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10 Reasons Why Your Dad Doesn’t Actually Want Your Father’s Day Gift

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10 Reasons Why Your Dad Doesn’t Actually Want Your Father’s Day Gift

Planning to gift your dad flashy things like neckties, football tickets, world’s best dad mugs, or a bottle of his favourite alcohol this Father’s Day? Well, you might have to drop the idea of surprising him. Forget gift shop promotions. Go for a real present that he actually wants. After all, it’s his day; shouldn’t he get to celebrate on his terms?

A recent survey by Deal News shed light on the fact that catching up over a cup of coffee, talking on the phone, playing a video game together, or a hug is more valued by dads than any sort of material gift.

Instead of scouring different websites and inundating yourself with ads espousing the perfect Father’s Day gift, consider the things that represent the close bond in your relationship with him this year. Here are a few reasons why most dads would rather skip gifts on Father’s Day.

1. Because he doesn’t want you to burn your budget

No surprises here. An invite to an expensive restaurant or a 10-dollar greeting card from one of the hippest places in town is not what most dads want. They would prefer a handmade card or a cheap coffee date. They value shared time more than material possessions.

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2. Because he is not fond of surprises

Men, in general, and fathers in particular, do not like surprises. They prefer to plan everything ahead of time so that they know exactly what is going to happen and when. Remember that they prefer to have control over the situation before you start planning a big surprise for Father’s Day. Think back to the times you’ve surprised dad with unpleasant moments; that fender bender, a failing grade on a report card, or an unpopular personal decision.

Give him control over the day, or at least inform him of your plans ahead of time!

3. Because he values family time more

Research has shown that two-fifths of dads feel that spending quality time with their families on a holiday is worth far more than a wrapped gift, sporting event ticket, or new fashion accessory.

4. Because expensive gadgets are often of no use to him

Often, children present their fathers with expensive, trendy gadgets for Father’s Day.

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While these gadgets may seem necessary to you at the time, your dad might think otherwise. Even though some gizmos can be useful, most usually end up at the back of some shelf or drawer.

Children should consider asking before buying electronics for their fathers. This way, you ensure that your purchase will be useful to dad, rather than just a waste of money.

 5. Because he prefers to be acknowledged verbally

Today’s dads don’t want their kids to feel indebted to them. All the things they did to provide a good life for their family were due to the responsibility they feel they have as a father.

But that doesn’t mean fathers don’t want to hear about how their sacrifices impacted you personally. According to Eckhart Tolle, “Acknowledging the good that you already have in your life is the foundation for all abundance.” This Father’s Day, your dad would love to hear your thoughts on how he impacted your life. Sharing a fond memory and creating new ones is what dad loves most.

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6. Because a small thing like a phone call is enough to tell him you care

Sometimes, it’s hard to believe that a phone call can say it all. Could a phone call really replace an expensive gift? Well, in your dad’s universe, a meaningful phone call beats an expensive gift every time.

7. Because he is a true believer in practicality

Have you ever asked your dad: “What do you want for Father’s Day?”

A pair of socks or underpants were probably pretty high on his list. Dads love spending money on things that are useful to them, regardless of it being an everyday thing.

8. Because he still thinks of you as a child

While you might feel all grown up, your dad still sees you through the lens of a loving parent. That’s one reason some dads actually give their children a present on Father’s Day. It’s about looking after a child and giving them every opportunity in life.

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9. Because he wants appreciation in the truest sense

The stereotypical father is emotionally hardened and stern. That tough exterior is covering a warm and sensitive dad that’s emotionally attached to his kids.

Take the opportunity this Father’s Day to really open up and share with your dad how he makes you feel. Talk about the good times, the bad times, and just be emotionally honest. It’s okay to let your guard down for 24 hours out of the year. Seriously, he’ll love it.

10. Because he believes every day is Father’s Day

It might just be that your father does not believe in the idea of a special day for dads. For him, every day might be Father’s Day. He might prefer that you show your gratitude year-round with something more practical, like performing well in school or helping out around the house.

Don’t be alarmed if his response to your gift on Father’s Day is lukewarm. He’s proud to be your dad, and he celebrates it in his own special way every day. Let’s all raise a toast to the dads out there that make the world a better place!

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Featured photo credit: kumasi via flickr.com

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Ahmed Raza

CEO of Samurais.co

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Last Updated on November 22, 2021

Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

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Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

Thanksgiving, a day of pure gluttony, football, and possible uncomfortable situations with family members that you may or may not like. Oh, yeah, and the whole “know and reflect on what it is to be thankful and grateful.”

During the holiday season many people forget what this time of year is bout and are too worried about getting the “early-bird” deals on Black Friday and making sure that they have the perfect gifts for their loved ones. I am sort of a “Grinch” when it comes to the holiday season, mostly because of that mentality by many of the poeple around me.

But instead of being grinch-like this holiday season, I decided to simplify things and get back to what this time of year is actually is about; being thankful for what I have and what I can give.

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Simplify

I’m not a “minimalist” in any real sense, but in the last few months the talks of Patrick Rhone and others have got me to rethink my stance. Can you really have too much stuff?

Absolutely.

And with all that stuff comes the burden and the weight of it on your back.

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If you feel that the things around you are out of control, maybe it’s time to simplify and be thankful and grateful for what you have and use. Here are a few things that you can do to simplify:

  • You know those gadgets in the drawer that you said you were going to sell? Well, time to get the listing on eBay and sell them. Or, send them to a place like Gazelle. Even if they are old and won’t get money, you can at least recycle them.
  • Get rid of things you don’t need. Like old books, clothes, tools, etc. Have something that’s been laying around forever with no use? Donate it to a charity or church. If you aren’t using it, someone else could be.
  • Find your productivity tools and stick with them. Use tools and gadgets that serve multiple purposes so you can simplify your tool set.

Be Mindful

You don’t have to be a master Buddhist or meditator to be mindful (although, it can definitely help). Being mindful comes down to being cognizant of the present and not keeping yourself in the past or future. It’s about living in the moment and being aware of yourself and everything around you. It’s just being.

Without getting too “California” on you, it is super important to be mindful during the holiday rush. Rather than worrying about the things that you forgot at your house on the way to relatives or thinking about the next stop in your endless holiday travels, just breath and think about what you are currently doing.

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Spend the time with your family and friends and don’t crush the moment. Try not to concentrate so hard on getting the perfect photo of the “awesome moment” of the day and actually miss the awesome moment.

Being mindful over the holidays will help you be with your families, friends, and yourself allowing you to enjoy your time.

Reflect

As the year is coming to a close (yes, it really is that close!) it’s a great time to start reflecting on what you have accomplished and what you haven’t. Within the next few weeks we will have a more throrough reflection article here at Lifehack.org, but reflecting every now and then over your holiday break is a great way to see where you have been doing well in your life and where you need to improve.

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Reflection shouldn’t be used to “get down” on yourself. Reflection should be used to take an honset inventory of what you have accomplished, how you handeled situations, and what you can do better. If you journal everyday (a daily form of reflection) it may be a good time to start going over some of the things that you have written and start to put together a year’s end journal entry. I mean, how else will you write your autobiography?

But, seriously, reflecting on yourself makes you aware of your successes and faults and helps you plan and make goals for the coming year. It makes you a better person.

So, while you are stuffing your face with bird, stuffing, and mashed taters’, remember that the holidays are much more than the superficial things. Use this holiday to become a better person.

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Featured photo credit: Libby Penner via unsplash.com

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