just like some other desks, the height is adjustable, so what makes this standing desk different? Well, take a look at the side, and there are two outlets and two USB ports for you to charge your gadgets simultaneously. And you can choose the desktop color!

                  • Price tier: High
                  • For who: Tech-savvy people

                  9. 60″ Electric Stand Up Desk ($549)

                    Credit: NotSitting.com

                    Similar to the Rebel Up Standing Desk, this one comes with a power cable and a large working space. One thing that stands out is you don’t need to crank the handle to adjust the heights, simply push a button. Also, it comes with wheels, which makes it easier to move around.

                    • Price tier: High
                    • For who: Tech-savvy people, people working in offices

                    10. DIY Standing Desk (cost varies)

                      ▲ DIY Pipe Standing Desk. Credit: Brian Hirschy

                      If the previous 9 suggestions haven’t impressed you, it might be a sign that you secretly want to build your own standing desk. You can go the easy and affordable route,[3] or be industrial and artistic about it.

                      • Price tier: It depends
                      • For who: DIY-ers

                      I hope you have found the best affordable standing desk and start moving those legs!

                      Reference

                      More by this author

                      Frank Yung

                      Writer. Storyteller. Foodie.

                      Your Future Self Will Thank You For Starting To Do This For Only 10 Minutes Every Day 10 Best Standing Desks That Are High in Quality and Cheap in Price Finally, a Way to Avoid Jet Lag: The Jet Lag Calculator The Best Places Around the World to Retire in 2017 Take 5 Minutes To Read And Improve Your Writing Skills Forever

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                      1 How To Write Effective Meeting Minutes (with Examples) 2 How Are Daily Rituals Different from Daily Routines? 3 7 Essential Success Tips to Achieve What You Want in Life 4 Deep Work: 9 Grounding Rules to Stay Focused 5 7 Reminders When You’re Making Life Choices

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                      Last Updated on September 30, 2019

                      How To Write Effective Meeting Minutes (with Examples)

                      How To Write Effective Meeting Minutes (with Examples)

                      Minutes are a written record of a board, company, or organizational meeting. Meeting minutes are considered a legal document, so when writing them, strive for clarity and consistency of tone.

                      Because minutes are a permanent record of the meeting, be sure to proofread them well before sending. It is a good idea to run them by a supervisor or seasoned attendee to make sure statements and information are accurately captured.

                      The best meeting minutes takers are careful listeners, quick typists, and are adequately familiar with the meeting topics and attendees. The note taker must have a firm enough grasp of the subject matter to be able to separate the important points from the noise in what can be long, drawn-out discussions. And, importantly, the note taker should not simultaneously lead and take notes. (If you’re ever asked to do so, decline.)

                      Following, are some step-by-step hints to effectively write meeting minutes:

                      1. Develop an Agenda

                      Work with the Chairperson or Board President to develop a detailed agenda.

                      Meetings occur for a reason, and the issues to be addressed and decided upon need to be listed to alert attendees. Work with the convener to draft an agenda that assigns times to each topic to keep the meeting moving and to make sure the group has enough time to consider all items.

                      The agenda will serve as your outline for the meeting minutes. Keep the minutes’ headings consistent with the agenda topics for continuity.

                      2. Follow a Template from Former Minutes Taken

                      If you are new to a Board or organization, and are writing minutes for the first time, ask to see the past meeting minutes so that you can maintain the same format.

                      Generally, the organization name or the name of the group that is meeting goes at the top: “Meeting of the Board of Directors of XYZ,” with the date on the next line. After the date, include both the time the meeting came to order and the time the meeting ended.

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                      Most groups who meet do so regularly, with set agenda items at each meeting. Some groups include a Next Steps heading at the end of the minutes that lists projects to follow up on and assigns responsibility.

                      A template from a former meeting will also help determine whether or not the group records if a quorum was met, and other items specific to the organization’s meeting minutes.

                      3. Record Attendance

                      On most boards, the Board Secretary is the person responsible for taking the meeting minutes. In organizational meetings, the minutes taker may be a project coordinator or assistant to a manager or CEO. She or he should arrive a few minutes before the meeting begins and pass around an attendance sheet with all members’ names and contact information.

                      Meeting attendees will need to check off their names and make edits to any changes in their information. This will help as both a back-up document of attendees and ensure that information goes out to the most up-to-date email addresses.

                      All attendees’ names should be listed directly below the meeting name and date, under a subheading that says “Present.” List first and last names of all attendees, along with title or affiliation, separated by a comma or semi-colon.

                      If a member of the Board could not attend the meeting, cite his or her name after the phrase: “Copied To:” There may be other designations in the participants’ list. For example, if several of the meeting attendees are members of the staff while everyone else is a volunteer, you may want to write (Staff) after each staff member.

                      As a general rule, attendees are listed alphabetically by their last names. However, in some organizations, it’s a best practice to list the leadership of the Board first. In that case, the President or Co-Presidents would be listed first, followed by the Vice President, followed by the Secretary, and then by the Treasurer. Then all other names of attendees would be alphabetized by last name.

