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I Live Off-The-Grid In A House-Bus

I Live Off-The-Grid In A House-Bus
The first question people ask me when I tell them that I live off-the-grid in a house-bus/mud brick home is: What about wifi? Does that mean you don’t have the internet?
My answer is definitely no, I have the internet because I run my business from home. The internet and the TV are some of the few luxuries we have.
Everything else is fully self-sustainable and natural.
It is seriously exciting and so eye-opening, living like a hippie off-the-grid. Waking up when the sun comes up, to the sound of nature and hearing nothing but silence for miles.
Last year my partner and I made the shift. I wasn’t prepared for the move, but I did it anyway. What the shift has bought about is more than just downshifting externally, but internal downshifting.
I won’t lie, it’s been hard living off-the-grid, it does involve its fair share of work.
We don’t have free running electricity (we are getting solar soon), but right now we use a generator. So, if you want a cup of coffee you have to start the generator to turn on the electricity. You can’t have too many things plugged in at any one time, so make sure you are using your electricity wisely.
I light the fire in the winter around 3:00pm- 4:00pm because it’s so cold. Sometimes I chop the wood because it doesn’t fit into the fire.
My life is simple but it does involve work, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.
I feel blessed now to be able to live the life that so many people yearn for, but it wasn’t easy. Here are three of my biggest lessons that I have learned by living off-the-grid in a house-bus.

1. Don’t try and fit your life into a perfect box

For the first six months I was constantly projecting myself into the past, comparing how things were and wondering why it wasn’t as easy as before. When I started to let this go, and I stopped trying to fit my life into a box of what I think it should be, I could allow my life to be exactly as it is and enjoy the present moment.

2. Being busy doesn’t mean you’re going places.

When I look back on my life before I moved off-the-grid, I was extremely busy with things that didn’t add value to my life, my relationships or myself. Now, I can see that life isn’t about doing more, having more, or being more, but being selective and grateful for the things that you do have. Doing or having more, isn’t better.

3. The relationships you have matter more than you think.

I spend large amounts of time by myself now, I couldn’t have done that before I moved here. My relationship with myself is the most important relationship that I have. It’s important that I nurture and look after me. When I’m happy my world is a pleasant place to be in, when I’m miserable, my world is miserable. The best thing you can do for yourself is look after the relationship that you have with yourself, become your own best friend, lover, and even coach.

Living off-the-grid didn’t create a simple life automatically; creating a simple life is about a mindset shift more than a move. What living off-the-grid has ultimately taught me, is that life is all about choice- at every moment we can choose how we want to live, feel, and be, in that moment.

My best advice for anyone thinking about moving off-the-grid is this…
It won’t be anything like what you imagine it to be, it will be better.
My life is perfect, I don’t pay rent or have a mortgage, and I don’t have huge stresses in my life. I understand the value of small things and see the interconnectedness of all things. I feel like I am always on holiday, always living what I want to do now and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Featured photo credit: Sarah Liddle/ I am the original owner of this image. via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

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