Advertising
Advertising

17 Books With Breathtaking Covers That You Need To Know

17 Books With Breathtaking Covers That You Need To Know

For book lovers, there’s nothing more important than a well-crafted story and a memorable plot. For book collectors however, there’s an added preference and affinity for beautiful covers that long to be touched. Some book covers draw you in and mesmerize you, regardless of the actual content. Going through my own collection and scouring the internet for favorites, I’ve listed below some incredible book covers that will hopefully arouse some curiosity or sheer appreciation.

1. Siddharta – by Hermann Hesse

siddha

    The vibrant hue and minimalist design of this book is aligned to the story it contains. Siddharta is a page-turner, despite being a very deep, spiritual book that will leave you reeling and thinking.

    2. Big Magic – by Elizabeth Gilbert

    bm

      The colors! The title! So much promise. A great book by the author of Eat, Pray, Love, ideal for the creative archetype or creative-wannabes. Elizabeth Gilbert expands on her own knowledge and encourages others through the beauty and struggle of the creative process.

      3. Tampa – by Alyssa Nutting

      51eHRvtC+YL

        Besides the ingenious symbolism behind the flesh-colored button slit, this is a phenomenal book for fiction lovers that is hard to digest but worth every single moment of discomfort.

        Advertising

        4. The Lost Girls – by Jennifer Baggett, Holly C. Corbett, Amanda Pressner

        41ZUJQ678dL

          If only for the sake of visualizing myself on some exotic beach that largely resembles my screensaver, I couldn’t resist purchasing this gem of a travel book. Perfect for female travelers, the story of The Lost Girls is sure to evoke some serious wanderlust.

          5. Zen Pencils, Volume Two – by Gavin Aung Than

          51WJr1ANGCL

            Stumbling upon the eponymous blog name is a fond memory of mine. The book which has high-definition inspirational comics never fail to make me feel grateful and motivated. This book includes a free poster and makes for a wonderful gift for almost anyone. I can’t recommend it enough.

            6. Aleph – by Paulo Coelho

            41cb9IgkvtL

              Beyond stating the obvious, which is that Paulo Coelho writes meaningful books, that leading path in the water is intriguing and aweworthy. An insightful look into karmic justice based on the memories of the author’s past life.

              7. Perfect Strangers – by Tasmina Perry

              Advertising

              51XrawDuUDL

                Diving into a Tasmina Perry book is the mental equivalent of sinking your toes into flawless sand on the deserted beach of your dreams on a perfect day. Her writing is immaculate and the characters are always intricately woven into a heavy and fantastic net that will leave you exuberant yet flabbergasted by the last page. Her novels are a staple in my carry-on and are always welcome on my bookshelf, also because of their beautiful covers.

                8. Paris Letters – by Janice MacLeod

                51KFIWp2tHL

                  This book cover doubles as a post card, if you’re ever in a bind. A beautiful, romantic and brave story about a woman who leaves everything up to chance and gains a rather poetic adventure in Paris.

                  9. Love Poems – by Pablo Neruda

                  71xbWxTKEfL

                    The delicate, golden calligraphy. The dainty pastel pink book that could fit into your hand or pocket. Poetry lovers, rejoice. Pablo Neruda will revive the coldest hearts with his honeyed words about the fondest sentiment of all.

                    10. Illustrated Complete Works of Shakespeare – by William Shakespeare

                    61LmWNSGOML__SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

                      Beware, this is a very heavy encyclopedia loaded with all – and I do mean all – of Shakespeare’s plays, sonnets, poems. It’s a beautiful collection for fans of classic literature or party snobs who want to appear intelligent and cultured and of course for fans of beautiful book covers.

                      Advertising

                      11. A piece of cake – by Cupcake Brown

                      61L-FnuWaAL

                        Don’t let the gorgeous throw of colorful confetti mislead you. This is a very intense (and rewarding) story about starting at rock bottom and fighting to not only reach the core but surpass it brilliantly.

                        12. Euphoria – by Lily King

                        51s2YlJboaL

                          I have no idea what this book is about. I wish I could tell you but I never quite got past the cover. If you really must go past the book cover, there is a ton of praise and positive reviews that accompanies this book. It must be good. But more importantly, where can I hang this in my house?

                          13. The life and love of the sea – by Lewis Blackwell

                          81zvVHYb3vL

                            This is a book to behold and daydream, made easy with the beautiful images that leak from one page to the next, heavy with ocean fantasies.

