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Video Games And Your Child’s Health: Surprising Results From New Study

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Video Games And Your Child’s Health: Surprising Results From New Study

Do you feel that video games are bad for your children, yet they absolutely love them? Are you a bad parent for letting them play video games? Well, a new study says you aren’t. In fact, recent data suggests playing video games could actually have positive effects.

Research Says Positive Correlation May Exist

Researchers at Columbia University and Paris Descartes University have been studying the association between the average time spent playing video games and the mental health, cognition, and social skills of young children.

The study adjusted for a multitude of factors, including gender, number of kids, and age. After reviewing the results, the research team identified that a high usage of video games typically means a child has 1.75 times the chances of “optimum intellectual capacity.” Additionally, that same child has 1.88 times the odds of “high general competence in school.”

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Even more importantly, the study wasn’t able to identify any significant negative impacts on mental health (as reported by the child, parents, or teachers).

“Video game playing is often a collaborative leisure time activity for school-aged children. These results indicate that children who frequently play video games may be socially cohesive with peers and integrated into the school community,” said Katherine M. Keyes, PhD, one of the study’s primary authors. “We caution against over interpretation, however, as setting limits on screen usage remains an important component of parental responsibility as an overall strategy for student success.”

Keyes went on to add that it’s the children who don’t engage with their friends and peers around gaming that are more at risk for developing problems. In other words, if children are exposed to the right games and put in social gaming situations, everything is generally fine. It’s when they become secluded and distanced from their peers that issues seem to arise.

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Encouraging Healthy Gaming Behaviors In Kids

With this new research in mind, it shouldn’t be a parent’s goal to completely eliminate all video game usage. Instead, parents should be focused on encouraging healthy social gaming behaviors.

If children are playing games on a dedicated video game console, parents should be referencing a source like Common Sense Media, which helps them set guidelines. If children are playing online games, choosing a safe and friendly platform, such as Poptropica, is much preferred over giving them free reign to surf the web.

As previously mentioned, the key is to get children involved with others. Social gameplay gives kids a common tool for conversation and bonding, whereas isolated gameplay encourages children to function in an alternative universe that is neither healthy nor educational.

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Despite the study’s results, Keyes wants parents to be careful with the takeaway.

“I want to be sure that we’re not suggesting in this study that parents should let kids play unlimited video games because it’s good for their mental health. That’s not what we’re saying.”

High volume video game playing certainly isn’t healthy, if for no other reason than it encourages a sedentary lifestyle. However, if children are playing just 30 or 40 minutes of video games each day, there’s no data to suggest it’ll have a negative cognitive impact. In fact, if you go by this study, it may have a positive impact.

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Let Children Play

Video game usage among children is all about balance. Are the children also spending time playing outside, communicating with friends, and eating healthy? Are their grades on par with their peers? If children seem to be checking out on all other fronts, don’t automatically assume that video games are having a negative effect. It’s possible that these short gaming sessions with friends are actually keeping them engaged.

Featured photo credit: Seth Werkheiser via flic.kr

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Anna Johansson

Anna specializes in entrepreneurship, technology, and social media trends.

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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