Advertising
Advertising

6 Ways Fearless and Ambitious Entrepreneurs Gain Rapid Business Growth

6 Ways Fearless and Ambitious Entrepreneurs Gain Rapid Business Growth

As an entrepreneur, you’ve probably started your business dreaming of a continuous flow of money and the freedom to set your own hours and find success on your own terms. While these dreams aren’t impossible, they definitely are hard to realize, especially if you’re just starting out on your journey. However, the rewards you end up reaping will end up being completely worth it in the long run.

As a budding entrepreneur, you need to:

1. Join the competition

Don’t be afraid to dive right in. Make yourself known in your industry, even if on a small scale. This is not to say you want to start out thinking you can put other companies out of business — or even that that’s what you should aim to do at all. Rather, you should use your competitors’ successes as motivation to grow your own company from the ground up.

Advertising

You should also look to the established professionals within your industry and see them as the mentors they are. Many of them will be more than willing to help you get started on the right path.

2. Hire the right people

You’re not going to be able to run your company by yourself. You want to hire competent and forward-thinking individuals who are willing to work toward a common goal. While you don’t want to make exorbitant promises from the get-go, you want to make it clear that their efforts today will pay off in dividends tomorrow.

You want people who are motivated by more than just the almighty dollar working for you. You want the ones who understand your vision and will stop at nothing to see it come to life.

Advertising

3. Reduce your risks

Starting a business is a huge risk in the first place. And, believe it or not, getting started too quickly can end up coming back to bite you immediately.

As your business starts to grow, be careful not to take on too much. You don’t want your customers and clientele to get the impression that you’re unreliable. While you should never turn away a customer willing to pay for your services, if you’re unable to cater to their needs right away make sure they understand this, and that the only reason there may be a slight hold up is that you want to provide them with the best product or service possible.

4. Be adaptable

If you haven’t noticed by now, trends change on an almost daily basis. Because of this, your business needs to be able to constantly adapt to the needs of your customers. While you don’t want to sacrifice your integrity just to make a quick sale, you do want to listen to your customers’ advice and criticisms.

Advertising

You’re almost certainly going to make mistakes along the way to success. But if you don’t learn from them, you’ll never reach the goals you’ve set for yourself.

5. Focus on your customers

Like I just said, your business only exists because your customers do. But your company isn’t unique (at least not yet). Your audience can easily find someone else offering the same service or product as you. What keeps them loyal to your company is the personal touch you put into your business. Don’t settle for knowing what your customers want. Reach out to them as human beings. Create a community of like-minded individuals who share their ideas freely.

Not only will this give you an idea of how to move forward with your business, but it will show your customers that you truly care about them and want to provide them with exceptional service.

Advertising

6. Think ahead

This goes along with being adaptable. Like I said, you always want to be changing with the demands of your customers. But you shouldn’t be reactive in this prospect.

You need to proactively grow as a company, and never settle where you currently are. Imagine if Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg had just stopped working once they made their first million. Not only would they not have nearly as much as they do now, but Microsoft and Facebook would never have grown to the omnipresent entities they currently are.

Once you’ve reached one goal within your company, you should immediately start looking ahead to the next milestone on your path.

Featured photo credit: Child Entrepreneur Lemonade Stand 50 Cents Each Qiqi Lourdie June 24, 20111 / Steven Depolo via farm7.staticflickr.com

More by this author

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience 20 Little Signs You’ve Found The One 8 Signs of a Man Who Will Never Ever Stop Loving You 8 Things To Remember When Dating Someone With A Guarded Heart 14 Signs You’re Not Drinking Enough Water

Trending in Entrepreneur

1 Advice for Entrepreneurs: How To Find A Mentor Worth Listening To 2 How to Be a Successful Businessman (The Complete Guide) 3 How to Brand Yourself and Make Your Business Stand Out 4 How to Start a Company from Scratch (A Step-By-Step Guide) 5 15 Best Books for Entrepreneurs to Start Reading Right Now

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

Advertising

What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

Advertising

Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

Advertising

How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

Advertising

  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next