                            14. Scent of a dream: Travels in the world of coffee – by Sebastiao Salgado

                            Advertising

                            71c8YERZDjL

                              At first glance, I genuinely thought this was a poster without a frame. The gorgeous photo pulls you in with eager fingers to undress the remainder of this coffee-table must have.

                              15. Cosmos – by Carl Sagan

                              0345539435

                                A popular and classic book frequent on most must-read lists, the cover alone induces a lot of wonder and the content is equally as marvelous.

                                16. Lust – Marc Lagrange

                                515ERT5U46L

                                  Feast your eyes on this series of photogenic essays. Although the hefty price tag might be a slight deterrent, it’s worth every lusty blink.

                                  17. Cain – by José Saramago

                                  cain

                                    A riveting take on a biblical story, the artsy cover doesn’t distract from the incredible story that lies beneath.

                                    Featured photo credit: Stockholm Public Library by Elmindreda via flickr.com

                                    More by this author

                                    Jolie Adam

                                    Thinker

                                    10 Tips For People Who Want To Try Meditation 17 Books With Breathtaking Covers That You Need To Know This Is What Will Happen To Your Body When You Become A Vegetarian 8 Amazing Things That Will Happen When You Start Eating Guava If You Want to Eat Healthier, You Should Follow This 7-Step Plan

                                    Trending in Hobby

                                    1 Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally 2 18 Things You Need To Know Before You Get Your First Tattoo 3 17 Free Websites That Will Improve the Quality of Your Life Today 4 Streaming or Downloading: Which Is the Best Use of Your Mobile Data? 5 7 Fun Things To Do When You’re Home Alone

                                    Read Next

                                    Advertising
                                    Advertising
                                    Advertising

                                    Last Updated on November 9, 2020

                                    10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

                                    10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

                                    Bad habits expose us to suffering that is entirely avoidable. Unfortunately, breaking bad habits is difficult because they are 100% dependent on our mental and emotional state.

                                    Anything we do that can prove harmful to us is a bad habit – drinking, drugs, smoking, procrastination, poor communication are all examples of bad habits. These habits have negative effects on our physical, mental, and emotional health.

                                    Humans are hardwired to respond to stimuli and to expect a consequence of any action. This is how habits are acquired: the brain expects to be rewarded a certain way under certain circumstances. How you initially responded to certain stimuli is how your brain will always remind you to behave when the same stimuli are experienced.

                                    If you visited the bar close to your office with colleagues every Friday, your brain will learn to send you a signal to stop there even when you are alone and eventually not just on Fridays. It will expect the reward of a drink after work every day, which can potentially lead to a drinking problem.

                                    Kicking negative behavior patterns and steering clear of them requires a lot of willpower, and there are many reasons why breaking bad habits is so difficult.

                                    1. Lack of Awareness or Acceptance

                                    Breaking a bad habit is not possible if the person who has it is not aware that it is a bad one.

                                    Many people will not realize that their communication skills are poor or that their procrastination is affecting them negatively, or even that the drink they had as a nightcap has now increased to three.

                                    Awareness brings acceptance. Unless a person realizes on their own that a habit is bad, or someone manages to convince them of the same, there is very little chance of the habit being kicked.

                                    2. No Motivation

                                    Going through a divorce, not being able to cope with academic pressure, and falling into debt are instances that can bring a profound sense of failure with them. A person going through these times can fall into a cycle of negative thinking where the world is against them and nothing they can do will ever help, so they stop trying altogether.

                                    Advertising

                                    This give-up attitude is a bad habit that just keeps coming around. Being in debt could make you feel like you are failing at maintaining your home, family, and life in general.

                                    If you are looking to get out of a rut and feel motivated, take a look at this article: Why Is Internal Motivation So Powerful (And How to Find It)

                                    3. Underlying Psychological Conditions

                                    Psychological conditions such as depression and ADD can make it difficult to start breaking bad habits.

                                    A depressed person may find it difficult to summon the energy to cook a healthy meal, resulting in food being ordered in or consumption of packaged foods. This could lead to a habit that adversely affects health and is difficult to overcome.

                                    A person with ADD may start to clean their house but get distracted soon after, leaving the task incomplete, eventually leading to a state where it is acceptable to live in a house that is untidy and dirty.

                                    The fear of missing out (FOMO) is very real to some people. Obsessively checking their social media and news sources, they may believe that not knowing of something as soon as it is published can be catastrophic to their social standing.

