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Ask These 3 Questions Daily To Be More Productive and Do Work That Matters

Ask These 3 Questions Daily To Be More Productive and Do Work That Matters

“The quality of your life is determined by the quality of your questions” – Dr. John Demartini

The questions we ask ourselves determines what we focus on. If you want to produce better results in your life and business, it starts with asking yourself better questions.

High performers and elite entrepreneurs make it a daily habit of asking empowering questions that allow them to be fully present in the moment, do their best work, and focus on what matters most.

In this article, you’ll learn 3 questions to ask yourself daily to become more productive, feel fulfilled, and make a greater impact.

Before we dive in, it’s important to state what may be obvious to some. These questions aren’t a magic pill that will transform your life just by asking them. They must be followed up with consistent, purposeful action.

Each one of them has been a game-changer for me, and I’m confident they will be extremely valuable and helpful for you as well. Let’s dive in…

1. How can I serve today?

Research has shown the key to increasing productivity, work satisfaction and fulfillment is doing meaningful work.

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When we attach what we do to a greater why – by finding meaning in what we do and doing work that matters – we show up consistently and require less external motivation and willpower to perform at our best.

Making it a daily habit of asking yourself the question “How can I serve today?” will help you focus on what matters most.

You’ll develop the mindset of a servant leader and be open to new opportunities to add value to the people around you, and solve bigger and better problems in the marketplace. This not only increases your impact but also your income. This is crucial for entrepreneurs to understand because as Jim Rohn said

“You don’t get paid by the hour, you get paid for the value you bring to the hour”

Another benefit is the fulfilling feeling you get knowing you’re contributing to something greater than yourself. This is one of the biggest motivators of successful entrepreneurs.

Doing meaningful work isn’t about ‘gaming the system’ or seeing how you can make the most money while providing the least amount of value. It’s about viewing the people you serve as real people – who have real dreams, desires, fears and frustrations. And then falling in love with the process of creating value, and doing work that makes a meaningful difference in their lives.

How can you serve today? How can you make an impact on someone’s life today?

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Do it.

2. What’s the one thing I can do today that will lead to meaningful progress towards my goal?

What’s your one thing? This is the activity that if you got done today, would make the biggest impact on bridging the gap from where you are right now, to where you ultimately want to be.

The most productive and high performing entrepreneurs know what this is before they sit down to do work.

What I personally do is plan out my day – including writing out my 3 tasks and my most important task – the night before.

Doing this allows you to start your day with the clarity of knowing exactly what needs to get done.

It’s not enough to just know what this one thing is, though. You have to design your day and create systems that ensure you get it done while in your most creative and productive state.

For me, this means getting my most important task done first thing in the morning right after doing my morning routine, which includes things like working out, journaling, box breathing, visualization, and reading for 15-30 minutes.

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All these activities help prime my brain to be in the most focused, creative and productive state possible when it’s time to do work.

Figure out what works best for you. Make it a habit of executing on your one thing before anything else. This way you don’t use up your willpower and most productive hours on smaller, less important tasks.

3. What are my 3 wins for the day, and 3 things I can do to make tomorrow even better?

Recently I’ve made it a habit of opening my journal every evening and creating two sections: “Wins” and “Feedback”

Under “wins” I write down my 3 wins for the day, and under “feedback” I write 3 things I can do to make tomorrow even better. This is something I now look forward to doing every evening.

The ability to condition yourself to acknowledge your small wins will boost your confidence, creates momentum and inspires more purposeful action.

Giving yourself feedback at the end of each day is also powerful because it provides you with the one thing we need if we want to make any significant improvements in our lives – awareness.

If you notice for 3 days in a row under “feedback” you write: “spend less time on social media” or “get more sleep so I’m not so tired in the AM”, you’ll start to become aware that this is a recurring issue, and can create a plan of action to change it.

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This isn’t about you beating yourself up. Look at it as coaching yourself, training your “awareness muscle”, and setting yourself up to master your day tomorrow.

It’s your turn…

I’m not sure who originally said this, but a quote that has stuck with me is “Nothing changes if nothing changes.”

You are one powerful question away from transforming your life and business.

I hope this article has inspired and provided you with at least one takeaway you can immediately implement and see results with.

To recap… Focus on serving others, take action on your “one thing”, celebrate your small wins, and create the space to get feedback.

It’s time to take action.

