Advertising

5 Ways to Improve Your Cell Phone Connection

Advertising
5 Ways to Improve Your Cell Phone Connection

After shelling out hundreds of dollars for the latest and greatest cell phone, there’s nothing more frustrating than not having an adequate signal to use all the features of the phone. What good are photos and videos if you can’t share them? An app is worthless if your phone cannot find and maintain a strong signal with the tower.

Common signs of poor signal strength include, poor call quality, dropped calls, spotty service, failed emails or text messages, and slow internet service. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to enhance the quality of your cell phone connection. Read on!

Advertising

1. Use a Wi-Fi signal instead.

You can potentially get even more use out of your Wi-Fi signal. UMA or Unlicensed Mobile Access allows supported phones to make calls via the internet. All the major carriers support UMA to varying degrees with a suitable cell phone. Use every advantage you can get to enhance your cell phone signal.

2. Keep your phone charged.

When your battery is nearly drained, it’s more challenging for your phone to make a connection and to maintain it. Take every opportunity to plug in your cell phone and recharge the battery. A portable battery charger can be a great investment. Avoid using your battery more than necessary.

Advertising

  • Turn off Bluetooth if you’re not using it.
  • Avoid extreme temperatures.
  • Avoid keeping the screen brighter than necessary.
  • Turn off any push notifications.
  • Close apps that work in the background.

3. Avoid blocking your cell phone’s antenna.

Those that remember the old days of cell phones will remember the presence of external antennas. At one time, the antenna was attached to your automobile’s rear windshield. Then the antenna was sticking out of the phone itself. Modern phones still have antenna, only now they’re inside the phone.

It’s possible for your hand to interfere with the antenna on your cell phone if you’re holding it just the right way. Your phone has the best reception when it’s in a vertical position. Using your phone in a landscape position tends to be worse.

Advertising

4. Find the closest cell phone tower.

It only makes sense that the closer your phone is to the tower, the better the reception will be. In some areas cell towers could be far apart, which is why an entire cell tower leasing industry exists. Fortunately, it isn’t necessary to drive around looking for cell phone towers. There are websites and apps that will tell you exactly where your cell phone towers are located.

Cellreception.com can show you the actual location of the cell towers for each of the four primary carriers – Verizon, Sprint, AT&T and T-Mobile. Just enter your zip code or city. Opensignal.com displays the signal strength for each of the four carriers on a map of your area. Opensignal is also available as an app for iPhone and Android. Two other popular apps for determining signal strength are Akvelon’s Signal Finder and RootMetrics’ Cell Phone Coverage Map. Both are available for iPhone and Android.

Advertising

5. Avoid the crowds.

When too many people get together in a single location, the load on the cell phone tower can be too much for your phone to make a reliable connection. Any crowded public event can be a problem; for example, sports events, festivals, amusement parks, and concerts. Add the fact that many of those people are taking pictures and recording videos that they want to share with the world, and it doesn’t take long to create a problem. A quick trip away from the crowds can make a big difference in your cell reception. You already have the tools to find the nearest cell phone tower. It might be closer than you think!

Those tips may be a great help to improve your cell phone connection. Ensure that you’re getting the quality of service that you expect. Reliable 3G and 4G LTE signals are necessary to stay connected in today’s world. A few simple tips can make all the difference. Don’t allow your expensive cell phone to be little more than a fancy calculator.

Advertising

More by this author

3 Tips to Protect Your Home From Natural Disasters 5 Misconceptions About Credit Scores 5 Simple Ways to Increase Your Walk-In Traffic 3 Signs That You Are Addicted To Sports Betting 5 Small Business Decisions Usually Made Too Late

Trending in Technology

1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

Advertising
How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

    Advertising

    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

    Advertising

    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

    Advertising

    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

    Advertising

    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

    Read Next