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5 Drinks You Don’t Know Can Smooth Your Digestion A Lot

5 Drinks You Don’t Know Can Smooth Your Digestion A Lot

Almost all of us have, at one time or another, suffered from digestive problems. These may range from heartburn to diarrhea and indigestion to constipation. For many people, constipation and its dreaded bloated and full feeling are the worst.

One of the best way to avoid constipation is by eating a well-balanced diet that includes fiber and lots of liquids. But maybe you don’t have enough time in your busy day to eat the required servings of fruits and veggies. Maybe you forgot to drink enough water all week. Maybe you just want to buy a fast-acting laxative and be done with it.

But wait! Before you run to the pharmacy for a laxative, which could make the situation worse, try one of the following drinks. Don’t worry! You can easily prepare these or buy them already prepared. Just serve yourself, have a drink at the office, and reap the benefits while you work.

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1. Coffee or Tea

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    Image source

    Do you love the smell of coffee brewing? Do you have to have a cup in the morning to wake up? Or are you more of a tea person? It doesn’t matter, the caffeine in both drinks can help relieve your constipation. Caffeine is a natural digestive stimulant and diuretic. According to one study, it triggers contractions in your colon which help to move hardened waste through the duct.

    Warning: Caffeine may lead to diarrhea in some people. Too much caffeine may result in dehydration which could make constipation worse.

    2. Honey

    honey
      Image by Evren Gunturkun

      Not only is this sweet golden liquid perfect for a cup of tea or bowl of oatmeal, but it can also relieve constipation. The best way to benefit from its effects is by mixing a spoonful with a cup of warm water and drinking it about 30 minutes before eating. Some people claim a squirt of lemon juice increases its effectiveness. Research suggests that honey may be a laxative in some people due to the body’s inability to absorb all of its fructose.

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      Warning: Honey is a natural sugar and should be limited to 1 teaspoon a day, especially for people with diabetes as its consumption can result in increased blood sugar levels.

      3. Fat-Free Milk

      Drinking fat-free milk is another constipation-relieving option. While some research indicates that full fat milk may actually result in constipation, another study determined that fat-free milk has the opposite effect. Consuming fat-free milk increases two peptide hormones which work to stimulate the digestive tract.

      Warning: People with lactose intolerance should try one of the other constipation remedies on the list to avoid diarrhea.

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      4. Tomato Juice

      tomato-juice
        Image source

        Since a lack of dietary fiber is the leading cause of constipation, it’s important to increase fiber consumption. Try drinking tomato juice; it has one of the highest amounts of fiber when compared to any other fruit juice.

        5. Ginger

        ginger-1714196_1280
          Image source

          Ginger acts as a natural laxative and can stimulate bowel activity. Drinking ginger tea is the best way to benefit from its effects. Add about 2 teaspoons of ginger for every cup of hot water and have a cup 2 or 3 times daily.

          Warning: Ginger may affect the body’s response to medicine for diabetes and may adversely interact with blood-thinning medications as well. Consult a doctor before consume.

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          Additional Considerations

          These 5 drinks are only short-term recommendations. The best way to prevent and treat constipation is via diet, liquid intake, and exercise. Make sure to get the recommended daily serving of fiber: between 30 and 35 grams. Fiber intake needs to be done with increased liquid intake. Fiber is important because it dissolves in water and helps soften the body’s solid waste. When stool is soft, it is easier to pass which helps us avoid constipation. Exercise is also important because it helps to stimulate the digestive system.

          Featured photo credit: freepik via freepik.com

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          Amber Pariona

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          8 Things to Watch for If You’re Considering Being Vegetarian

          8 Things to Watch for If You’re Considering Being Vegetarian

          Vegetarianism has been around for a long time, finding favor with many people, including Pythagoras clear back around 580 B.C. It’s been presented as one of the most healthy diets around, including being touted by the Egyptians to the point of abstaining from meat and animal clothing due to karmic beliefs. The vegetarian society (vegsoc.org) defines vegetarianism as:

          “Someone who lives on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with, or without, the use of dairy products and eggs. A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish* or by-products of slaughter.”

