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How To Enjoy Green Tea By Reducing Caffeine In It

How To Enjoy Green Tea By Reducing Caffeine In It

Green tea originates from China and Japan and has been drunk there for hundreds of years, valued for its taste as much as for its health benefits.  One thing that leads people to hesitate before diving into that cup of green tea is that they are afraid of the amount of caffeine it contains.  There are, however, ways to reduce this while still enjoying your favorite drink!

A Look at Caffeinated Drinks

To give you an idea of where green tea stands in regard to caffeine, it is good to compare it to other caffeinated drinks. You might be surprised at how much of a difference there is!

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So here’s where green tea stands in relation to other kinds of teas as well as coffee and cola:

  • Green tea (1 cup) = 25mg (though this can vary)
  • Black tea (1 cup) = 16-25 mg
  • White tea (1 cup) = 6-25mg
  • Coffee (1 cup) = 100-150mg
  • Cola (1 can) = 30-60mg

Generally speaking, green tea is going to give you less caffeine than colas and coffees or coffee-based drinks. But it might come as a surprise to learn that even different brands of green tea can have a different caffeine content.  For instance, Stash Green Tea clocks in at only 7.6mg per cup, but Lipton more than doubles that amount at 16.4 mg and Peet’s is even stronger at 33.4 mg.

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Tips for Cutting Down on Caffeine in Green Tea

If you are really concerned about the amount of caffeine in your green tea, there are some ways that you can cut down on it without sacrificing quality or flavor. Here are some general ideas:

  • Read your labels.  As noted above, the brand you buy can make a big difference in regard to green tea caffeine levels.
  • Keep L-theanine in mind.  Green tea is a rich source of L-theanine. Why is this important?  This amino acid acts as caffeine antagonist: in other words, rather than revving up your central nervous system like caffeine does, L-theanine calms it down, thus counter-acting the caffeine’s affects. This is probably why green tea drinkers report feeling energized but not jittery after their morning cup. Drinking your green tea while it is hot means that the L-theanine will have more of an effect.
  • Know the type of tea you are drinking. Brand names are not the only issue here.  It is also good to know what type of green tea your are drinking.  Teas like matcha and gyokura green teas are highest in caffeine, while hougicha tea ranks near the bottom. Again, reading your labels can help you decide which type of green tea to opt for.
  • Another good way to reduce the caffeine in your tea is to infuse the leaves for around 45 seconds, throw that water out, then start again with a fresh cup of hot water.  This second infusion will not have as much caffeine as the first.
  • Consider buying a good decaffeinated green tea. On average, this will have between 4 and 10mg of caffeine per serving. But be careful: read the label to make sure that your green tea has been de-caffeinated naturally through effervescence, of the use of carbonated water.  Otherwise, it might have been decaffeinated with a chemical solvent called ethyl acetate — and this is not something you want to be drinking up.

Keep in Mind that Caffeine’s Not all Bad!

Before you get too wild about cutting down on the caffeine in green tea, though, keep in mind that it is not the scapegoat that many doctors once thought it was.  It used to be that physicians would recommend cutting caffeine out of the diet for a wide variety of medical conditions, but later research has proven that this is not always the best thing to do.

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As a matter of fact, there are some definite health benefits to caffeine: it has been shown to help protect the neurons of the brain from serious degenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and it has also shown to be protective against certain forms of cancer, particularly of the breast, bladder and colon. Catechins — the best known of which is EGCG — have been shown to boost the metabolism and make it easier for the body to burn fat. Studies have also shown that it can help prevent heart disease. In short, there are some great reasons to consider allowing at least some caffeine into your diet: 300mg is the recommended daily allowance for an adult; this drops down to 200mg daily for pregnant women.

Tea and Coffee Infographic

To get a better visual on the comparisons between coffee and tea in regard to caffeine — as well as the health benefits it can bring you — check out the infographic below from courtesy of Greatist.com:

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Why-Coffee-and-Tea-are-Amazing-for-You

    So whether you are trying to cut down on caffeine or simply enjoy one of the healthiest drinks on the planet, green tea is something you should definitely try to work into your daily routine!

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    Brian Wu

    Health Writer, Author

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    Last Updated on June 13, 2019

    5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

    5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

    Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

    You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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    1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

    It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

    Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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    2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

    If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

    3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

    If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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    4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

    A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

    5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

    If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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    Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

    Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

    Reference

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