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8 Tips To Safeguard Your Child’s Financial Security

8 Tips To Safeguard Your Child’s Financial Security

Securing your child’s financial future is one of the most important things you can do as a parent. 83% of Americans can’t afford to pay for college while millennials currently earn 20% less than Boomers did. The rate of home ownership is also lower for millennials while student loan debts are much higher compared to their parents.

Reasons for the current state of affairs include globalization and slow salary growth. Financial planning ensures that your child will have funds set aside for college and be well taken care of in case of a catastrophe. Here are a few tips to help you plan for your child’s future.

1. Open A Coverdell Education Savings Account

An ESA (Education Saving Account) will enable you to deposit up to $2,000 annually towards your child’s college tuition. The plan allows the funds to grow tax-deferred. ESA’s aren’t just for college expenses; they can also be applied towards elementary and secondary school costs.

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If you plan to invest more than $2,000 every year you may want to consider a 529 plan. It’s similar to an ESA plan except without the annual limit.

2. Consider A 529 College Plan

There are two types of 529 plans; pre-paid plans and savings plans. A pre-paid account allows parents to buy tuition credits for future use. The disadvantage of a pre-paid plan is that funds can only be applied towards tuition and not room and board.

A 529 savings plan consists of mutual funds investments which grow over time. Most plans consist of numerous investment options. Experts generally suggest investing more aggressively in stocks while the child is young and tapering off to a more conservative portfolio as your child gets older.

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Financial experts suggest funding the account to the maximum amount as soon as your child is born in order to maximize future growth. Automating 529 contributions at set intervals will ensure that the account will grow at a steady rate.

3. Draft An Updated Will

USA Today reports that 64% of American’s don’t have a will. Creating a will is imperative when it comes to protecting your child’s financial future. You will also need to designate a guardian to take care of your children and name a property guardian to manage your estate. Drafting a will doesn’t have to be expensive; Quicken’s Willmaker is affordable and easy to use.

4. Update Beneficiary Information

Make sure to update beneficiary designation is up-to-date on your life insurance policy, bank and retirement accounts. According to Loren Barr, a probate attorney at Barr & Young Attorneys in San Francisco, CA, the information on the beneficiary designation form will override your will. It’s important to update this information after major live events such as the birth of a child or divorce. Experts also suggest naming a contingent beneficiary in case the primary beneficiary predeceases you.

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5. Open A Custodial Account

A custodial account is one of the easiest accounts to open. It’s basically a savings account in your child’s name. The account will be accessible once your child turns 18 or 21 depending on their locality. The disadvantage is that the funds are taxable after the first $950. Your child will also have complete control once they become of age, which can either be a good or bad thing depending on their spending habits.

6. Get Life Insurance

Statistics show that only 62% of Americans have life insurance while 85% need it. 70% of households with minor children will have difficulties paying the bills if a primary wage earner were to pass away. The most common reasons for delaying life insurance is perceived cost. The average policy cost for a 35-year-old female non-smoker is just $61 per month. Inquire about life insurance in order to protect you family; it may be a lot cheaper than you think.

7. Save For Retirement

According to U.S News, the average Social Security benefit is just $1,180. Let’s face it; for most of us, that’s not going to be enough to live on. Saving for your own retirement can help your child’s future because they won’t have to provide for you financially in old age. If your work offers a 401k plan, start off by having a set amount of your paycheck deposited directly into your account. The earlier you start the more time you’ll have for your money to grow.

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8. Talk To Your Kids About Money

Financial literacy isn’t always stressed adequately in school. Encourage your teen children to get a job and save for what they want instead of handing them over money. Talk to your kids about the basics such as how to manage credit cards, a bank account and how to budget. Knowledge is one of the best gifts you can give to your child when it comes to money management.

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Jacqueline Cao

Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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