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15 Quotes From 15 Inspiring Female Artists

15 Quotes From 15 Inspiring Female Artists

A true list of all the great female artists who inspire us is endless. Throughout the centuries, the range of dancers, painters, writers, activists, and performers that have forged a path for others is inspiring in itself, especially given that many were also mothers, wives, and workers fighting for equal rights. Without them, we would not have the freedom we have today. Without their expression, and their fight to use this expression freely, we would not exist as we do today.

Here is a list of 15 exceptional females who have done exceptional work in their fields. The timespan of these quotes ranges over the last century. Some of these women were the wives and partners of famous men, but all are powerful, fabulous, and utterly individual. These women made no excuses for themselves or their work. They proceeded with courage, determination, and pride, often in the face of obstruction. Let their wise words inspire your day.

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15 Quotes From 15 Inspiring Female Artists

  1. “Where does it all lead? What will become of us? These were our young questions, and young answers were revealed. It leads to each other. We become ourselves.” — Writer and performer Patti Smith, from her novel Just Kids.
  2. “It is the mainspring of life, courage. And courage has many faces.” – Italian writer and reporter, Oriana Fallaci.
  3. “I’ve had 72 absolutely flaming years. It (the illness) doesn’t bother me at all because, you know, love, when you’ve lived like I have, you’ve done it all. I put all my effort into living.” — Artist Vali Myers, The Witch of Positano.
  4. “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” — Author Anais Nin.
  5. “Happiness comes from the full understanding of your own being.” — Serbian performance artist Marina Abramovic.
  6. “I felt very vulnerable singing, ‘I’m through hanging around all of the boys in town.’ It was difficult for me. I couldn’t stand there and sing the words. I felt I wasn’t being interesting. I wanted to also perform and entertain or transport people. I wanted other levels. So I went out and got a school uniform and probably Vince got suspenders and stockings. That freed me, and then everything changed.” – Singer Chrissy Amphlett, on finding strength in her first performance as lead singer of the Australian rock band The Divinyls.
  7. “Think of the magic of that foot, comparatively small, upon which your whole weight rests. It’s a miracle, and the dance is a celebration of that miracle.” — American modern dancer and choreographer Martha Graham.
  8. “Nobody has ever measured, not even poets, how much the heart can hold.” — Writer, dancer, and queen of the jazz era, Zelda Fitzgerald.
  9. “You were once wild here. Don’t let them tame you.” — Pioneer of modern dance, Isadora Duncan.
  10. “Find something you really love doing and mix it with something you really care about. That’s why I’ve had such longevity as an artist. I really, really care about ending violence against women, and I really, really love playing music. It’s super enjoyable!” — Punk singer and activist Kathleen Hanna.
  11. “I want to be a living work of art.” — Italian heiress, artist, and muse, the Marchesa Luisa Casati.
  12. “Early in life I came to understand that I was the only person who could protect my own interests, and that, being alone, I must cultivate survivor skills and turn weaknesses into strengths.” — Australian author, foreign correspondent, and refugee activist Jill Jolliffe.
  13. “Use your faults, use your defects; then you’re going to be a star.” — The great singer Edith Piaf.
  14. “Beauty is only skin deep, but ugly goes clean to the bone.”  — Writer Dorothy Parker.
  15. “Time heals, after all — although the clock that marks that kind of time has no hands.” — American author and artist Suze Rotolo.

Featured photo credit: Morguefile via mrg.bz

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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