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If You Think Eating Dairy Products Can Prevent Osteoarthritis, You Need To Read This

If You Think Eating Dairy Products Can Prevent Osteoarthritis, You Need To Read This

If you’re young, you probably think osteoarthritis is a condition that affects the elderly. If you are middle-aged you might think that it is something inevitable that affects most people as they get older. You may think that drinking milk and eating dairy products can prevent developing osteoarthritis later in life.

Common misconceptions about Osteoarthritis

Actually, most of us are wrong when it comes to preconceptions about this condition. Firstly, we have to act preventatively earlier in life so as not to suffer from it later in life. Secondly, not all elderly people suffer from it, as there are lifestyle choices that can help prevent osteoarthritis. Finally, in order to prevent the condition, there is more to it than just taking enough calcium rich food.

Osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease is the most common form of arthritis characterized by bony sclerosis and joint space narrowing. More commonly affecting women, osteoarthritis causes symptoms such as pain, swelling and stiffness in the bones. The risk of developing the condition increases with age. Some factors causing the condition include genetic predisposition, excess body mass, joint injury, knee pain, structural malalignment, muscle weakness, estrogen deficiency.

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Why calcium alone isn’t enough

Most common advice for the prevention and treatment of the condition is sufficient calcium intake through dairy products. Although calcium does help in preserving the bone structure, the overemphasis on calcium is more of an advertising strategy than the ultimate solution to any health condition affecting bones. Calcium alone isn’t enough, since additional minerals and vitamins are required in order for balanced calcium supply. One such mineral is magnesium.

A 2009 study[1] shows that magnesium intake has significant influence on greater bone mineral density in both men and women. Another study[2] gives more important role to magnesium than calcium when it comes to preserving the bone density. The complementary relationship between calcium and magnesium stems from the fact that in order for calcium to be absorbed, vitamin D has to be in active form, which again requires magnesium.[3] Therefore, magnesium intake is essential in the proper calcium metabolism and maintaining the bone structure.

Another way magnesium helps to prevent osteoarthritis, kidney stones and heart attack is by stimulating the production of calcitonin,[4]a hormone that maintains the structure of bones. Calcitonin helps in preserving bone structure by separating calcium from blood and soft tissue and bringing it back to the bone.

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This is what happens when calcium is taken alone

Taking calcium rich food or supplementation alone can actually bring more harm than good. Without enough magnesium to aid the process, our bodies absorb less than half of the calcium we consume. Taking too much calcium supplements can lead to a process of calcification in the artery walls, kidneys and muscles. The calcification happens when calcium accumulates in soft tissues and calcifies (hardens).

When and how to take preventative measures

Taking preventative measures against osteoarthritis means starting as early as 20s to 40s. This is especially important for female population as they are more susceptible to the condition. If we want to preserve proper bone density and structure and avoid the risk of developing osteoarthritis later in life, certain modifications in our diet plan must be made.

As opposed to the traditional suggested calcium to magnesium ratio 2:1 that leads to increased calcium intake, which causes high calcification and various health problems, our diet needs to be rich in magnesium for the proper calcium absorption. In addition to the magnesium rich diet, strength training exercises are a great way to preserve bone density.

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What to eat

Whole grains, nuts, green leafy vegetables, and seeds.

What to avoid

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Refined sugar, white flour, fats, coffee, and alcohol.

Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com/ via pixabay.com

Reference

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19968914?dopt=Abstract
[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2352244
[3] http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/2787312
[4] http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/7669510

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

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