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Essential Editing and Proofreading Tools for Polish Academic Writing

Essential Editing and Proofreading Tools for Polish Academic Writing

Academic writing is a major part of graduate school and academic research, where standards are understandably high. This skill will have been developed over the course of your previous studies, and by now you will have some solid experience in producing good writing. However, knowing that your writing is about to be judged at a higher level and to exacting standards can be daunting, which is why having some steps to follow to ensure the quality of your essay can help anyone succeed.

At a graduate or faculty level you are dealing with complex topics and in-depth research – and once you’ve put together a solid thesis with plenty of supporting evidence, you may feel like you’ve done all that’s required of you. However, one of the main areas that everyone struggles with is polishing their writing. What happens when you have amazing content supported by reliable references, but you still aren’t getting high marks, or being recognised as an authority in your field?

It could be that your actual writing is letting you down. Editing and proofreading are skills that don’t always come as easily as researching your material. A polished essay is essential to gain high marks.

Don’t worry. Help is available. Below is a list of the top resources available online now right now to help you polish your writing and hit those high grades.

1. Assignment Help

Assignment help

    One of the most important parts of the editing process is ensuring that you haven’t accidentally plagiarised a source you have used. A huge element of any Master’s degree is the thesis, and this is meant to be a completely original topic, and your own original ideas. While you may use many quotes, any signs that this isn’t entirely your own work could result in an outright fail, and your graduate school career is over. Your professor will likely check your work for plagiarism, so being caught out, even for an accident, is possible. Faculty writing is equally scrutinised before publication to prevent any embarrassment, copyright infringements, or claims of stolen intellectual property. This site runs a full plagiarism check to ensure that nothing will raise red flags for your professor, or editors of academic journals who will check the work they publish.

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    The site is particularly useful as it also has online study tools and grammar guides to help you with your essay. It has a word count function to double check that your essay hits its word count, and to illustrate how many words you need to add or cut through the editing process.

    2. Hemingwayapp

    Hemingway

      Graduate students and faculty writers deal with ideas and concepts that will be long, complex, and hard to explain. However, no matter what your topic is, your sentences should not be long, complicated, and hard to read. Your essay should be easy to read and understand. The Hemingway App is a tool that focuses on structure. Could you break your sentences down to make them more readable? Remove redundant language? This app has the answers.

      3. Prowritingaid

      ProwritingAid

        As a Master’s thesis can easily be over 20,000 words long, copying and pasting can be a challenge. Faculty writing can be even longer, depending on the topic, and as some sites have a limit on the words they can analyse, you could end up in the tedious process of analysing chunks of your work at a time. You could also end up sitting waiting forever while the pasted content is checked. This site is grad-student and faculty user friendly, as it allows you to submit your essay in its current format rather than having to copy and paste it in. It checks readability and grammar, highlighting bad word choices and repetitive points and words.

        4. Essayroo

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        Essayroo

          This service will give you a professional proofread ensuring that your spelling, punctuation and grammar are all on point. Privacy and security is guaranteed, so none of your research is at risk of theft, plus their proof readers all hold a master’s or PhD in their fields. This means your work is being reviewed by a peer, who is qualified to review writing at this high level, and who fully understands the subject, and the expected tone and content.

          5. The art of editing

          Art of Editing

            This site is managed by the University of Leicester so you know it offers sound advice. This page offers a full guide to editing with useful advice on what to do and what not to do. As this is run by an academic institution, it lends itself well to both graduate students – who can see what their professors want – and also for faculty writers, who don’t want to make a faux pas before their peers.

            6. Readability-score

            Readability Score

              This site gives your prose a score based on how readable it is. The higher the score the better the flow. It offers hints and advice on what to change to improve your score. It is important to bear in mind here that the people who will be reading graduate students’ theses or academic journals will generally have a very high reading level, and so you shouldn’t aim to overly simplify your work.

              7. Boomessays

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              Boomessays

                This service will do the editing for you. As it is aimed specifically at essays, the editors behind the website understand the components needed to make a good essay. You can even input the academic level you are working at to ensure it isn’t over simplified. As Master’s and Doctoral level work is covered, you can be sure that the structure, language, and tone of your essay will be entirely appropriate.

                8. Paperrater

                Paperrater

                  This service checks grammar and suggests changes to improve the flow of your work. It also runs a plagiarism check to ensure that you haven’t accidentally plagiarised a source. Referencing documents as lengthy as faculty writing for academic journals and Master’s theses can easily contain a small mistake in a quote, or a section too similar to someone else’s work. Using this tool avoids losing credibility when your paper is checked after submission.

                  9. Tips for Hiring an Outside Editor

                  Tips on hiring an outside editor

                    This site offers some advice on what to do if you want to hire an outside editor. It details some of the questions you should ask and allows you to negotiate with editors. This is extremely helpful for graduate students who have unresponsive supervisors, or who want a second opinion, or for faculty writers exploring a topic that nobody else at the university is an expert on. It is natural to feel more comfortable sharing your work with an outsider, so this may encourage more back and forth and better drafts, which can only be a good thing.

                    10. Ukwritings

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                    ukwritings

                      This is another site offering proofreading services that are carried out by qualified proof readers, and can be tailored to a Master’s or Doctoral level. In no way would your academic writing be dumbed down by using this service.

                      11. Easy Wordcount

                      EasyWordCount

                        When you have finished the editing process, you can use this site to ensure that your completed essay still hits the word count. No one wants to risk losing vital marks on their graduate school thesis by being too far under or over a word count – and no faculty writer wants to risk publication for the same reason either!

                        By using one or more of these tools, you are giving yourself a much better chance of success when it comes to writing your academic essays. These services can all be tailored to specifically meet the needs of the highest levels of academic writing, and the professionals involved are eminently qualified to review the work. They are all quick and easy to use and their user friendly nature takes the pain out of the editing and proofreading process.

                        And while editing any document is a pain, it is by far preferable to being a faculty writer with discredited research, or a graduate student accused of plagiarism. It is worth using these tools to ensure there will be no issues with your academic writing. It’s also worth the confidence you get from knowing you have produced the highest quality essay possible, as accepting editing help just contributes to making your content and ideas clearer and stronger.

                        Featured photo credit: Wokandapix via pixabay.com

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                        Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                        The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                        The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                        No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                        Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                        Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                        A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                        Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                        In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                        From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                        A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                        For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                        This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                        The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                        That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                        Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                        The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                        Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                        But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                        The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                        The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                        A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                        For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                        But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                        If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                        For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                        These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                        For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                        How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                        Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                        Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                        Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                        My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                        Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                        I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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                        Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                        Reference

                        [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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