Advertising
Advertising

How To Overcome Confirmation Bias And Expand Your Mind

How To Overcome Confirmation Bias And Expand Your Mind

All of humanity lives with some degree of bias — it cannot be helped. Bias is forged into our minds from our formative years, passed down from parents, siblings, teachers, and friends. Many biases are not detrimental, but there are some that are harmful and will keep you from finding your true potential, from finding truth and from expanding your mind. The most limiting type of bias is confirmation bias, which simply means that when you look for information about something, you are looking through the lens of your preconceptions about the subject. When this happens, you will keep on searching until you find what fits with what you already think or believe.

People who want to expand their minds need to re-learn how to search for and process information without confirmation bias. Here are a few good ways to overcome confirmation bias to expand your mind.

Advertising

1. Don’t Be Afraid

Sometimes, when people hear the phrase “expand your mind,” they automatically think they will be brainwashed into believing some weird ideas, but it simply means to acquire the ability to think more deeply about ideas and beliefs. There is no need to be afraid of new ideas or someone else’s opinions. Expanding your way of thinking doesn’t mean you have to agree or disagree with someone or something — you will be able to think more critically about the world around you, and the world needs more deep thinkers!

2. Know That Your Ego Doesn’t Want You To Expand Your Mind

Ego gets in the way of so many things. It is beneficial to know who you are, but be on the lookout for your ego. Humility is not a virtue that is celebrated much today, but the world would be a better place if it was. When you try to eliminate confirmation bias, it is guaranteed that your ego will be put to the test. When this happens, remember you do not know everything, and even when you are 100 years old, you will still have lessons to learn about life. Practice humility when it comes to listening to others. We were given only 1 mouth, but 2 ears. Listen twice as much as you speak and you will be well on your way to expanding your mind.

Advertising

3. Think For Yourself

This is also a much-needed quality in today’s world. The internet is full of information, social media is full of opinions, and we are so busy that we end up quoting someone else’s thoughts without making sure we agree with what we are quoting. Think for yourself. Do not depend solely on what people are telling you — find out for yourself. If you have to do some thorough research, do it — you will be better off for it. It may mean you will need to tell someone you can’t give an answer right away because you need to take some time to think it over, or it may mean you will never have an answer to a problem. People who expand their minds know that some questions just don’t have answers.

4. If You Want To Expand Your Mind, You Must Be OK With Disagreements

Have you ever heard the phrase “devil’s advocate?” If a person believes something, a friend might come along and test those beliefs by asking pointed questions or making strong statements about the subject, usually from the opposing standpoint. If the person really knows their stuff, this does not pose a threat — it gives them a chance to really show how much they know about the topic! But for others who have not been thinking for themselves, someone playing devil’s advocate really points out the lack of an expanded mind. This point goes hand in hand with points 1and 2; be humble enough to seek out disagreements and don’t be afraid of opposing viewpoints. You can learn a lot from someone who disagrees with you. Arguing and fighting are never good ways to expand your way of thinking, but debate is a great way to exercise your brain “muscles.”

Advertising

5. Ask Good Questions

Remember when your teacher told you the only dumb question is an unasked question? That was true then, but you are older now, and if you want to expand your mind, you must not only ask good questions, but better questions. A good question is “what do you believe about this topic?”. A better question is “why do you believe this?” or “what led you to believe this?”. Asking questions that lead to deeper thought and conversation will help you to broaden your way of thinking.

6. Keep Information Channels Open

If you want to expand your mind, don’t close yourself off from new information. If philosophers, astronomers, and scientists had been closed to new information, we would still believe the world is flat, we wouldn’t know about gravity, and we would have no cures for any diseases. Keeping yourself open doesn’t mean following every new idea that comes along; it simply means being humble enough to know that no matter how much we learn, there is still room for more!

Advertising

More by this author

12 Quick And Safe Ways To Get Rid Of A Stye Science Unlocks The Secret To Why Introverts Prefer Alone Time To Socializing Mother And Daughter: A Long-Awaited Reunion After 82 Years 8 Habits Of People Who Look Younger Than Their Actual Age Why Women Suffer From Insomnia More Often Than Men (And Ways To Help!)

Trending in Productivity

1 10 Practical Ways to Improve Time Management Skills 2 The Ultimate Morning Routine for Success of Highly Successful People 3 10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful 4 Powerful Daily Routine Examples for a Healthier Life 5 How to Increase Willpower and Be Mentally Tough

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

Advertising

I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

Advertising

My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

Advertising

Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

Advertising

Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

Read Next