                      It is also common practice to note if a participant joined the meeting via conference call. This can be indicated by writing: “By Phone” and listing the participants who called in.

                      4. Naming Convention

                      Generally, the first time someone speaks in the meeting will include his or her name and often the title.

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                      For example, “President of the XYZ Board, Roger McGowan, called the meeting to order.” The next time Roger McGowan speaks, though, you can simply refer to him as “Roger.” If there are two Rogers in the meeting, use an initial for their last names to separate the two. “Roger M. called for a vote. Roger T. abstained.”

                      5. What, and What Not, to Include

                      Depending on the nature of the meeting, it could last from one to several hours. The attendees will be asked to review and then approve the meeting minutes. Therefore, you don’t want the minutes to extend into a lengthy document.

                      Capturing everything that people say verbatim is not only unnecessary, but annoying to reviewers.

                      For each agenda item, you ultimately want to summarize only the relevant points of the discussion along with any decisions made. After the meeting, cull through your notes, making sure to edit out any circular or repetitive arguments and only leave in the relevant points made.

                      6. Maintain a Neutral Tone

                      Minutes are a legal document. They are used to establish an organization’s historical record of activity. It is essential to maintain an even, professional tone. Never put inflammatory language in the minutes, even if the language of the meeting becomes heated.

                      You want to record the gist of the discussion objectively, which means mentioning the key points covered without assigning blame. For example, “The staff addressed board members’ questions regarding the vendor’s professionalism.”

                      Picture a lawyer ten years down the road reading the minutes to find evidence of potential wrongdoing. You wouldn’t want an embellishment in the form of a colorful adverb or a quip to cloud any account of what took place. Here’s a list of neutral sounding words to get started with.

                      7. Record Votes

                      The primary purpose of minutes is to record any votes a board or organization takes. Solid record-keeping requires mentioning which participant makes a motion — and what the motion states verbatim — and which participant seconds the motion.

                      For example, “Vice President Cindy Jacobsen made a motion to dedicate 50 percent, or $50,000, of the proceeds from the ZZZ Foundation gift to the CCC scholarship fund. President Roger McGowan seconded the motion.”

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                      This vote tabulation should be expressed in neutral language as well. “The Board voted unanimously to amend the charter in the following way,” or “The decision to provide $1,000 to the tree-planting effort passed 4 to 1, with Board President McGowan opposing.”

                      Most Boards try to get a vote passed unanimously. Sometimes in order to help the Board attain a more cohesive outcome, a Board member may abstain from voting. “The motion passed 17 to 1 with one absension.”

                      8. Pare down Notes Post-Meeting

                      Following the meeting, read through your notes while all the discussions remain fresh in your mind, and make any needed revisions. Then, pare the meeting minutes down to their essentials, providing a brief account of the discussion that summarizes arguments made for and against a decision.

                      People often speak colloquially or in idioms, as in: “This isn’t even in the ballpark” or “You’re beginning to sound like a broken record.” While you may be tempted to keep the exact language in the minutes to add color, resist.

                      Additionally, if any presentations are part of the meeting, do not include information from the Powerpoint in the minutes. However, you will want to record the key points from the post-presentation discussion.

                      9. Proofread with Care

                      Make sure that you spelled all names correctly, inserted the correct date of the meeting, and that your minutes read clearly.

                      Spell out acronyms the first time they’re used. Remember that the notes may be reviewed by others for whom the acronyms are unfamiliar. Stay consistent in headings, punctuation, and formatting. The minutes should be polished and professional.

                      10. Distribute Broadly

                      Once approved, email minutes to the full board — not just the attendees — for review. Your minutes will help keep those who were absent apprised of important actions and decisions.

                      At the start of the next meeting, call for the approval of the minutes. Note any revisions. Try to work out the agreed-upon changes in the meeting, so that you don’t spend a huge amount of time on revisions.

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                      Ask for a motion to approve the minutes with the agreed-upon changes. Once an attendee offers a motion, ask for another person in the meeting to “second” the motion. They say, “All approved.” Always ask if there is anyone who does not approve. Assuming not, then say: “The minutes from our last meeting are approved once the agreed-upon changes have been made.”

                      11. File Meticulously

                      Since minutes are a legal document, take care when filing them. Make sure the file name of the document is consistent with the file names of previously filed minutes.

                      Occasionally, members of the organization may want to review past minutes. Know where the minutes are filed!

                      One Caveat

                      In this day and age of high technology, you may ask yourself: Wouldn’t it be simpler to record the meeting? This depends on the protocols of the organization, but probably not.

                      Be sure to ask what the rules are at the organization where you are taking minutes. Remember that the minutes are a record of what was done at the meeting, not what was said at the meeting.

                      The minutes reflect decisions not discussions. In spite of their name, “minutes,” the minutes are not a minute-by-minute transcript.

                      Bottom Line

                      Becoming an expert minutes-taker requires a keen ear, a willingness to learn, and some practice, but by following these tips you will soon become proficient.

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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