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How to Unleash Your Best Ideas and (Possibly) Turn Them Into a New Business

How to Unleash Your Best Ideas and (Possibly) Turn Them Into a New Business
People say your best ideas come when you least expect it. When you don’t squeeze your brain to think.

And they’re right. It does.

Nick Woodman invented GoPro after he went surfing and realized he couldn’t take pictures of himself.

    Photo Credit: Pitchi

    J.K. Rowling got the idea of Harry Potter as she sat on a 4-hour delayed train from Manchester to London.

      Photo Credit: Legion of Leia

      Ingvar Kampard launched Ikea after becoming frustrated at a table he bought and couldn’t fit into his car.

        Photo Credit: Jobstreet

        I’m not suggesting you should drop everything you’re doing to do whatever the heck you like (e.g. skip work to hang out with friends or watch TV instead of polishing up your resumé), to be like these successful entrepreneurs and hope that you’ll come up with a million dollar business.

        Overnight success doesn’t quite work like that. And it might be awhile until you do come up with a brilliant idea.

        So in the meantime:
        Focus on work and build a safety cushion against a crummy life. BUT whenever your mind is not “at work”, think about your current situation and how you can improve it, or how you can make an impact in this world.

        Because when you do, you bump up your chances of creating something that could be the next revolution. You may just think of something people might absolutely love that nobody has thought of, or has yet managed to push out in public. Something that could make you insanely famous.

        You could be the first.


        Now you might not feel motivated to do some extra thinking, especially when the bigger things in life demand more of your attention like your job, your customers, your body, your partner, your kids. But let me ask you, is this how you want to live the rest of your life, day after day after day? Abiding by society’s rules on what it takes to be successful?

          Probably not.

          The truth is, most of us get too caught up working at companies that only want us to perfect 1 or 2 skills, (Possibly 3 if your boss really believes in you). The longer we push ourselves towards this path, the less we care about uncovering our hidden talents.

          Don’t let yourself sink into this pitfall. Learn how to get out of it.

          If you’re told to keep a record of people you meet for business, don’t just ask for their phone number. Snapshot their business card and jot down notes.

          If you’re told to create Facebook ads (even though there’s no increase in profits for the past few months), learn to market on Instagram or Medium.

          If you’re told to answer customer support calls, create a FAQ page on your company page that tackles the most common questions.

          There’s always a better way of doing something, and sometimes thinking outside the box could lead to a newfound strength and eventually a full-fledged business.

          “You can’t have a million dollar dream with a minimum-wage work ethic.”
          ~Stephen C. Hogan

          Remember, our brains weren’t designed to master a few things. They were designed to expand, to become sharper and give us the edge to outdo everyone else.

          Because of that, you can still discover your hidden talents. Just keep thinking about how to improve your current situation and the world — it’s the first step great creators take to build their empire.

            Photo Credit: Funders & Founders

            So if you want to make an impact like these successful entrepreneurs, don’t just blindly work for a salary. Realize what you could do better at. And make it happen.

            Because one day, it could change your entire life. 

            Featured photo credit: Startup Stock Photos via startupstockphotos.com

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            Tiffany Sun

            Aspiring Writer

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            Last Updated on November 19, 2018

            How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

            How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

            I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

            Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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            1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

            A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

            2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

            Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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            3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

            One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

            4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

            On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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            5. Failure is often the best way to learn

            I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

            Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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