                                    4. Bad Habits Make Us Feel Good

                                    One of the reasons it is difficult to break habits is that a lot of them make us feel good.[1]

                                    We’ve all been there – the craving for a tub of ice cream after a breakup or a casual drag on a joint, never to be repeated until we miss how good it made us feel. We succumb to the craving for the pleasure felt while indulging in it, cementing it as a habit even while we are aware it isn’t good for us.

                                    Overeating is a very common bad habit. Just another pack of chips, a couple of candies, a large soda… none of these are necessary for survival. We want them because they give us comfort. They’re familiar, they taste good, and we don’t even notice when we progress from just one extra slice of pizza to four.

                                    Advertising

                                    You can read this article to learn more: We Do What We Know Is Bad for Us, Why?

                                    5. Upward Comparisons

                                    Comparisons are a bad habit that many of us have been exposed to since we were children. Parents might have compared us to siblings, teachers may have compared us to classmates, and bosses could compare us to past and present employees.

                                    The people who have developed the bad habit of comparing themselves to others have been given incorrect yardsticks for measurement from the start.

                                    These people will always find it difficult to break out of this bad habit because there will always be someone who has it better than they do: a better house, better car, better job, higher income and so on.

                                    Research shows that in the age of social media, social comparisons are much easier and can ultimately harm self-esteem if scrolling becomes a bad habit[2].

                                    6. No Alternative

                                    This is a real and valid reason why breaking bad habits is difficult. These habits could fulfill a need that may not be met any other way.

                                    Someone who has physical or psychological limitations, such as a disability or social anxiety, may find it hard to quit obsessive content consumption for better habits.

                                    Alternately, a perfectly healthy person may be unable to quit smoking because alternates are just not working out.

                                    Similarly, a person who bites their nails when anxious may be unable to relieve stress in any other socially accepted manner.

                                    Advertising

                                    7. Stress

                                    As mentioned above, anything that stresses us out can lead to adopting and cementing an unhealthy habit.

                                    When a person is stressed about something, it is easy for bad habits to form because the mental resources required to fight them are not available[3].

                                    We often see a person who had previously managed to kick a bad habit fall back into the old ways because they felt their stress couldn’t be managed any other way.

                                    If you need some help reducing stress, check out the following video for some healthy ways to get started:

                                    8. Sense of Failure

                                    People looking to kick bad habits may feel a strong sense of failure because it’s just that difficult.

                                    Dropping a bad habit usually means changes in lifestyle that people may be unwilling to make, or these changes might not be easy to make in spite of the will to make them.

                                    Overeaters need to empty their house of unhealthy food, resist the urge to order in, and not pick up their standard grocery items from the store. Those who drink too much need to avoid the bars or even people who drink often.

                                    If such people slip even once with a glass of wine, or a smoke, or a bag of chips, they tend to be excessively harsh on themselves and feel like failures.

                                    9. The Need to Be All-New

                                    People who are looking to break bad habits feel they need to re-create themselves in order to break themselves of their bad habits, while the truth is the complete opposite.

                                    Advertising

                                    These people actually need to go back to who they were before they developed the bad habit and try to create good habits from there.

                                    10. Force of Habit

                                    Humans are creatures of habit, and having familiar, comforting outcomes for daily triggers helps us maintain a sense of balance in our lives.

                                    Consider people who are used to lighting up a cigarette every time they talk on the phone or eating junk food when watching TV. They will always associate a phone call with a puff on the cigarette and screen time with eating.

                                    These habits, though bad, are a source of comfort to them, as is meeting with those people they indulge in these bad habits with.

                                    Final Thoughts

                                    These are the main reasons why breaking bad habits is difficult, but the good news is that the task is not impossible. Breaking habits takes time, and you’ll need to put long-term goals in place to replace a bad habit with a good one.

                                    There are many compassionate, positive and self-loving techniques to kick bad habits. The internet is rich in information regarding bad habits, their effects and how to overcome them, while professional help is always available for those who feel they need it.

                                    More on Breaking Bad Habits

                                    Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

                                    Reference

                                    [1] After Skool: Why Do Bad Habits Feel SO GOOD?
                                    [2] Psychology of Popular Media Culture: Social comparison, social media, and self-esteem.
                                    [3] Stanford Medicine: Examining how stress affects good and bad habits

                                    Read Next