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People Who Learn Faster Have These 2 Characteristics

People Who Learn Faster Have These 2 Characteristics

There are many types of intelligence, from emotional to bodily-kinesthetic, linguistics, and beyond. There are also just as many learning techniques. Anyone who turns to the internet for tips on tricks on how to learn faster will find a staggering number of views on the subject. It’s trendy to want to learn more, better, and faster. It’s a hot topic and the experts have a lot to say.

If you want to learn faster but are tired of the hype, take note of these two common traits among individuals who learn faster.

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1. They have growth mindsets and pursue knowledge with curiosity.

Growth mindset individuals believe in possibility, including their ability to grow. Aware that they can develop and change their intelligence, these learners are less likely to shy away from challenging things. Fixed mindset individuals, on the other hand, are more likely to avoid subjects in which they struggle. They also despair when they are overlooked for promotion or receive negative feedback from bosses or coworkers. When it comes to learning, those who develop growth mindsets have a clear advantage.

Inquisitiveness serves another important role in the making of a fast learner. Their curiosity leads them to new subjects. The more they learn, the greater their appetite for novelty. Sure, a fast learner might double as a walking encyclopedia when it comes to specialized topics like the RMS Titanic, but these knowledge seekers also pursue the unique, and the brain thrives on challenge. Giving the brain new material makes it sharper and faster, and therefore more sensitive to error. The brain is truly capable of change. Fast learners become increasingly faster with practice.

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2. They are more sensitive to errors and then to learn from them.

Fast learners are able to deduce meaning from abstract or obscure information through reason. For example, they can approach a convoluted argument, identify the key points, and extrapolate the essential meaning. Individuals who excel at learning use deductive reasoning to problem solve, judge positions based on evidence, and manipulate information to develop new arguments. They synthesize new material by drawing connections to other pieces of knowledge they’ve acquired. The ability to infer also allows these learners to guess more quickly and accurately than average learners.

Growth mindset individuals also demonstrate differences in the brain from those with fixed mindsets. Numerous studies have shown that people learn more effectively when their brains exhibit two properties. These learners have larger error-related negativity (ERN) signals, suggesting a bigger initial response to mistakes. They also show more consistent error-related positivity (Pe) signals, which indicates that they are probably paying attention to the error and, therefore, trying to learn from it.

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The Value of Hard Work

Arguably the most critical quality for quick learning is the willingness to work hard. You may be the next Einstein in terms of natural ability, but your talent is of little value if you don’t work diligently to improve your learning. Having some grit is one of the qualities that distinguishes amateurs from experts across all fields.

Having grit is like having a strong immune system. It prevents us from giving up when met with adversity. For example, if we make a mistake and misread the instructions on a test, having determination helps us learn from the experience. We’re much less likely to make the same mistake twice if we’ve paid attention and adjusted our behavior accordingly. People with sticktoitiveness are definitely members of the growth mindset camp. They persevere with their inquisitions because they have allowed themselves to make mistakes.

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Fixed mindset, perfectionist people of the world beware! Hard-working and investigative thinkers are out-learning you in big ways. They believe in their ability to learn and defy the fear of failure. With greater feelings of self-worth, they remain committed to their interests. Growth mindset learners approach life with more creativity and are always up for a challenge.

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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