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7 Signs You’re Ready for a Full-Time Freelance Career

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7 Signs You’re Ready for a Full-Time Freelance Career

Let me guess: You have a steady day job and you are earning well, but something inside you says there’s more to work than the daily “nine-to-five” grind.

You heard about freelancing jobs and how it can replace your current income (or even surpass it). You thought, “Wow, wouldn’t that be great?”

So you went ahead started freelancing — part-time. You landed a client and you got paid for your first freelancing gig. It felt immensely satisfying — and you want to do it again.

And then you think: “What if I did that full-time?”

It’s an exciting concept: The image of you sipping a cup of coffee in the kitchen table while working on your laptop is more appealing than the daily commute to the office.

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You start to think about more reasons that freelancing might work for you. No demanding boss, no long hours, no dress code and certainly no need to leave the house. Most of all, you do the work that you love.

So are you ready to take the leap? Here are some ways to help you find out:

1. You have enough money in the bank

Your savings account is pretty decent, and it’s enough to last you six months to a year in case freelancing didn’t work. This is important even when your freelancing career starts to take off.

In a freelancer’s work life, it’s normal to have a feast-and-famine cycle. Certain times you will have loads of work, and other times there will be very little or no work at all.

Either way, a financial buffer is always a good thing.

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2. You have a few clients in the pipeline

When you leave your day job, your income stops. So if you already have clients that pay you for your freelance work, and you’re sure you can depend on them, it’s a safe situation to begin freelancing full-time.

If you have a few clients at the start, it will certainly make your first few months of freelancing less stressful.

3. You are extremely unhappy with your day job

You don’t just leave your job because you don’t like it. But if you’re at a point when you’ve lost motivation, stopped being productive and find yourself indifferent to your company’s goals, then you might be better off leaving.

Ask yourself if this feeling has something to do with wanting to start freelancing full-time, and the answer will most probably be a resounding “yes”.

4. The idea of freelancing excites you more than it scares you

If you feel excited and motivated to make freelancing your full-time career, then it may be what you need to do. You just have to do it.

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You know that it can be a risk, but it’s one you’re willing to take.

This is when you know you’re serious about doing something that you love: You have no problem leaving your comfort zone into the uncertainty that awaits — in the hopes of making your dreams come true.

5. You have years of experience in your field

As a new freelancer, you face tough competition with others who have been doing this for a long time. You might have a tough time landing clients at first.

One way to stand out is to show that you’re already an expert in your field or niche before you started freelancing. This acquired knowledge will set you apart and give you an edge, even without a full portfolio as a freelancer.

6. You know it’s not going to be easy

While you’re attracted to the convenience of working from home, you are aware of the hard work that comes with working on your own.

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You know that being a freelancer means running your own business. You have a plan in place to grow your business and raise your income to its full potential.

7. You have supportive family and friends

Freelancing demands a huge amount of your time. Having friends and family that respect and understand the nature of your work is essential to your success. Your personal life should not distract, but rather empower you to achieve your goals.

Being a full-time freelancer is not for everyone, and there is no need to rush when deciding if it’s for you. Take your time to consider the pros and cons. While it’s great to follow your dream, a practical approach can’t hurt.

Most importantly, only do it if it’s your passion — something you can imagine yourself doing for the rest of your professional life.

Featured photo credit: Eutah Mizushima via images.unsplash.com

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