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Don’t like your job? Here are some solutions.

Don’t like your job? Here are some solutions.

Don’t like your job? Here are some possible solutions that could help you find more satisfaction and fulfillment in your work days.

1. Feeling stressed out and overwhelmed at work, with little control over your work duties? Start by decreasing your stress outside of work.

If you feel overwhelmed with your job and there’s not an easy, quick solution to decreasing your stress at work, start working on decreasing your stress outside of work. Start making the daily tasks in your personal life more efficient, so you can spend more time doing things you really enjoy.

Get rid of the unimportant, time-sucking activities that aren’t adding value to your life. Use the time you save to do something that brings you joy. Set goals in your personal life and design a very fulfilling personal life.

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2. Feeling like you’re not making a difference? Discover your natural strengths and passions.

The book Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath can help you discover your strengths. Learn about your strengths and seek ways in your current job to maximize these strengths. When you capitalize on your innate strengths, you can make a big impact.

If you’re working in a career field that doesn’t align with your innate strengths, create ways in your job to use your strengths. If you are an achiever, volunteer to lead a new project or initiative. If positivity is one of your core strengths, spread that positive outlook around!

Along with developing a strong understanding of your strengths, it’s helpful to discover your passions. If you’re not sure what you’re passionate about, check out this free workbook to help you find your passion. When you can do work you absolutely love, your career becomes much more fulfilling and Monday mornings can actually be awesome.

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3. Struggling to find meaning in your career? Seek connection.

If your work feels meaningless, create meaning in your work by finding ways to feel connected. Connect with your coworkers. Connect with a cause your employer donates to. Connect with your clients.

When you create connection, it can increase your sense of purpose for your career. Connection also makes life much more fulfilling. Create ways to connect with people in your work environment, so your job becomes more to you than just a paycheck.

4. Exhausting work hours? Be open to creative solutions.

If your work hours are exhausting and you want to change that, there are a variety of potential solutions. Could you possibly work from home some days and decrease the constant flow of interruptions that tire you out? Will your boss allow you to work 4 day weeks instead of 5, so you could decrease your time spent commuting? Are you willing to decrease luxuries in your personal life to be able to decrease your hours at work and accept a salary cut?

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Being flexible and open to creative solutions can help you find a solution to your exhausting work hours.

5. Want to make a different impact on the world than your work allows you to do? Create an exit plan.

If you want to make a different impact on the world than your work allows you to do, remember that you can make someone’s day every day and you can spend each day brightening other people’s lives. Go to work each day with the goal of making someone’s day. Create purpose and impact in your current career.

This above strategies can definitely help you make an impact and make your work life more tolerable and ultimately, but if you are feeling a tugging in your heart to make a different impact on the world than your work allows you to do, start creating your exit plan.

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Determine what actions you’ll need to take to transition into a career you love and start taking those steps. Life is too short to spend your years feeling stifled in a job that doesn’t light you up.

Featured photo credit: Brooke Cagle / www.unsplash.com via hd.unsplash.com

More by this author

Dr. Kerry Petsinger

Entrepreneur, Mindset & Performance Coach, & Doctor of Physical Therapy

Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again How to Find the Purpose of Life and Start Living a Fulfilling Life Don’t like your job? Here are some solutions. How People Make Decisions That Are Bad For Them How to Have a Successful Career and a Fulfilling Personal Life

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Last Updated on September 18, 2019

If Money Can’t Buy Happiness, What Can?

If Money Can’t Buy Happiness, What Can?

Think of the last time your bought something you really wanted. How did you feel afterwards? It felt good.

    Now, is there something else you really want? Maybe a new laptop, smartphone, or some nice clothes. Buying that thing, whatever it is, will bring you happiness. When you finally have it, you will be excited to try it out.

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          As cliche as it says “money can’t buy happiness,” we feel happy when we buy the things we want. Why is that?

          The Real Reason Why You Are Happy When You Buy Stuff

          Human beings are hardwired to seek instant gratification. You’ve probably heard the phrase instant gratification hundreds of times. To get that thing we want, the moment we want it. This desire for instant gratification came to us as a survival mechanism. I’m not going to talk about instant gratification in details here, if you want to find out more about it, take a look at 5 Ways to Get Over Approval Addiction and Instant Gratification.

          While instant gratification is in human’s nature, we live in a society driven by delayed gratification. Delayed gratification is the desire for something but the inability to get it when you want. In our society, you have to wait for your pay day, your meal at a restaurant, your coffee at Starbucks. When the thing you want finally arrives, you get excited.

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            Your excitement for this thing, the delayed gratification often elicits stronger emotional responses in you than when you get it. This feeling comes from dopamine a chemical that influences the pleasure centers in our brains.[1] When you become excited for something, you are actually enjoying a release of dopamine into our system. The thing you are actually excited for is almost secondary to it.

            Think about it, how did you feel a couple hours after buying something you waited a long time for? It was probably not nearly as good as when you first got it, or when you’re waiting to get it. It’s natural, it’s a part of human nature.

              In this way the happiness you feel isn’t true happiness. In fact, biologically speaking, you’re just enjoying a blast of dopamine. When this blast of dopamine is gone, you want something new again, which is secretly, more dopamine. This is what that old saying “money can’t buy you happiness” really means.

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              There is, however, a way in which money can buy you happiness. It’s just not in a way you think.

              An Alternative to Buying Happiness

              Recently Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA conducted a study where two groups of people were given $40 each.[2] One group was told to spend it in buying a possession, an object, something they wanted. The other group was told to spend it in ways that would enable them to have more free time, for example, having food delivered to save them from cooking, or hiring a cleaner, instead of cleaning their house themselves. When each participant in the study were to measure their happiness to a 10 point scale, those who spent their money on more free time were almost always one whole point ahead of those who spent their money on stuff.

              In a sense, they were happier because they brought themselves out of doing something they didn’t want to do. Just buying more stuff, in the long run didn’t have much of an affect on their happiness, when those who spent money on time found an increase in life satisfaction.

              It was the free time that made people happy.

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                It was the quality time that contributed more to their happiness, the money was just a tool they used to get more time. But the money ultimately is unnecessary. All that is required is a re-adjustment of how you measure time.

                Everyone has 24 hours a day. The life expectancy for females is 81.2 years; for males, it’s 76.4 years. Most people have more or less the same time of living. To make every hour, or minute count is the way to create your own happy time. If you are always feeling busy and don’t think you have enough quality time for yourself, you need to make a change to turn things around.

                To be truly happy, make quality time a true value in your life. Find out how to do so in my other article How to Gain More Time Like Making Money.

                More About Happiness

                Featured photo credit: Priscilla Du Preez via unsplash.com

                Reference

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