Advertising
Advertising

10 Most Affordable Colleges for Art and Music Programs

10 Most Affordable Colleges for Art and Music Programs

When choosing the best college for arts and music programs, there are a few very important things to consider. First and foremost is the sheer cost of a creative education. This list will not only provide options that are the most affordable in the country, but they are also located in areas that are culturally rich with art and music.

1. Suffolk University New England School of Art and Design

Boston is the 11th best city for music, and the 5th best one for art. Creative students can receive a quality education for much less than other art and music schools. They can also receive their art and design education while still receiving the benefits of liberal arts and general studies courses.

Advertising

2. Brenau University

Brenau University is located just a short drive from one of the best artistic and musical centers of the south, namely Atlanta. Students will get the best in art education as well as their liberal arts courses. There are separate departments for dance, music, theater, art and design, and interior design. Special programs include Design Exhibition and Young Women’s Art.

3. CUNY- Hunter College

This college is among the top art schools in the U.S. Choose from the many programs offered, like art history, art education, studio art, film and video, electronic design and multimedia, and music and audio technology. The inexpensive tuition paired with the multitude of scholarships and fellowships makes CUNY a great option for a creative mind. Students may also receive the opportunity to complete research at Stanford.

Advertising

4. George Mason University

Only a short drive from Washington, D.C., GMU offers majors in film and video, dance, visual technology, art education, music, art management, and theater. Their Center for the Arts hosts a large performance hall that is home to many productions including theater performances, art shows, music and dance productions.

5. Appalachian State University

ASU’s College of Fine and Applied Arts include majors like art and theater, as well as more unique majors like environmental design, military science and design. Students can also make their own programs. The school is also home to many workshops, exhibitions, recitals, concerts, and exhibitions as well as their summer arts festival which is nationally recognized.

Advertising

6. Memphis College of Art

Grad students will find their campus in historic downtown, while undergraduates will find theirs in the middle of a beautiful park. The scenic surroundings provide much inspiration for this independent, yet accredited college. Each program is integrated and interdisciplinary, allowing the students to gain knowledge regarding networking, entrepreneurship, self-promotion, and communication skills.

7. University of South Florida

Unique resources, an excess of art electives, and even a doctoral program for music education, USF has four distinct schools for arts and music majors. The school boasts of two concert halls, a museum, an art gallery, three theaters, a digital media lab, and a graphics studio while putting on over 300 activities like workshops, performances, and events for students and the community.

Advertising

8. Illinois State University

With majors in graphic design, studio art, art history, music education, acting, and so much more, ISU is just a short drive from Chicago. There are several galleries located at the university, a studio for graphic artists, five ensembles that music enthusiasts may join, and a calendar that is jam packed with events relating to music and the arts.

9. University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee

UW’s Peck School of the Arts will prepare all students to excel in their art careers by preparing them for the innovative, financial, and business situations that they will encounter while on their journey. This campus offers areas of study that are unique—like dual discipline majors and a program that marries arts and technology.

10. University of Las Vegas

Out of the bustling city and in a suburb, students are still in a wonderful region to explore all things cultural, musical, artistic, and entertaining. UNLV boasts lower than average tuition while still having facilities for students of the arts, including studios, and architectural library, performance halls, and theaters.

More by this author

Sasha Brown

Seasoned Blogger

11 Obvious Signs He Wants to Marry You 11 Signs He Wants to Marry You (Even You Are at the Early Stages) 11 Must-Follow Natural Health Blogs for 2017 11 Must-Follow Natural Health Blogs for 2017 11 Tools to Help You Keep Track of Your Remote Employees 11 Tools to Help You Keep Track of Your Remote Employees 7 Ways to Effectively Cope With Emotional Stress Seven Ways to Effectively Cope with Emotional Stress 10 amazon review sites that will get you really good deals 10 Amazon Review Sites That Will Get You Really Good Deals

Trending in Productivity

1 5 Practical Ways to Get Over a Mental Block 2 How to Use the 5 Whys to Get to the Root Cause of Any Problem 3 6 Characteristics of an Effective Leadership 4 15 Must-Have Qualities of a Good Leader 5 20 Useful Things to Learn Now That Will Change Your Life

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on September 17, 2020

5 Practical Ways to Get Over a Mental Block

5 Practical Ways to Get Over a Mental Block

There’s nothing quite like a state of “flow” when you’re working. The rare moments when your inspiration aligns with your motivation likely lead to some of your most creative work. Plus, it feels great to actually check a task or project off the list so you can move on to the next thing. Meanwhile, a mental block — its opposite — can cause work to feel laborious and uninspired. Forget creativity when you have a mental block — it makes it difficult even to start working on what you need to do.

A mental block can manifest in several ways. Perhaps your imposter syndrome is squelching your creative ideas, for instance, or you’re overwhelmed by the breadth of a project and its impending deadline. Maybe you’re just tired or stressed.

