Advertising
Advertising

4 Ways To Overcome Notification Fatigue

4 Ways To Overcome Notification Fatigue

If you are one of the 92% of Americans who have a cell phone, you’re probably receiving constant notifications from mail, texts, tweets, and news feeds.  Over time, the buzz in your pocket, the silly ring tone, and the incessant need to check for messages can really start to take their toll on both you, and those around you. I would argue that there are now so many notifications with limited utility and I, for one, have decided to take a stand.

I will no longer accept just in time notifications unless they are from one of a select group of people I deeply care about. These people have been added to my VIP list that includes my spouse, my kids, my boss, and finally the other members of my executive team. Everybody else will be covered in an hourly scan of my messages and responded to with an appropriate priority.

Advertising

This practice became my new norm when I found I could not keep up with the sheer number of notifications my iPhone was bombarding me with. At some parts of the day, the rate was as high as one event per minute. I was having trouble getting time to work on goals that required concentrated thought.

Here are four huge negative outcomes from the notification epidemic.

Advertising

Endless Notification Equals Endless Distraction

It’s wonderful to know what’s going on in our world but it’s also incredibly hard to focus if your phone is beeping or vibrating every few seconds. When this becomes the new normal, a state I call “endless distraction” settles in. An email arrives, you process it. A tweet comes in, you read it. All of this shortens your attention span to the point where you cannot perform long-term work and notification fatigue sets in.

Notification Stimulus Leads to Increased Stress

There are countless studies that show us constant stimulus leads to overload, and overload leads to stress. If taken to the extreme, constant stimulus has another name: torture.

Advertising

You may think that turning off notifications will lead to more stress because you might miss an urgent message from your boss or spouse. Most devices have the concepts of VIPs (important individuals whose mails or texts will show up in real time whilst silencing the maddening crowd). If used correctly, this can greatly reduce the amount of stimulus you are receiving.

Stress and Distraction Reduce Performance

Stress and distraction are a recipe for decreased performance due to cognitive overload and muddied thinking. It is virtually impossible to give a topic adequate thought if you are working from moment to moment. Consequently, your decision making capability can take a real hit as well. This is a manifestation of accommodation (a key concept in neural biology), where the response of biological entity decreases with constant stimulus over time.

Advertising

Notifications Kill Authenticity

Let’s face it, one of the greatest social faux pas of all time is having a conversation and trying to attend to notifications at the same time. The person across the table feels slighted by your inability to give them adequate attention and perceives this as a lack of authenticity on your part. Over time, this leads to decreased trust and a weakened relationship.

Gadgets such as Apple watches can be perceived as being even less authentic. Not only does the act of looking at your watch signal disinterest, it also suggests that maybe this meeting should be over. Since the other person may not know about your latest gadget, it’s easy for them to take offense and see you as being inauthentic.

So What Should I do?

For true notification addicts I recommend the following strategy.

  1. Start by turning off each and every notification on your phone.
  2. Create a VIP list of people who you would want to interrupt you for emergencies. Allow them to send messages and emails so you can be sure they’ll be able to contact you.
  3. Be consistent. Don’t add anybody else to the list.
  4. Set a calendar reminder to check your messages every one to two hours and religiously stick to it so you are covering all the messages you could potentially miss.
  5. You are effectively fighting a form of addiction or conditioned response. Reward yourself for sticking with it!

Featured photo credit: http://albumarium.com/ via albumarium.com

More by this author

Colin Rhodes

Chief Technology Officer

travel 12 Dos and Don’ts of Air Travel For Conscientious Travellers 5 Ways To Have A More Productive Doctor’s Visit Life Secrets of a Barista Why You Should Be Tracking Your Health in a Personal Health Record agreeement Career Hints – 5 ways to overcome a disagreement with your supervisor

Trending in Technology

1 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 2 7 Clever Goal Tracker Apps to Make the Most of Your Business in 2019 3 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance 4 18 Best Time Management Apps and Tools (2019 Updated) 5 16 Less Known Gmail Hacks That Will Super Boost Your Productivity

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

Advertising

     

    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

      Advertising

      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

        Advertising

          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

            Advertising

            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

            Read Next