          While it’s pretty obvious that there are multiple benefits to following a vegetarian diet, it’s always good to be informed about the cons of this dietary choice as well.

          Outlined below are several things you might want to be aware of before you say good-bye to meat forever. Whether you are a current vegetarian, or contemplating making a shift, keep in mind these 8 things to keep yourself healthy.

          1. You could suffer from B12 vitamin deficiency

          The B vitamins are especially important for stress management, adrenal health, and brain function. Vegetarians in particularly are at risk for B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 is attached to the protein in animal products and without enough B12 you can suffer from depression, fatigue, and an inability to concentrate.

          Due to its attachment to animal proteins, B12 is the hardest for vegetarians to obtain when they don’t eat dairy or eggs in their diet. This essential little vitamin can be found in some algae and has been added to some yeast, but research doesn’t currently provide enough information to say whether or not these forms of B12 are of good quality and can provide adequate supplementation.

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          The body is unable to make this vitamin, meaning it has to be taken in through food or supplementation. Essential for making red blood cells, DNA, nerves and various other function in the body, a Harvard Health Medical report in January of 2013 found symptoms of a B12 deficiency can present in sneaky ways including depression, paranoia, delusion, and loss of taste and smell.

          2.  You could suffer from higher states of anxiety/depression, lower sense of well-being

          According to a CBS Atlanta report, vegetarians suffered from a higher rate of anxiety and depression than their counterparts. Read the full report here. Depression and/or anxiety can be a result of many possible deficiencies including essential vitamins and amino acids you can find only in meat products, including Omega-3s from wild caught salmon.

          Without the correct supplementation and proper understanding of diet, including the importance of micro and macro nutrients, depression and anxiety can become a serious problem, bringing down the overall health and well-being of vegetarians.

          Even though reports on health and lifestyle show vegetarians have a lower BMI and lower consumption of alcohol and drugs, it also shows they suffer from more chronic illnesses and more visits to the doctor than their meat eating counterparts.

          3. You could suffer from excess weight

          When you go vegetarian it opens up a lot of food, but just because there isn’t any meat in front of you, it doesn’t mean it’s necessary healthy. Though pizza and beer technically fall under the vegetarian diet, it’s not a healthy choice for your waist line.

          Just because being a vegetarian is associated with a healthier lifestyle in many cases, doesn’t mean it’s always true. Making bread and pasta your staples and not understanding where your protein sources should be coming from, can pack on body fat, which increases your chances of health issues such as diabetes and chronic inflammation.

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          If the choice to go vegetarian happens on a whim without the proper understanding of food control, portion, and nutritionally dense alternatives you can find yourself reaching for vegetarian foods, which could cause serious problems down the road. Nuts are a good example, but just because something is touted as healthy, it doesn’t mean, your should eat it in excess.

          Eating too many calories in fat will still cause you to gain weight. Eating too many calories in carbs will cause you to gain weight. Eating too many calories in protein will cause you to gain weight. See a pattern here? Not to mention you’ll miss out on important nutrients the body needs by over-eating in one area and under-eating in another. Re-read number 2.

          4. You could have a higher risk of heart disease

          Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables should be a goal we all strive for, but when you cut out meat, you also cut out what is known as complete protein, which you find in animal by-products. Complete means more than just the essential amino acids, it means those amino acids contain dietary sulfur. Without enough dietary sulfur, which is found almost exclusively in fish and pasture feed grass beef, the body will struggle with the biological activities of both protein and enzymes.

          The effects cascade downward, effecting bones, joints, tissues, and even metabolic issues. In short, a low intake of sulfur associated with a vegetarian diet can result in high blood levels of homocysteine, which may lead to blood clots in your arteries, blood clots raise your risk of stroke and heart attack. To read the full report click here.

          5. You could suffer from low cholesterol

          I know, at first you’re thinking, wait, low cholesterol is a good thing. Yes, it is, when it’s LDL cholesterol, which you get from eating an unhealthy diet, but low HDL (good cholesterol) can cause serious health issues. HDL, according to the mayo clinic, is in every cell in our body and can help fend off heart disease, not enough of it though, and too much LDL can go the other way, will be building up plaque in the arteries and leading to heart disease.

