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Science Says Keeping a Dream Diary Can Make Us More Creative

Science Says Keeping a Dream Diary Can Make Us More Creative

The very act of recording a dream is fascinating. It improves your awareness of the dream state, making it easier to recall dreams and work with them. If you are wondering why you should even bother recalling a dream, well, dreams have been responsible for some major creative and scientific discoveries in human history.

In 1965, Paul McCartney of the legendary pop group The Beatles composed the entire melody for the hit acoustic song Yesterday in a dream. It came back to him in its entirety when he woke up and he quickly replicated the song on his piano, asking his family and friends if they had ever heard it before. He was initially worried that he was replicating someone else’s work.

Similarly, Niels Bohr, the father of quantum mechanics, often spoke of the inspirational dream that led to his most revolutionary discovery of the structure of the atom. Even Albert Einstein, famous for his genius insights, credited many of those insights to his dreams. “Einstein’s Dreams” is a fascinating read about the collage of stories Einstein dreamed in 1905 on the brink of his breakthrough discoveries.

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When you start to successfully capture dreams and begin to keep a dream diary, the following are some wonderful benefits you can expect:

1. Keeping a dream diary provides us a record.

Dreams are quite fleeting. Most dreams get lost shortly after we have them. Often you won’t remember a dream after only a few hours, or a few days at most. Why allow yourself to forget all your dreams forever when you can keep them on record? Keeping a dream diary ensures your dreams are safely recorded and you can go back to them whenever you want in future.

2. Keeping a dream diary can inspire creativity.

Dreams are also powerful tools for creative inspiration. When you read your dream diary and recall dreams, you engage different parts of the brain and trigger your mind to think in a totally different way that you might not otherwise have been able to do. That’s almost always a good thing for getting your creative juices moving, especially when you’ve hit a creative mental block.

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3. Keeping a dream diary can lead to brilliant discoveries.

As already mentioned, who knows what brilliant insights or discoveries are waiting to be unearthed in your dreams. One dream can result in a brilliant discovery or invention that alters not just your world or the world of your loved ones, but also the course of the whole world in general.

4. Keeping a dream diary allows us to appreciate our own mental growth.

Being able to look back on a dream later and think, “Ah, interesting” or “Geez, that was a weird dream” can be a lot of fun, not to mention eye-opening. It could give you an appreciation of your own mental growth a few years into the future looking back and seeing where your mind was compared to where your mind is at currently. For many people, this is enough reason in itself to keep a dream diary.

5. Keeping a dream diary allows us to observe our sub-conscious.

The beauty of keeping a dream diary is that when you read through it, dreams come flooding back into memory. You see details of your subconscious thoughts vividly all over again, meaning you can analyze what was/is going on in your subconscious mind. Even if you are not keen on analyzing your dreams, knowing what your deepest thoughts are is oftentimes quite enlightening. And besides, the simple act of writing down dreams can be therapeutic too, just like keeping a regular diary.

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Conclusion: Dreams are not the meaningless, corrupt or delusional fantasies some make them out to be

Psychologists no longer dismiss dreams as mere fantasies or random neurons firing. Today they recognize dreams as an ongoing thought process that happens while we are asleep. That is why it is a great idea to journal your dreams. If you don’t journal your dreams, you might never know what profound thoughts are happening while you are asleep, and what impact those thoughts might have on your waking life.

Admittedly, though, oftentimes when we want to remember dreams all we have when we wake up in the morning is a vague recollection of a place or the lingering feeling of being upset. It doesn’t seem worth writing down.

If you have trouble remembering dreams, be patient with yourself. Putting too much pressure on yourself to dream or having high expectations to recall dreams will only exasperate the situation and leave you feeling more disappointed or frustrated.

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Dreams are erratic. They will come around in their own sweet time. And when they do come, try lucid anchoring to capture them.

Try this lucid anchoring exercise to capture your dreams

Lucid anchoring comes from the fascinating branch of psychology called Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP). Just before you fall asleep, pick an item that you can see clearly from your bed. It can be a prominent picture hung on the wall, for example. This will be your anchor.

Look at this picture when you go to sleep, wake up during the night and first thing in the morning. When you look at the picture say to yourself, “I will remember my dreams.” The phrase acts as a trigger for your unconscious brain to associate the picture with remembering dreams. It’s a statement of intent that informs your mind to focus on your dreams and remember them.

Look at that picture multiple times each night to improve the odds of remembering dreams. It’s also advisable to have on hand a book light or pen with a light attached for recording the most vivid images or emotions from a dream right in the middle of the night upon awakening. Don’t trust you’ll remember your dream in the morning—many amazing dreams and brilliant ideas are lost with that assumption.

Featured photo credit: Eugenio Marongiu via shutterstock.com

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David K. William

David is a publisher and entrepreneur who tries to help professionals grow their business and careers, and gives advice for entrepreneurs.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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