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3 Things You Didn’t Know Can Cause Poor Blood Circulation

3 Things You Didn’t Know Can Cause Poor Blood Circulation

Young people are generally unaware that poor blood circulation sets up a dangerous trap health-wise because its symptoms are not obvious while they’re young.

When symptoms are discovered, generally, when they’re older, it’s too late to find remedies. Indeed, prevention is paramount to address this issue. Following are some of the less known causes of poor blood circulation:

Three Lifestyle Causes of Poor Circulation

1. Binge Drinking

Studies have shown that drinking a glass of alcohol (distilled spirits, wine, or beer) a day can help the heart function better. It also helps maintain balance and the right proportions of fat in the blood and helps in lowering chances of developing blood clots and blocked arteries.

However, science also declares more than two drinks of alcohol a day can harm the heart. How? Large amounts of alcohol can affect how the heart works. If the heart isn’t pumping blood throughout the body effectively, other organs may suffer from lack of oxygen or nutrients. If the person drinking has clogged blood vessels, the heart has to work even harder.

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Studies on middle-aged and older people resulted in finding links between binge drinking and a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases like stroke, sudden cardiac death, and heart attack. Binge drinking may also lead to hardened arteries which increased the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Obviously, binge drinking should be avoided at all cost in order to have a healthy blood circulation. One way to avoid it is to limit the time you spend with your gang who’s into binge drinking. You can also hang a huge poster illustrating the dangers of drinking too much alcohol. Locate it somewhere you can always see it; on the fridge, your room ceiling, or your bathroom mirror. This way, every single day, upon waking up you’ll be reminded about the dangers of binge drinking.

2. Sitting For Too Long, Especially With Bad Posture

Sitting can kill!

While a brief period of sitting here and there is natural, long periods of sitting day-in and day-out can seriously impact your health and shorten your life. Excessive sitting is one of the causes of poor circulation.

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The Mind Unleashed has a notable description of prolonged sitting’s negative effects:

Organ Damage

  • The Heart – In a sitting position, blood flow slows down and muscles don’t burn enough fat, which permits fatty acids to clog in the heart much faster.
  • The Pancreas – The body’s ability to properly respond to insulin is badly affected by just one day of prolonged sitting. This leads the pancreas to produce more insulin, and this cause diabetes.
  • Colon Cancer – Excessive sitting may increase your risk of colon, breast, and endometrial cancers. It could be because of excess insulin production, which encourages cell growth.

How do you avoid sitting for too long? Adding more non-exercise movement into your daily routine makes a difference. If you set a goal of around 7,000 to 10,000 steps a day (just over three to five miles) it can go a long way toward more movement and less sitting.

For example, you can walk across the hall to talk to an office mate instead of shooting him an email, instead of the elevator, take the stairs, or park your car away from where your cubicle is.

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3. High Intake Of Sodium

A high intake of sodium is a more common cause of poor circulation.

Sodium is a mineral and electrolyte that’s crucial for your body to function well. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around 90% of sodium you get comes from salt. Sodium assists in controlling blood volume and blood pressure. However, your circulatory health may suffer if you get too much of it.

A high sodium diet is linked to hypertension. According to the CDC, if sodium rises, blood pressure rises too. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommends you limit salt intake to less than 2,300 milligrams/day.

You must not consume 1,500 milligrams daily if you’re 51 years old or older, African-American, or have health conditions like HB pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. Processed foods and restaurant foods are full of salt. Don’t eat these foods and you’ll be able to avoid the intake of salt.

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So to sum up – avoid binge drinking, sitting for too long and remember to cut down the intake of salt in your diet to improve your blood circulation. A little bit of exercise can go a long way to get your circulation up and running.

Featured photo credit: www.winerist.com via winerist.com

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Anthony Dejolde

TV/Radio personality who educates his audience on entrepreneurship, productivity, and leadership.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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