          Cholesterol, the good kind, is actually vitally important to the making of every steroid hormone in the body! There are six, and without cholesterol the body is unable to convert hormones, and it can cause damage in the endocrine system.

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          A vegetarian without a balanced diet, meaning enough protein, enough veggies, and enough good fats, could disrupt his or her adrenals, which are directly connected to the endocrine system and the body’s ability to make and synthesize the hormones your body needs. The six major hormones in the body help do everything from metabolizing carbohydrates, to the electrolyte balance, to making sure if you’re a woman you can carry a healthy baby through pregnancy.

          6. You could suffer from lower bone density and osteoporosis.

          Osteoporosis, the disease where the bones get thinner, weaker, and fractures become a high risk with day to day movements. It’s often associated with the older generation, but your risk for osteoporosis increases with a lower bone density. Bone density can be directly related to diet and lifestyle, along with many other factors.

          When it comes to eating a vegetarian diet it’s possible to miss getting enough of the right nutrients, causing the bones to begin to break down. If your vegetarian diet isn’t balanced and providing you with the correct nutrients and the means to absorb the correct nutrients, your body could begin to break down.

          Recently, Professor Tuan Nguyen of Sydney’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research led a review of both Australian and Vietnamese research around the bone density of vegetarian versus their meat eating counterparts. Helping Professor Nguyen was Dr. Ho-Pham Thuc Lan from Pham Ngoc Thac University of Medicine in Vietnam. The review was designed to sort though years of research surrounded by discrepancies and inadequate clinical data.

          At the end of the review, with vegetarianism rising to around 5% of the populace in the western continents, and with wide spread osteoporosis reports – 2 million in Australia and closer to 54 million in America – the decrease in bone density of vegetarians is a serious issue which needs to be addressed, if you’ve cut meat and animal by-products out of your life.

          7. You could be at a higher risk for colorectal cancer

          Cancer seems to be running rampant through America, and it’s within everyone’s best interest to do all they can to keep their body healthy and happy to prevent cancer from finding a place to grow. In most studies it’s been found vegetarians are at lower risk for cancer, but a European Oxford study with over 63 thousand men and women in the United Kingdom found the risk for colorectal cancer higher in vegetarians than in meat-eaters.

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          Extra care needs to be taken when establishing a diet to ensure the body is receiving and able to up take all the important nutritional benefits and requirements from food.

          8. You could end up eating more processed food

          Depending on how deep you choose to go as a vegetarian, it could create the need to substitute a lot of food and recipe ingredients in your diet, but what happens when you cut out meat, eggs, and dairy and your recipe calls for meat, eggs, and/or dairy? You have to end up using a “healthy” vegetarian alternative which include stabilizers, thickeners, and various other ingredients you can’t pronounce.

          Lauren from Empowered Substance puts it into a great perspective with her comparison of Earth Balance, a vegetarian approved butter replacement compared to butter. She points out the ingredients in Earth Balance consist of: Palm fruit oil, canola oil, safflower oil, flax oil, olive oil, salt, natural flavor, pea protein, sunflower lecithin, lactic acid, annatto color. Meanwhile, the ingredient list in butter, is much shorter. It’s butter.

          That’s only one example. To appeal to the vegetarian lifestyle food manufacturers have found alternatives which fall under vegetarian, but aren’t necessarily healthy for you. Consider baked goods, which though vegetarian can be filled with more sugars and binders than regular baked goods with diary products. It’s the same with vegetarian items like mac and cheese, without using real cheese you may just be getting oil and thickeners, without even the smallest amount of nutritional value.

          The reality is, most vegetarian substitutes contain the same junky alternatives which even meat eaters should be avoiding to remain happy and healthy.

          On one final note, whichever lifestyle you choose to work with, remember anything in excess – including protein and animal by products – isn’t healthy for the body. It takes a wide spectrum of food and nutrients to keep the beautiful body you travel around in all day running in prime condition.

           

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