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How To Manage Stress from Short-Term, High-Pressure Jobs

How To Manage Stress from Short-Term, High-Pressure Jobs

Most of us will work from 9 to 5, perhaps in a fancy office with great perks like free lunches. However, the labor market has changed a lot since the industrial revolution; and many – if not most – people are now working in short-term, high-pressure jobs.

These are divers, freelancers, healthcare professionals, pilots, and consultants to name just a few. They may not be stuck in a cubicle for five days a week, but they usually deal with a lot of pressure due to the time-bound nature of their occupation.

The beauty of a short-term job is that you get longer breaks.

For instance: a saturation diver normally works in a high-stress environment for about a month installing underwater gas or oil wells. But he or she has the luxury of two months off after a certain project is done. This is great if you want a long vacation or more personal time.

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If you or someone you know is currently working in a short-term, high-pressure job, here are a couple of tips from experienced folks on how to manage stress.

1 Get as Much Rest During Your Time-Off

For more than 20 years, saturation diver, Sam Archer, has worked for six hours in the pitch black sea, resting for at least a month or two, before going back to work underwater. The pay is good – but the dangers are real. Divers are known to die while on the job, and Archer has lost some great comrades due to the hazardous nature of the occupation. The work itself is pretty routine and tiring; but for someone who loves the deep blue sea, nothing could be as thrilling or as rewarding.

So how does one cope with the stress of working underwater? During workdays, he relaxes while watching his favorite TV series or he reads. He also stresses on tolerance and how getting along with colleagues is very important. On his time-off, Archer spends quality time with his loved ones and immersing himself in his hobbies.

Short-term, high-pressure jobs can drain even the healthiest amongst us. The trick is using days off to recharge and unwind. Whether you have three days or one month to spare, make sure to spend every minute on stuff you enjoy.

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2 Plan How To Balance Your Life

Work-life balance is NOT a myth. However, unless you deliberately plan for it, it’s not going to happen. People with high-stress jobs manage to remain productive and still fulfill private roles because they make the necessary changes to ensure they can effectively juggle their work and personal life.

A&E (accident and emergency) consultant, Dr. Simon Eccles, understands that most stress comes from things we cannot control. In his job, remaining calm even while under pressure is a must. But seeing patients suffer or having to tell a person’s family the bad news is never easy. So Eccles decided to make a drastic decision to help him cope with the rigorous demands of his career: he changed hospitals.

Now, although the job can be long and demanding, Eccles found it easier to deal with everyday stressors because it only takes 12 minutes for him to get home. This has also helped him spend more time with his family.

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3 Get In The Zone

Burn nurse Melanie McMahon has a special job. In a hospital’s tank room, she quietly treats burn victims, adults and children alike. She scrapes away charred tissue, debrides swollen blisters, administers pain medication, and wraps bandages around bloody flesh. It may seem discomforting to most, and McMahon admits that not a lot of people can do what she does for a living – but it’s something she loves.

So how does one cope with graphical images everyday, not to mention the emotional toll it’s going to take? McMahon says she simply treats her patients and avoids thinking about their situation. She gets “in the zone”, so to speak. This has helped her remain calm, while providing the needed care to patients and their family. Most of all, she stresses how much she enjoys her job.

When you like what you do, no matter the stress, you will find ways to deal with it so you continue to be productive. Focusing on your current task should keep stress under control; just until you can get home to relax.

Conclusion

In high-pressure jobs, things can always go wrong – but HOW you react to them is critical.

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If a colleague annoys you, you don’t always have to retort with a snarky remark. You can simply walk away. If you missed a deadline, there’s no use fussing over spilled milk. It happens. What you can do now is learn from this mistake so it doesn’t repeat itself.

Be deliberate in wanting to stay in control of your job and your emotions.

One of the most valuable skills you need in any modern workplace is the ability to determine what you’re feeling at the moment. If something seems too much for you to handle, don’t be afraid to step outside. Take mini-breaks or pause in the middle of a decision. That tiny step might just be what you need to manage stress.

Featured photo credit: MasimbaTinasheMadondo via pixabay.com

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Published on September 8, 2019

The Lifehack Show Episode 7: Following Your Calling

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