Advertising
Advertising

Students Who Play Online Games Perform Better At School, Research Finds

Students Who Play Online Games Perform Better At School, Research Finds

Video games are a blast. Online games can be even more fun because of the social aspect surrounding them. You get to play with your friends and even meet new friends online. But video games aren’t just fun – research has shown there to be a correlation between online gamers and better school performance!

Note that this finding is a correlation, not a causation. This means playing video games won’t guarantee you perform well in school, it only increases your chances – as long as you don’t let them overtake your school work; all things in moderation!

Advertising

The Research

A study was done in Australia involving over 12,000 high school students. They found that when it came to internet usage, students who regularly played online video games scored higher in math, reading, and science tests than students who didn’t.

“Students who play online games almost every day score 15 points above the average in maths and 17 points above the average in science,” says economist Alberto Posso from RMIT University in Melbourne. “When you play online games you’re solving puzzles to move to the next level and that involves using some of the general knowledge and skills in maths, reading, and science that you’ve been taught during the day.”

Advertising

The study used Australian data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tested students from more than 700 schools in 2012 and collected information on their personal interests and online activities. Posso suggests that students who regularly spend time playing online games are developing analytical and problem-solving skills that can also help them in their schoolwork.

“Sometimes players have to understand some of the principles of chemistry even, so they really have to understand science,” Posso told Bridget Brennan at the ABC. “Some psychologists have argued that massive online player games can be beneficial to cognitive development.”

Advertising

As I said in the beginning, the study hasn’t proven causation – and Posso isn’t ready to say that gaming is what’s leading to better grades. It’s merely an association.

Why do gamers seem to get higher grades?

Posso isn’t entirely sure why they are correlated with higher grades yet. He thinks that one possibility could be some students find it easier to get their study and homework done faster. However, there are a number of potential factors, including skills associated with gaming, how students choose to fill their spare time, and family environments. Posso says it’s a promising area for future studies to investigate – and other researchers agree.

Advertising

“It’s interesting that this study showed a positive correlation between online gaming and academic performance, but we really need better ways of understanding how and why people play video games before we’re able to tease apart what that correlation actually means, if anything,” biological psychologist Peter Etchells from Bath Spa University in the UK, who wasn’t involved with the research, told Samuel Gibbs at The Guardian. “A number of researchers have been trying to highlight this issue for a while,” he added, “but we really need more detailed research and nuanced data to answer these sorts of questions more confidently.”

Researchers may not be able to explain this association yet, but there is more good news for the online gamers out there. Other recent research suggests gaming is good for your learning abilities, powers of memory, motor skills – and can even potentially be used for recovering from brain injuries.

To all the online gamers out there – don’t let people tell you games are rotting your brain! Research shows games seem to do more good than harm, despite popular opinion. Keep on gaming!

If you’re interested in reading more about it, check out the findings reported in the International Journal of Communication.

More by this author

Bill Widmer

Content Marketing Expert

4 Ways to Develop a Flexible Mindset 10 Signs You’re A Highly Rational Thinker Do You Know The Meaning Of Fruit Stickers? They Can Hugely Affect Your Health Still Believe Long Workout Is Good For Your Heart? You Should Exercise In This Way Instead! Uncertainty Makes You Anxious? 3 Ways To Face The Future With Confidence

Trending in Productivity

1 The Ultimate Morning Routine for Success of Highly Successful People 2 10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful 3 Powerful Daily Routine Examples for a Healthier Life 4 How to Increase Willpower and Be Mentally Tough 5 How to Influence People and Make Them Feel Good

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

Advertising

I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

Advertising

My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

Advertising

Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

Advertising

Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

Read Next