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4 Great Website Landing Pages and Why

4 Great Website Landing Pages and Why

All of the marketing and press in the world cannot help a company or entrepreneur that cannot put together a good landing page. In fact, many studies have been done that show that slight changes in the structure of a landing page can double, or even triple conversions overnight. That is a lot easier than spending hours on SEO, PR, Google Adwords, Facebook ads, and other expensive marketing tactics. The only real hard part is figuring out what those slight changes need to be.

Here are four keys to creating a successfully converting landing page and examples.

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Simplify

Companies and individuals often get so caught up in trying to explain how incredible their product or service is that they forget they have time constraints. The average user will not show up to a web page and read all of the copy and then make a well-informed decision. Many consumers give a webpage less than 10 seconds to capture their attention or their information and then they are gone.

Bills.com has a great landing page that simplifies its purpose into one question, essentially asking why they are on the site. Then Bills.com is able to direct them to the most relevant information for them and keep them long enough to start building rapport.

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Explain the benefit

Once you simplify, then you focus on explaining the benefit to your product or service in as few words as possible. If you are selling an app that can help people manage their time more effectively, you might write something along the lines of “Eliminate wasted time and double your productivity with X”. You have helped the user see what problem your service solves, helped them to see how it will be solved, and done so in just a few seconds.

Conveniently, a great example of this is Unbounce, a leader in conversion page optimization. Their homepage quickly explains the benefit and keeps the benefit explanation as close to the call to action as possible.

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CTA location

CTAs can be sometimes hard to work in. Any SEO worth their salt will explain that a webpage needs a lot of words and written content in order to show up in search engines. Companies like Google do not have a lot to go off besides words, meaning words matter quite a bit.

Many companies and especially new entrepreneurs make the mistake of writing their 2,000 word landing page and then putting the CTA at the end. After all, it makes sense to do it this way. Sell first, ask for their business at the end. That model doesn’t work when they are a click away from leaving.

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Here is a great example of a page with lots of content that is useful, but offering the CTA at the beginning for those that are ready to make a decision already. Then the top of the page offers links that can take you to other places in the page that may answer specific questions.

Design around CTA

Remember, your entire goal is to get the user to click the CTA on the page. This needs to show in your design. The first thing a user’s eyes should go to on a landing page is the CTA. They can then browse other parts of the page that they find relevant, but they always know just where and what the CTA is.

Trulia, and most real estate sites, do a great job of this. They start getting information from you as soon as they can and make it very easy to dive into the funnel and get started.

The real thing to remember with landing pages is that there is no one guaranteed strategy. That is why true marketers are constantly testing and improving their landing pages. It is usually much easier to improve conversions than it is to increase traffic quickly.

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Spencer Mecham

Marketing Manager

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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