Either way, having a mental block feels like being trapped in your own head, and it can seriously dampen your ability to think outside the box. The problem is, you’re so locked into your own perspective that you don’t see more innovative approaches to your problems.[1]

Luckily, jumping over these mental hurdles is simpler than you think. You just need the right strategies to get your flow back.

Try these five practical ways to overcome a mental block.

1. Break Your Project Down

A few years ago, I was working on changing a company product that I believed would hugely benefit our customers. Sounds great, right?

Advertising

As inspired as I was to make people’s lives easier, though, the sheer magnitude of the task at hand felt overwhelming. Every morning, I cracked open my laptop to work and felt totally paralyzed. I loved the idea, yes, but actualizing it felt risky. What if it didn’t turn out the way I pictured in my mind? More importantly, where would I even begin?

A former colleague gave me great advice over coffee:

Change how you think. Start by breaking the big project down into small tasks.

When a major project overwhelms you, you only see the entire forest instead of the individual trees. And as you stare it down, you start to feel discouraged by your own lack of progress, thus slowing you down further.

Breaking down a massive task into smaller chunks makes the work feel more manageable. You’ll have multiple clear places to start and end with, which will lend a motivating sense of productivity and mastery to your process. Learn more about it here: The Motivation Flowchart: The Mental Process of Successful People

Think of it as accumulating small wins. When you realize you’re more capable than you have once thought, you’ll develop the momentum and confidence needed to get your big job done little by little.[2]

Advertising

2. Change Up Your Scenery

Of course, there’s a time and place for sitting down to get things done. But if you’re experiencing a mental block, switching up your surroundings can make a big difference in your output.

Have you ever noticed how your environment directly impacts your performance and mood?

Your brain associates your physical surroundings with certain feelings and activities. So, if you feel mentally stuck, your mind may need some new sensory stimuli.

During this time in your life, it may not be possible to set up shop at a cafe or move from your cubicle to a conference room, so you may need to think outside the box. If you’re working remotely in a home office, try going to your dining table or couch. If the weather cooperates, sit outside for a bit with your computer or take a walk around the block.

You can also simply rearrange your workspace. Not sure where to begin? Try decluttering. Some studies show that an organized desk enhances productivity.[3]

The point is to stimulate your brain with new sounds and sights. You may find a much-needed dose of inspiration when you work while breathing in the fresh air, listening to city sounds, or staying in the comfort of your own living space.

Advertising

3. Do an Unrelated Activity

When it comes to productivity, a bit of distraction isn’t always a bad thing. That’s especially true if your chosen distraction helps you get things done in the long run.

Have you realized how your most creative thoughts tend to bubble up when you’re, say, lying in bed or taking a shower? In their research of the “incubation period,” scientists have discovered that people’s best ideas seem to surface when they aren’t actively trying to solve a problem.[4]

In a 2010 study, participants needed to look for a roommate or new employee based on the profiles that the researchers gave. The people who had a brief “incubation period” — in this case, working on an anagram — consistently made better choices than those who spent more time weighing their options.

If you can’t seem to prime your brain for a project, try doing something completely unrelated to work, such as washing your dishes, working out, or calling a friend. Some experts say finding another low-stake project to work on can help jump-start the creative part of your brain and activate your flow.[5]

The key is to allow your unconscious mind to do its best work: eliciting the new knowledge your conscious mind may be ignoring or suppressing.[6]

4. Be Physical

Feeling antsy? When your mind won’t seem to settle into a state of flow, it may help to swap out your mental activity for a physical one and see how it impacts your perspective.

Advertising

While any physical activity is beneficial for your body — and getting up to move can serve as a helpful form of distraction — certain forms of exercise can more directly impact the mind. To be specific, relaxing, flow-based exercises like dance, yoga, or tai chi can create a gentle sense of momentum in your body, which can prime your brain for the same state.

Stress-reducing activities may also be necessary. Meditating or taking slow, deep breaths will also calm your nervous system if you’re feeling overwhelmed. Evidence shows that the logical, creative part of your brain essentially shuts off when you’re stressed.[7]

On the flip side, when your mind and body are relaxed, you can think more clearly, be more creative, and focus for longer periods — all of which will help you overcome a mental block.

5. Don’t Force It

It can be frustrating to fight against your own mind. If your mental block won’t go away after some effort, it may be time to take a break. Forcing creative thoughts only adds to your stress levels, which in turn inhibits your ability to think creatively. And if you sit and stare at a project for too long, you’ll not only waste valuable time but also begin to associate this specific work with frustration and produce work you’re not proud of.

“I know that forcing something is not going to create anything beyond mediocre, so I step aside and work on a different project until it hits me,” the artist Ben Skinner said about his creative process.[8]

If your work isn’t time-sensitive, then it may make sense to step away for a while to focus on something else, be it an administrative task that requires less creativity or a project that you feel motivated to work on.

When the time is right, you’ll find your way back to the original task with a fresh, creative perspective (hopefully).

More on Getting Rid of a Mental Block

Featured photo credit: Jonas Leupe via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next