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5 Ways to Become More Comfortable In a Job Interview

5 Ways to Become More Comfortable In a Job Interview

Let’s face it; job interviews are often stressful, nerve-wracking and just plain awkward. We all try our best to be prepared before going into each interview, but no matter how much we prepare, it is impossible to anticipate every twist and turn. If there’s no way of knowing exactly how an interview will play out–what questions the interviewer will ask or how your personalities will mesh–the best you can do is take steps to feel as relaxed and comfortable as possible. Check out these five tips for becoming more comfortable in a job interview:

1. Do your research

A big part of feeling confident in an interview is coming into it prepared. The best way to prepare for any interview is to research. Research the company. Learn everything you can about how the company started, what their goals are, who their audience is and what their company culture is like. If you come into the interview with knowledge, your questions and answers will sound more informed. Show the interviewer that you are serious about the position. Lastly, you should research the fastest commute to the office and determine exactly how much time you need to get there. Rushing will only make you more stressed.

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2. Get plenty of sleep

When you don’t get enough sleep, your cognitive skills suffer. Your ability to problem-solve and make decisions is at a depreciated level, which will make your skills as an interviewee suffer. Make sure you are well-rested and on top of your game. Head to bed early the night before an interview. If you typically have a difficult time falling asleep, get some exercise a couple of hours before bedtime, have a cup of caffeine-free tea or read a book in bed. Do whatever you can to fall asleep at a reasonable hour.

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3. Learn about the interviewer

We’ve all been there: you shake hands with the interviewer, introduce yourself, then realize you have nothing to say other than memorized answers to questions that haven’t been asked. Put yourself at ease by learning a little bit about the interviewer ahead of time. This doesn’t mean learning everything about them, just know the basics. LinkedIn is a good place to start. Where did he/she go to college? What companies did he/she work for previously? What groups is he/she a part of? Take your research a step further by checking out his/her Facebook profile. Do you have friends or interests in common? Having little pieces of knowledge in your back pocket will help fill any awkward silences throughout the interview.

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4. Know your best traits

The purpose of an interview is to sell yourself to the interviewer. So, it is very important that you are aware of your best selling points. Consider past performance reviews; what did your manager frequently commend you on? Ask your coworkers what they think your best professional qualities are. Be confident about your best traits and use them in your interview to show who you are.

5. Create a conversation

One of the best ways to put yourself and the interviewer (who might also be uncomfortable) at ease is to start a conversation. After all, one thing the interviewer is looking for during an interview is to see how you would fit in with the other employees. If you can turn the question-and-answer format of an interview into an easy, flowing conversation, that will show him/her that you can work well with others. One easy way to start a conversation is by turning your answer to a question into another question for the interview. For example, the interviewer might ask you, “How long did you work for Microsoft?” You answer, “About 4 years. Have you ever been to their headquarters?” From there, a conversation can begin.

Finally, put an end to the dreaded awkward interview by becoming an interview expert. The biggest part of acing an interview is feeling comfortable. Once you master the ways to prepare and be comfortable for an interview, every interview in the future will start to feel like just another conversation.

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Last Updated on August 20, 2018

Quit Your Job If You Don’t Like It, No Matter What

Quit Your Job If You Don’t Like It, No Matter What

Do you know that feeling? The one where you have to wake up to go to your boring 9-5 job to work with the same boring colleagues who don’t appreciate what you do.

I do, and that’s why I’ve decided to quit my job and follow my passion. This, however, requires a solid plan and some guts.

The one who perseveres doesn’t always win. Sometimes life has more to offer when you quit your current job. Yes, I know. It’s overwhelming and scary.

People who quit are often seen as ‘losers’. They say: “You should finish what you’ve started”.

I know like no other that quitting your job can be very stressful. A dozen questions come up when you’re thinking about quitting your job, most starting with: What if?

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“What if I don’t find a job I love and regret quitting my current job?”
“What if I can’t find another job and I get in debt because I can’t pay my bills?”
“What if my family and friends judge me and disapprove of the decisions I make?”
“What if I quit my job to pursue my dream, but I fail?

After all, if you admit to the truth of your surroundings, you’re forced to acknowledge that you’ve made a wrong decision by choosing your current job. But don’t forget that quitting certain things in life can be the path to your success!

One of my favorite quotes by Henry Ford:

If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.

Everything takes energy

Everything you do in life takes energy. It takes energy to participate in your weekly activities. It takes energy to commute to work every day. It takes energy to organize your sister’s big wedding.

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Each of the responsibilities we have take a little bit of our energy. We only have a certain amount of energy a day, so we have to spend it wisely.  Same goes for our time. The only things we can’t buy in this world are time and energy. Yes, you could buy an energy drink, but will it feel the same as eight hours of sleep? Will it be as healthy?

The more stress there is in your life, the less focus you have. This will weaken your results.

Find something that is worth doing

Do you have to quit every time the going gets touch? Absolutely not! You should quit when you’ve put everything you’ve got into something, but don’t see a bright future in it.

When you do something you love and that has purpose in your life, you should push through and give everything you have.

I find star athletes very inspiring. They don’t quit till they step on that stage to receive their hard earned gold medal. From the start, they know how much work its going to take and what they have to sacrifice.

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When you do something you’re really passionate about, you’re not in a downward spiral. Before you even start you can already see the finish line. The more focus you have for something, the faster you’ll reach the finish.

It is definitely possible to spend your valuable time on something you love and earn money doing it. You just have to find out how — by doing enough research.

Other excuses I often hear are:

“But I have my wife and kids, who is going to pay the bills?”
“I don’t have time for that, I’m too busy with… stuff” (Like watching TV for 2 hours every day.)
“At least I get the same paycheck every month if I work for a boss.”
“Quitting my job is too much risk with this crisis.”

I understand those points. But if you’ve never tried it, you’ll never know how it could be. The fear of failure keeps people from stepping out of their comfort zone.

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I’ve heard many people say, “I work to let my children make their dream come true”. I think they should rephrase that sentence to: “I pursue my dreams — to inspire and show my children anything is possible.” 

Conclusion

Think carefully about what you spend your time on. Don’t waste it on things that don’t brighten your future. Instead, search for opportunities. And come up with a solid plan before you take any impulsive actions.

Only good things happen outside of your comfort zone.

Do you dare to quit your job for more success in life?

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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