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10 Incredible Ways To Reuse Everyday Waste

10 Incredible Ways To Reuse Everyday Waste

It’s embarrassing how much we discard in a day. So much, that I’ve had it up to here with throwing out so much – just because we’re a nation of consumers and discarders.

Looking to save the environment and live a healthier life, I looked online to educate myself about reusing everyday household items.

Interestingly I find that, industries and manufacturing units have also opted the green way – refurbishing & reutilizing almost 90% of the original material. That is going to save cost and our non-renewable sources. Isn’t that good?

Here are a few life “hacks” you can start using today at home.

1. Dish Soap Bottles

You’ve probably heard of this one before, but it’s so benefitting to saving the environment (and your fridge) that it bares repeating:

Using old dish soap bottles (thoroughly cleaned out) to sore ounces of pancake batter. Yum yum! Or, if you’re not in the pancake-breakfast mood, you can refill the bottle with plain old-fashioned, nutritious water for all your gardening needs.

2. Share Leftovers

If you’re like me, the idea of leftovers is repulsive – there’s nothing notoriously wrong with leftovers, of course. Except the name, leftovers; makes me think of a lion who can’t devour an entire gazelle and it sits there for days on end, collecting flies, mosquitos, and thousands of diseases and bacteria.

It makes sense to give leftovers to neighbours – especially if your neighbours are your family. My aunts live next to me and across the street and I made a habit of sharing my leftovers with them. Because we live so close to each other, I just pick up the Tupperware/containers the next day. No food wasted.

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3. T-Shirts

A lot of my shirts and t-shirts have holes in them. Although I still love them, a part of growing as a human includes getting rid of old things that have passed their expiration date.

A few cool, useful ways to reuse old t-shirts include..

  • Sewing them into a pillow
  • Quilting a thin blanket
  • Using them for layering in an animal’s crate
  • Or, if you plan on moving, wrapping them up around fragile objects.

4. Banana Peels

Yes, banana peels. One way to make the use of old banana peels is using them to shine your shoes. Honestly, these do a wonder of cleaning your shoes.

My old lady and I have also had a wonderful time whitening our teeth in a day or two, using banana peels. Simply cut apart a few slices to however wide your teeth are then apply the banana strip for a few minutes. You will notice a difference in less than 5 days.

Other uses for banana peels include removing warts, splinters, and gardening. There are a ton of uses for banana peels you won’t believe.

5. Egg Cartons

I love eggs. When the old lady and I go grocery shopping every 2 weeks, I make an executive decision to pick up 3 cartons of 12 large eggs (total $7.50). Each of those 36 eggs is gone by the next time for groceries. At least 4 eggs every other day for breakfast, an egg salad sandwich for lunch and 3 eggs before bed (which the protein keeps me sated and full during sleep – preventing my stomach from eating itself alive)…

Yeah, eggs are my life.

One example of ways to reuse egg cartons is using them as a freezing tray. Think about it: it’s spaghetti night and you made one too many meatballs. The noodle-to-meat ratio will be askew if you pile them all in there.

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Solution? Store those meatballs in your thoroughly-cleaned egg cartons!

You can even use them to store loose change, golf balls, etc. Go crazy.

6. Old Socks

Are you terrible with socks? I’m terrible with socks. One half goes missing, I spend two minutes (if that) looking for it, then give up, go out and buy a package of 6 more socks.

The process repeats itself. It’s insane!

Not only does it make me feel like an idiot (at the time), but it wastes money. That’s without considering the fact that, during laundry time, at least half of those lost halves pop up.

Yes, half of them pop up. What happens to the other half? I don’t know. Maybe sock ninjas take them in the middle of the night. It’s happened before.

And, you guessed it, I throw the newly-found half away. Why shouldn’t I? There’s no need for them with these new socks.

Luckily, I’ve found out new uses for old socks that include:

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  • Using them as dog/cat toys (or catnip for the cat – be sure to sew catnip socks shut)
  • Wearing them over dirty shoes when you’re inside the home
  • Use them as containers for paper clips, screws, bolts, hair ties, etc.

7. Shoe Boxes

My old lady loves shoes. There’s no reason to blame her – people want what they want. We’re both guilty of having too many shoeboxes pile up in the storage room, though, she wears those new shoes every time, she had to go hospital for a check-up, just so that she can look down on her feet and forget the miseries she is going through. There I saw a microscope having a tag “refurbished – saving planet!” Wasn’t that interesting?

My crime is the Well I’ll use it for later syndrome. My logic is storing handwritten notes and manuscripts and what not in the shoeboxes. It seems smart, right?

One way to put those boxes to use is by using them as storage bins for the closet. How convenient! All it takes is wrapping paper and scotch tape to hold the paper together. How much money will you save by doing this, instead of buying $15-25 storage bins?

True, those store-bought bins let you store more… but (if you’re like us) you might end up chugging a whole bunch of unrelated/found “junk” in them and make another mess. Shoeboxes gives you chances to store your similar items in manageable boxes – each for exactly what you need.

8. Milk Jugs

Along with eggs, I love milk. It is a personal struggle to make one jug more than a week; I have to force myself not to drink the entire jug that day. This like, shoeboxes and egg cartons, creates a huge quantity of tossed away gallon jugs.

One way to deal with empty jugs is to poke small, tack-sized holes in the bottoms of the jugs and bury them in your garden or planting pots. Wham! Instant watering jugs, providing a slow and steady irrigation for your lovelies. This is a GREAT way of going green and saving the environment.

Have the same problem with 2-liter bottles? (We do – we can’t get enough of 2-liter Ginger Ale. At $1.59 per bottle, you can see why.) A simple way for reusing those cleaned-out bottles, that helps the environment, is to transform bottles into bird feeders.

9. Coffee Grinds

I’m starting to feel self-conscious. This is why: I love coffee! Eggs, milk, coffee? Yes, I’m the trifecta. But, doctors have reported that coffee is actually healthy for you.

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If you’re like me, enough is never enough – I personally can plow through four mugs before noon.

So, what to do with all those used coffee grounds? Rather than throw them out (where they’ll be sent to the landfill), place them in a jar and set it in your fridge. This little hack is phenomenal for obliterating odors!

Another trick is a bit simpler and gardeners swear by it: use coffee grounds around garden plants to keep plant-killing ants and slugs at bay. I don’t know why this works, but people swear it does.

Bonus tip: my old lady swears that using coffee grounds removes old, dried skin from her face. Every morning she grabs several scoops and slathers it over her face – and you know what? She looks absolutely beautiful whenever I see her. Maybe there’s something to this.

10. Reuse Toilet Paper Rolls

There’s no going around it, everybody goes through toilet paper like no tomorrow. There’s no shame in it – we eat a lot, we drink a lot. Going to the bathroom frequently is a sign of a healthy digestive tract.

Still, rather than sending all those toilet paper rolls to the garbage can, reusing them for DIY projects is pretty cool – and a far more healthy alternative.

Some awesome things you can take a stab at are:

  • Toy race cars
  • USB cord containers (this one I personally tried and absolutely LOVE!)
  • They can even serve as cable cord holders

There’s no shortage of toilet paper craft projects you can try on for size.

Going green isn’t a difficult choice – it’s just a matter of applying it yourself and thinking outside the box. Start making a difference today; for yourself, the future of your planet, and hopefully your children.

Featured photo credit: pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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