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This Is The List You Can Try If You Find “To-Do-List” Not Useful To You!

This Is The List You Can Try If You Find “To-Do-List” Not Useful To You!

We all have the tendency to stock up work. We desire to achieve various targets, and it is easy for us to accumulate a list of work until it gets too overwhelming.

We Keep doing a To-Do-List..But it doesn’t really help.

Time seems to be never enough for you although every single person practically got the same amount of hours per day. A lot of us may keep a To-Do List for staying on track of what we are doing, but deep down we all know it is just a bunch of wishing thinking and half of the list will be never be finished and forgotten simply due to the fact that its seems physically impossible to complete it.

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Author William J. Reilly suggested in his book How to avoid work the 3 most common excuses we use when we fail to do something:

  1. ‘I haven’t the time.’
  2. ‘I haven’t the money.’
  3. ‘My folks don’t want me to.’

But is it true? Is it an unavoidable cause, or did we subconsciously put ourselves into this situation?Author Jim Collins suggested his way out of this dilemma: don’t focus on the things that you need to do, focus on those that you can stop doing.

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We need a reminder on things we should avoid doing too.

Write a “stop doing” list rather than a To-Do List.Steve Jobs once said the success of Apple is largely due to the projects they choose to not do. Instead of trying to achieve everything in your scope, we should pick those that worth our effort.

By considering the things we don’t need to do, we can greatly reduce the number of workload and maximise our benefits and output. This is where the “stop doing” list comes into play.

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So now you are starting to build your “stop doing” list, but then how can we distinguish the things that we should do and those we should stop doing? Collins suggested us to use the Hedgehog Concept.

Ask yourself 3 questions:

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1. What are you deeply passionate about?

Passion is a really important factor to consider as it is the key to empowering yourself in achieving a particular goal. Working on jobs that you are not passionate in is like driving a car without fuel— you won’t get far with it, and you won’t get much out of it.

2. What are you genetically encoded for — what activities do you feel just “made to do”?

We are all good at doing something. Your strength could be something that I lack of. We are also trained to function in different aspects of our society. So choose something that suits you in terms of your ability. Pick tasks you are comfortable with. You could have saved those time you used struggling to complete a task you are not familiar with.

3. What makes economic sense — what can you make a living at?

Sometimes you just have to be a realist. In reality we cannot achieve much of what we want without the sufficient economic power. Dreams will only be dreams when you got no cash. So pick the things that can builds your financial base.

So here comes the answers of what to put into your stop-doing list.

If you encounter something that makes you reply “No”,”No” and “No” for these 3 questions. You probably can put it into your “stop doing” list.So the next time when you start thinking of your new year resolution don’t simply jot down things that you can do. Start now with your “stop doing” list! Think of the things that made you feel miserable, things that you did because of obligations, and things that you thought could make your life better but never really did.Write them down, have a look at the list, and stop.

More by this author

Raphael Ha

Writer. Still waiting his chance to travel the world.

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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