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4 Learning Strategies Quick Learners Master But Never Told You

4 Learning Strategies Quick Learners Master But Never Told You

Learning doesn’t just stop when we leave school or university – many of us have goals and dreams that require a level of learning or perhaps just learning new skills for personal growth. Either way, our modern, fast-paced society tends to create a mindset and a need to learn something as fast as possible in order to keep up, and as a result, we often expect more progress and faster mastery of the subject in a shorter amount of time.

4 Steps To Learn Efficiently In Much Less Time

1. Get Over Your Fear of the Unknown

Many people give up quickly on their dreams because the unknown conjures up feelings of uncertainty and threat. Ambiguity brings doubtfulness [1] which creates an unstable mindset. When we think about achieving our dreams, this can be a massive goal killer.

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Many of us are more prepared to give up than face entering unclear and insecure territory because it can cause such emotional discomfort. However, learning to dispel this fear will go towards developing a more determined mindset. Making the effort to get out of your comfort zone and believe in what you’re doing will take you further much faster.

2. Discover Clarity Early On

The more clarity you have,[2] the more motivation you’ll get to achieve your goals and dreams. But don’t get too ahead of yourself as the key isn’t to get clear too far up the path. As we mentioned in the last point, the unknown is always there and we can’t clarify what we don’t yet know. However, making sure you’re clear about the next step or two will keep your brain motivated to carry on and not give up.

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Many times, not having clarity at each step will cause people to delay the next step or give up all together until motivation resurfaces, resulting in slower results overall. Break your learning down into structured chunks; firstly, plan when you aim to get each one done. Once you finish each step, be clear about what you need to do next and how you’ll best achieve it e.g. extra resources. This will streamline your forward movement.

3. Keep Your Purpose in Mind

We all have reasons as to ‘why’ we want to learn something, but we can sometimes lose sight of our ‘why’ along the process. It’s really important to keep coming back to what you’re learning and the why behind it [3], as this helps you to keep your brain motivated. When we start the learning process, there are key stages along the way that can trip us up – whether it’s demotivation or difficulties – and it’s these that slow our learning way down.

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Knowing why you want to learn something can help in elevating your focus and steadying your motivation, as well as help to connect your interests and goals.

4. Learn in Context

This is probably one of the most important steps in streamlining your learning process. Context-based learning helps your brain connect the dots more easily. A perfect example of this is learning a new language. Speaking and practising with a native speaker or going to the country and forcing yourself to speak the language will help with context.

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Whatever you are trying to learn, try to apply what you do learn to real-world scenarios. Not only does this allow you to see just how it works but increases motivation and allows it to click in the brain more easily.[4] Context-based learning also involves making sure you get consistent feedback or coaching as it not only reaffirms what you know, but points out areas of improvement and increases that essential motivation.

Using these simple steps to prepare your mindset and ultimately streamline the process, will allow your journey of learning and growing to be a less bumpy and more efficient experience.

Reference

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Jenny Marchal

A passionate writer who loves sharing about positive psychology.

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Last Updated on June 2, 2020

Easy Tasks or Difficult Tasks First? Which One is More Productive?

Easy Tasks or Difficult Tasks First? Which One is More Productive?

Procrastination is probably the biggest detriment to our productivity. Conventional wisdom dictates that the best thing you can do is make that procrastination constructive. When you don’t feel like doing one task, usually one that requires a lot of will- or brainpower, you do another, usually less labor-intensive task.

Recently, though, conventional wisdom has been challenged with something Penn State refers to as “pre-crastination.”[1] After doing a series of studies in which students pick up and carry one of two buckets, researchers theorized that many people prefer to take care of difficult tasks sooner rather than later. That theory poses the question of whether this pre-crastination or the more widely acknowledged constructive procrastination is more effective.

Here is a look at whether people should do difficult tasks early or later on to achieve maximum productivity.

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Doing Easy Tasks First

The Pros

One of the hardest parts of working is just getting started. Constructive procrastination eases this hardship, because working on easy tasks requires a smaller mental or physical commitment than if you tackled difficult tasks firsts.

If one of the foremost deterrents to your productivity is simply getting going, it makes a lot of sense to save the difficult tasks for when you’re in more of a groove.

The Cons

If you eat a frog first thing in the morning, that will probably be the worst thing you do all day. — Mark Twain

On the surface, there don’t seem to necessarily be any disadvantages to doing easy tasks first. However, in Eat That Frog, the book writeen by Brian Tracy challenges that.

Based on the above quote from Mark Twain, Eat That Frog encourages avoiding procrastination, even if that procrastination is constructive. Tracy wants you to “eat that frog,” i.e. do your difficult tasks quickly because the longer it’s on your plate, the harder it will become to do the thing you’re dreading. If you have a habit of dreading things, Eat That Frog makes a solid argument to hold off on your easy tasks until later in the day.

Doing Difficult Tasks First

The Pros

Brian Tracy postulates in Eat That Frog that if you do your difficult tasks first, your other tasks won’t seem so bad. After all, after you eat a frog, even something unappetizing will seem downright delectable.

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Tracy also recommends that, if you have to eat two frogs, you should eat the uglier one first. The metaphor is a very easy way to get your head around the new concept of pre-crastination.

If all of your tasks seem somewhat torturous to you, you might be able to ease the pain by getting rid of the ugliest “toads” as quickly as you can.

The Cons

The primary disadvantage of doing your difficult tasks first is probably that it will make it especially hard to get started on your workday.

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A lot of people aren’t exactly at their peak performance mode when they enter the office. They need to ease into the workday, maybe have a cup or two of coffee to stimulate them.

If that’s you, doing your most difficult tasks first would probably be a costly mistake. Hold off on “eating those frogs” until you have the willpower and fortitude to choke them down.

Conclusion

Should you do easy or difficult tasks first? It seems like a cop-out to say that it depends on the person, but sometimes that’s the honest answer, and that is definitely the case here.

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Hopefully this article helps inform you of what type of worker you are, offering clues to whether you fall into the constructive procrastination or pre-crastination camps. Good luck on your pursuit of maximum productivity!

More Tips for Beating Procrastination

Featured photo credit: Courtney Dirks via flickr.com

Reference

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