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    Last Updated on September 20, 2018

    How to Memorize More and Faster Than Other People

    How to Memorize More and Faster Than Other People

    People like to joke that the only thing you really “learn” in school is how to memorize. As it turns out, that’s not even the case for most of us. If you go around the room and ask a handful of people how to memorize things quickly and how to remember things, most of them will probably tell you repetition.

    That is so far from the truth, it’s running for office. If you want to memorize something quickly and thoroughly, repetition won’t cut it; however, recalling something will. The problem is that recalling something requires learning and we all learn in different ways.

    So how to memorize more and faster than others?

    In this article, you will learn how to master the art of recalling so that you can start memorizing a ton of data in a short amount of time.

    Before you start, know your learning style

    Before we start, you need to establish something: are you an auditory, visual, or experiential learner?

    If you’re an auditory learner, then the most effective way for you to grasp information is by hearing it. As you can imagine, visual learners favor seeing something in order to learn it. Experiential learning types are more akin to learning from events and experiences (or, doing something with the material).

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    Try out this quick quiz to find out your learning style.

    Most of us are a combination of at least two of these categories but I will denote which step is most favorable to your most agreeable learning style so that you can start to memorize things quickly and efficiently.

    Step 1: Preparation

    To optimize your memorization session, pay close attention to which environment you choose. For most people, this means choosing an area with few distractions, though some people do thrive off of learning in public areas. Figure out what is most conducive to your learning so that you can get started.

    Next, start drinking some tea. I could link you to mounds of scientific studies that confirm green tea as a natural catalyst for improving memory. Mechanically speaking, our ability to recall information comes down to the strength between neurons in our mind, which are connected by synapses. The more you exercise the synapse (repetition), the stronger it is, resulting in the ability to memorize.

    As we get older, toxic chemicals will damage our neurons and synapses, leading to memory loss and even Alzheimer’s. Green tea contains compounds, however, that block this toxicity and keep your brain cells working properly a lot longer.

    Step 2: Record what you’re memorizing

    This is especially useful if you’re trying to memorize information from a lecture. Use a tape recorder to track all of the acquired facts being spoken and listen to it.

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    If you’re trying to memorize a speech, record yourself reading the speech aloud and listen to yourself speaking. Obviously, this is most helpful for auditory learners, but it’s also handy because it ensures that you’re getting more context from a lecture that will help you learn the information faster.

    Step 3: Write everything down

    Before you start trying to recall everything from memory, write and re-write the information. This will help you become more familiar with what you’re trying to memorize.

    Doing this while listening to your tape recorder can also help you retain a lot of the data. This is most useful for experienced learners.

    Step 4: Section your notes

    Now that you have everything written down in one set of notes, separate them into sections. This is ideal for visual learners, especially if you use color coding to differentiate between subjects.

    This will help you break everything down and start compartmentalizing the information being recorded in your brain.

    Step 5: Apply repetition to cumulative memorization

    For each line of text, repeat it a few times and try to recall it without looking. As you memorize each set of text, be cumulative by adding the new information to what you’ve just learned. This will keep everything within your short-term memory from fading.

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    Keep doing this until you have memorized that section and you are able to recall the entire thing. Do not move on to another section until you have memorized that one completely. This is mostly visual learning but if you are speaking aloud, then you are also applying auditory.

    Step 6: Write it down from memory

    Now that you can recall entire sections, write everything down from memory. This will reinforce everything you just have just learned by applying it experientially.

    Step 7: Teach it to someone (or yourself)

    The most effective method for me when I was in school was to teach the information to someone else. You can do this in a variety of ways. You can lecture the knowledge to someone sitting right in front of you (or the mirror, if you can’t convince anyone to sit through it) and explain everything extemporaneously.

    If what you’ve learned needs to be recited verbatim, then do this in front of someone as well in order to get a feel for what it will be like to recite the text to the intended audience.

    My favorite method for this is creating tests for other people. Take the information and predict what questions will come out of them. Use multiple choice, matching and so on to present the data in test format and see how someone else does.

    All of this is experiential learning since you are actually practicing and manipulating the concepts you’ve learned.

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    Step 8: Listen to the recordings continuously

    While doing unrelated tasks like laundry or driving, go over the information again by listening to your tape recordings. This is certainly auditory learning but it will still supplement everything you’ve shoved into your short-term memory.

    Step 9: Take a break

    Finally, let your mind breathe. Go for a short time without thinking about what you just learned and come back to it later on.

    You’ll find out what you really know and this will help you focus on the sections you might be weakest at.

    Try these steps now and you will find remembering things a lot easier and you’ll memorize more stuff than a lot of other people!

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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